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-   -   Rice Syrup Solids in place of syrup (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/rice-syrup-solids-place-syrup-176035/)

frogguruami 05-02-2010 03:27 PM

Rice Syrup Solids in place of syrup
 
I want to do the Dbl Choc Oatmeal Stout recipe but I can't find Brown rice syrup anywhere (at least not at a price that won't require a second mortgage!!!). Can I sub the rice syrup solids that Midwest sells and if so is it pound for pound or is there some other ratio I should use?

TIA!!

Lcasanova 05-02-2010 04:51 PM

That's what I've been doing when I can't run out and get brown rice syrup. I use the solids in place of the syrup and it seems to work just fine...not that I've made a recipe twice and changed that...Go for it!

Are you doing the recipe in my drop down? If you are, I'd probably cut back a bit on the rice syrup.

dorklord 05-02-2010 11:41 PM

Rice syrup solid is made by dehydrating the rice syrup, so it is the same thing minus water. As a result, you don't need quite as much of it as if you were using syrup. I'm not quite sure what the ratio between them is, but I think I've heard that 1 lb of DME is equal to 1.2 lbs LME, so I would expect the same of rice solids to rice syrup.

frogguruami 05-04-2010 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcasanova (Post 2038411)

Are you doing the recipe in my drop down? If you are, I'd probably cut back a bit on the rice syrup.

Yes, that is the one I a doing. A friend who LOVES stouts has given up gluten because of Intestinal Colitis. So when I saw that recipe I knew I had to try it! Thanks for posting it!

Lcasanova 05-04-2010 02:17 PM

Well, as far as color goes, I would say it is more of a brown ale than a stout or even a porter...I have to find some way to get that dark dark color out of my grains without burning them. If you figure something out, let me know! Check the original recipe before I adapted it too, that will give you an idea how it turns out in case you want to tweak it a bit. Cutting back on the rice syrup will help, it was way too high in ABV and I think a longer time on the vanilla with a little less chocolate should do the trick too. Those are my planned changes for the next time I brew this in October.

aggieotis 05-06-2010 03:34 PM

The difference between browned and burnt is actually a REALLY fine line when toasting grains. I would say it's probably a logarithmic plot. Nothing happens for a long time and then BAM every minute counts.

Lcasanova 05-06-2010 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aggieotis (Post 2045741)
The difference between browned and burnt is actually a REALLY fine line when toasting grains. I would say it's probably a logarithmic plot. Nothing happens for a long time and then BAM every minute counts.

That's what I worry about, not to mention my house smelling like ass in the mean time, burning the grains would be even worse.

frogguruami 05-06-2010 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcasanova (Post 2041582)
Well, as far as color goes, I would say it is more of a brown ale than a stout or even a porter...I have to find some way to get that dark dark color out of my grains without burning them. If you figure something out, let me know! Check the original recipe before I adapted it too, that will give you an idea how it turns out in case you want to tweak it a bit. Cutting back on the rice syrup will help, it was way too high in ABV and I think a longer time on the vanilla with a little less chocolate should do the trick too. Those are my planned changes for the next time I brew this in October.

What about using some Lactose for some creaminess?


Here is may plan for trying to making this darker.

First, I am going to double the grain and replace half of the rolled oats with whole oats. I am going to go for a black patent toast on the whole oats.

Second, I am going to caramelize 3lbs of honey until it is almost black (think Bochet Mead). This will add a little fermentable sugar but not as much as it sounds since cooking the honey that long converts a lot of the sugar to something that is not fermentable. I will cut back a tad on the rice syrup solids to conpesate for the extra fermentables.

Third, I will use Black Strap Molasses.

Does that sound workable?

Lcasanova 05-06-2010 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frogguruami (Post 2045983)
What about using some Lactose for some creaminess?


Here is may plan for trying to making this darker.

First, I am going to double the grain and replace half of the rolled oats with whole oats. I am going to go for a black patent toast on the whole oats.

Second, I am going to caramelize 3lbs of honey until it is almost black (think Bochet Mead). This will add a little fermentable sugar but not as much as it sounds since cooking the honey that long converts a lot of the sugar to something that is not fermentable. I will cut back a tad on the rice syrup solids to conpesate for the extra fermentables.

Third, I will use Black Strap Molasses.

Does that sound workable?

I have limited experience with lactose, maybe someone else can chime in about that.

Since the grains are only for steeping I usually try to stay below 2lbs if I can, otherwise it just gets ridiculous. I think if you can get some of the oats extra dark there will be no need to double the grain bill.

I really can't say anything about the honey, I've never attempted to carmelize it and I've only used it raw in my pumpkin ales.

+++1000 on the blackstrap molasses, I've used it a few times and the molasses twang never came through in the beer but it does add some color and fermentables.

frogguruami 05-06-2010 06:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcasanova (Post 2046035)

I really can't say anything about the honey, I've never attempted to carmelize it and I've only used it raw in my pumpkin ales.

Here's how dark honey can get! This is a Bochet I made a few months ago.


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