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-   -   Quinoa Pilsner (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/quinoa-pilsner-260709/)

mloster 08-03-2011 11:05 PM

Quinoa Pilsner
 
Ok. Here's what I'm planning to mash tonight and brew tomorrow. It's a 2.5 gallon batch.

~3.5 lbs malted quinoa (not roasted)
~ 1lb malted buckwheat (i may leave this out as it may be too strong for the beer)
1 lb honey
.5 lb corn sugar
.75 oz Saaz @ 60 min
.125 oz Saaz @ 15 min
.125 oz Saaz @ flameout
1 whirlfloc tablet @ 15 min (for clarity)
Saflager S-23

Even though the grains are malted, I was planning on boiling them for an hour or so, waiting till the mash water reached 158 deg, and adding amylase. I'll then wrap the pot in towels to maintain the temp as best as possible and let it sit for 24 hours. After the 24 hours, I'll sparge in another pot at 170 deg or so, denaturing the amylase enzymes. Then I'll have my (hopefully) sugary wort and brew as normal. Any suggestions or changes? Only corn sugar and no honey? More or less hops? I entered all the info into beercalculus, and it fit the classic american pilsner style.

Reno_eNVy 08-03-2011 11:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mloster (Post 3141293)
Ok. Here's what I'm planning to mash tonight and brew tomorrow. It's a 2.5 gallon batch.

~3.5 lbs malted quinoa (not roasted)
~ 1lb malted buckwheat (i may leave this out as it may be too strong for the beer)
1 lb honey
.5 lb corn sugar
.75 oz Saaz @ 60 min
.125 oz Saaz @ 15 min
.125 oz Saaz @ flameout
1 whirlfloc tablet @ 15 min (for clarity)
Saflager S-23

Even though the grains are malted, I was planning on boiling them for an hour or so, waiting till the mash water reached 158 deg, and adding amylase. I'll then wrap the pot in towels to maintain the temp as best as possible and let it sit for 24 hours. After the 24 hours, I'll sparge in another pot at 170 deg or so, denaturing the amylase enzymes. Then I'll have my (hopefully) sugary wort and brew as normal. Any suggestions or changes? Only corn sugar and no honey? More or less hops? I entered all the info into beercalculus, and it fit the classic american pilsner style.

I wouldn't boil the malt.... it's malted for a reason. There are enzymes aside from alpha amylase that work in a mash to get a proper wort. Boiling will denature all of them.

You'll probably also want to increase the malt and decrease the simple sugars (i.e. honey and corn sugar.) Half the grain bill will make it terribly dry and probably add some weird flavors.

Also, why the 24 hour mash?

kapbrew13 08-03-2011 11:21 PM

Quinoa. That grain is pretty flavorless. What kind of flavor you expecting from this batch?

mloster 08-03-2011 11:27 PM

Actually, the quinoa smells very nutty. I think it should impart a grain-y like taste. Maybe I won't boil the mash. In the current recipe, the grain bill 75% quinoa and buckwheat and 25% simple sugars. The main reason I was contemplating a 24 hour mash was to achieve the most conversion of the grains (sort of like a chestnut beer).

kapbrew13 08-03-2011 11:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mloster
Actually, the quinoa smells very nutty. I think it should impart a grain-y like taste. Maybe I won't boil the mash. In the current recipe, the grain bill 75% quinoa and buckwheat and 25% simple sugars. The main reason I was contemplating a 24 hour mash was to achieve the most conversion of the grains (sort of like a chestnut beer).

I have quinoa weekly and load it with peppers, onions, garlic and spices. I think its there only for the texture. Or my palate is busted. Well good luck. Should atleast be a refreshing brew.

mloster 08-03-2011 11:39 PM

Hmm. Alright, I may try light roasting the quinoa and wafting it for a week. I want to get the beer started though. Maybe I'll try brewing this tonight and then try an identical recipe with light roasted quinoa to compare. So many options.

kapbrew13 08-03-2011 11:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mloster
Hmm. Alright, I may try light roasting the quinoa and wafting it for a week. I want to get the beer started though. Maybe I'll try brewing this tonight and then try an identical recipe with light roasted quinoa to compare. So many options.

Experimenting is part of the fun. Nothing to lose.

DougmanXL 08-04-2011 02:02 PM

Other than the blanket, how were you planning to keep the temp constant; leaving it on a hot-plate? You might wanna consider an 8 or 12hr mash instead, it might be easier to monitor the temperature...

Reno_eNVy 08-04-2011 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mloster (Post 3141342)
Actually, the quinoa smells very nutty. I think it should impart a grain-y like taste. Maybe I won't boil the mash. In the current recipe, the grain bill 75% quinoa and buckwheat and 25% simple sugars. The main reason I was contemplating a 24 hour mash was to achieve the most conversion of the grains (sort of like a chestnut beer).

That sounds like a good idea. But I still don't think you need such a long mash. If you crush the grain, once you dough-in (when you mix strike water and grains together) the enzymes will be able to disperse and get the job done in an hour.

I hope someone with more GF brewing experience could chime in, but does that sound right? I'm pretty sure GF mashes don't need to go any longer than a regular mash.

What you can do instead is mash for an hour and do an iodine starch test. Take a drop of your mash and put it in a white plate. Then drop a bit of iodophor or iodine in there and if it stays brown you have full conversion. If it turns black or purple, you still have starch and it needs to continue mashing.

sly333332003 08-05-2011 12:16 AM

Something that may help is decantation mashing. I think it is similar to cereal mashing but you use all of the grist. Bring your mash up to 113 ish degrees and remove the liquid. Boil the grist to gelatinize the grains, add back to your liquid that contains all your enzymes. This lets the grains be gelatinize but still use their own amylase to mash. I don't know at what temperature quinoa gelatinizes at but this might help anyway.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...00002673#secx7

This is the article that I read that describes the process. I don't know if you can see it or not, you might have to buy it. I am still in school so my campus allows free access to stuff like this. Hooray private engineering school.


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