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Old 01-01-2011, 05:44 PM   #1
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Default Slow fermentation with Sorghum and Rice extract

Slow fermentation with Breiss Sorghum and Brown Rice extract. Anyone found a solution, using ale yeast at 70 degrees, tried yest nutrient, taking about 3 weeks to complete. Same stuf with partial infusion goes right off done in few days, must be a nutrient issue, but ive tried a few different ones, any ideas?????

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Old 01-01-2011, 06:49 PM   #2
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I've not had any problems and mine ferments at about 65-68. Are you doing anything special with the yeast or just pitching it?

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Old 01-01-2011, 09:10 PM   #3
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i was pitching GF dry yeast, but i diluted and kicked off some whites liquid irish ale yeast in a gallon for a couple of days and pitched it yesterday in 4 batches: the partial mashes kicked off hard in about 8 hours, the extract with Breiss brown rice is going hard in 24 hrs (blew my lock out!!) , the Breiss sorghum is still coming up although its going.

Same temp, same yeast, the order of kicking off was the mashes (w malted oats), much slower was the brown rice, and a lot slower was the sorghum.

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Old 01-05-2011, 03:36 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pintail78 View Post
i was pitching GF dry yeast, but i diluted and kicked off some whites liquid irish ale yeast in a gallon for a couple of days and pitched it yesterday in 4 batches: the partial mashes kicked off hard in about 8 hours, the extract with Breiss brown rice is going hard in 24 hrs (blew my lock out!!) , the Breiss sorghum is still coming up although its going.

Same temp, same yeast, the order of kicking off was the mashes (w malted oats), much slower was the brown rice, and a lot slower was the sorghum.
BRS is low in FAN, without any yeast nutrient it could cause a slow or stuck ferment. Of course, it matters what the proportion of Sorghum to BRS was.
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Old 01-12-2011, 05:42 AM   #5
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Have my first GF going. With a normal batch with Wyeast smack pack, I blow off a half pitcher through a 1" blow off on my carboy, settles down in 4-5 days. This batch, Nottingham + nutrients, bubbled good, but not enough to hit the hose, and still popping the airlock every 15 seconds after 12 days. Normal? ~75% sorghum, 25% rice.

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Old 01-12-2011, 03:01 PM   #6
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Have my first GF going. With a normal batch with Wyeast smack pack, I blow off a half pitcher through a 1" blow off on my carboy, settles down in 4-5 days. This batch, Nottingham + nutrients, bubbled good, but not enough to hit the hose, and still popping the airlock every 15 seconds after 12 days. Normal? ~75% sorghum, 25% rice.
It's hard to say for sure. While it's not totally abnormal to have a few bubbles in the airlock it is a bit on the extreme side. Perhaps the yeast needed a starter before going in the batch, or the fermentation temps are on the low side.

I have noticed before that in some of my GF batches there seems to be less viscosity meaning that while it still makes the same CO2, there is a little less in-carboy head-retention.

Ultimately though, every batch is different, so it's hard to say for sure. Just make sure you use plenty of yeast nutrient.

As annecdote, I just did a batch of with Nottingham that was 50% sorghum and 50% Rice with nutrient (and some toasted grains) and it fermented fully within a few days just like a non-GF beer. And after a few weeks it's starting to taste mighty delicious.
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Old 01-12-2011, 03:10 PM   #7
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Have you actually taken a hydro reading to see if it's still fermenting, or are you relying on the air lock to tell you that something is happening? Because that something may be 100 things other than fermentation. I've had fermentations look like they were just slugging along that I checked after 4 days to find that they were actually almost done already. They even looked active for the following week, but were actually done the whole time.

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Old 01-12-2011, 03:22 PM   #8
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Have you actually taken a hydro reading to see if it's still fermenting, or are you relying on the air lock to tell you that something is happening? Because that something may be 100 things other than fermentation. I've had fermentations look like they were just slugging along that I checked after 4 days to find that they were actually almost done already. They even looked active for the following week, but were actually done the whole time.
Good point. Say you had a carboy in a warm closet, then opened the door to look at it letting cold air into the room, then you'd actually have the warm air in the carboy attempting to escape towards the colder air in the room. It would make the airlock have activity when it's really just simple convection.
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Old 01-12-2011, 03:52 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by ruppe View Post
Have my first GF going. With a normal batch with Wyeast smack pack, I blow off a half pitcher through a 1" blow off on my carboy, settles down in 4-5 days. This batch, Nottingham + nutrients, bubbled good, but not enough to hit the hose, and still popping the airlock every 15 seconds after 12 days. Normal? ~75% sorghum, 25% rice.
We would have to know which Wyeast yeast to know if this is normal. Sounds like an English or Hefeweizen yeast though. Notty is a bit more controlled, sounds normal too.

I also wanted to note that the GF beer you made with Wyeast yeast is not very GF. I would recommend not feeding it to anyone who is remotely sensitive to gluten.
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Old 01-12-2011, 08:49 PM   #10
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Sorry, the Wyeast comparison was for non-GF beers, just using as a comparison. To try to clarify, I have never had a contamination problem, temp is 66 based on one of those stick on gauges, which is normal for the dark corner of the back room in the basement where I always ferment. All things being the same, this batch is just going in slow motion compared to my other brews. I guess I was wondering if the sorghum/rice just didn't ferment as fast as barley. Smaller pitch rate of dry vs. smack-pack? I can't remember the last time I used dry yeast. I know this will make some cringe, but I haven't taken a hydrometer reading for years. I know my system, it's consistent, and I know when my beers are ready to bottle. I suppose I could dig it out and see where I'm at.

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