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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Quinoa Pilsner
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Old 08-05-2011, 02:11 PM   #11
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Yeah its a pay-article - are you sure the amylase will stick to the water, and remain there instead of remaining attached to the grain? I guess crushing will help. You could add extra amylase just in-case there are any losses, it'll all get killed at the end of the mash anyway. And I second the idea of just doing the mash for an hour or maybe a bit longer, if doing these things first (crushing and/or gelatinizing).
Now I wanna try this...

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Old 08-05-2011, 03:02 PM   #12
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I'm think as long as you crack the grain and let it sit for like half an hour at 120 ish you will have enzymes in the liquid. Adding extra enzyme, or at least having it on hand seems like a solid idea though. Once the millet I have malting finishes I'll give it a shot but it is a different grain so it'll be a little different. Good luck when you try this.

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Old 08-05-2011, 04:14 PM   #13
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are you sure the amylase will stick to the water, and remain there instead of remaining attached to the grain?
Yes. People have been brewing for thousands of years so there's enough evidence of it working out there

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I guess crushing will help.
You can't really do a mash without crushing the grain.... or you'd have terrible efficiency.

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You could add extra amylase just in-case there are any losses, it'll all get killed at the end of the mash anyway
Adding alpha amylase when there is already plenty present is going to make the beer reeeaaally dry. Quinoa is already a bit lacking in flavor... you get that beer dry and there's going to be zero flavor left.

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I'm think as long as you crack the grain and let it sit for like half an hour at 120 ish you will have enzymes in the liquid.
Um.... sitting at 120 will only allow beta-glucanase enzymes to work. In order to get complete conversion, you need to mash between 148*F and 158*F. These are the temperatures that alpha-amylase and beta-amylase work well in conjuction.



Read Palmer's How to Brew. It seems like you guys are still really new to all-grain and unsure of the processes.
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Old 08-05-2011, 04:26 PM   #14
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I know the amylase enzymes won't be active until 148-158. I had just finished reading the article that I posted earlier and was just kind of thinking out loud.

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Old 08-05-2011, 04:32 PM   #15
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Okay, but I'm just curious as to where/why you're getting 120?

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Old 08-05-2011, 04:34 PM   #16
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You let it soak at that temperature to extract the enzymes, they might not be active but they'll be in the liquid. Then you drain some of the liquid, containing the enzymes, boil the grain to gelatinize it, then return it to the liquid raising it up to 148-158 to actually convert everything. I'll check again when I get back home to see if that is what they had.

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Old 08-05-2011, 04:46 PM   #17
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Again, I'm pretty sure that malted quinoa will act like all other malted grains... the starches will gelatinize at mash temperatures.

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Old 08-05-2011, 04:48 PM   #18
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Where the heck did you get malted quinoa?

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Old 08-05-2011, 06:38 PM   #19
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Probably malted it themselves.

You're probably right about not needed to boil the grains themselves, someone a while back did a quinoa pale ale and they just mashed at 150. I only brought it up because from what I've read it can increase the amount of fermentable sugars you can get from the grains, but I've really only read papers about it on millet and sorghum so I don't know if it would help with quinoa.

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Old 08-05-2011, 06:38 PM   #20
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Sorry, I am new to brewing... I'm reading some books right now - I wish someone would write a book for GF brewing.

blacklab: check out the first sticky in the forum category... probably have to malt your own

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