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Old 09-08-2010, 05:28 AM   #11
DirtbagHB
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sorry. i got lost........ stoopid college.. anyway. i just did another batch of this.sparged 10 gallons and did a dark and a session.. im out of money and need to stretch things.

any who.. as for the enzymes. ive been using Amalyase Enzyme Formula from Crosby & Baker. the bottle calls for 1tsp per 5 gal. i been adding an eyeballed 1.5 tsp. to the mash figuring the quinoa has ~0 enzymes for conversion. this is also the reason i add the extra sugars and not rely heavily on starch conversion. i hope for conversion, but since i cant find enzymes structured specifically for quinoa i know im not getting anything close to complete conversion.

now on to the malting aspect of things. my process is a bit of a pain in the ass. so i get my quinoa in 4lb bags as costco. i dump 2 of them into one of my 7 gal primary buckets. i rinse and strain the grain once. then fill the bucket to maximum. the quinoas a f-n sponge. so i check it a few hours later and add more water. skim the foam off the surface and let it sit with the lid and air lock. at this point ill strain and refill with warm water 2x a day. morning and evening. so here comes the ambient temperature variability. if its warmer the quinoa sprouts faster. if its cooler it takes longer. quinoa is really nice. it sprouts under water! i wait till the quinoa is sprouted to about 2x the length of the grain. at this point drain and strain the quinoa.

its time to dry. i made a hammock out of a bed sheet and hung it in the back yard, placing the grain in it to dry. several times a day i went out and stirred things up with my hands. take the grain inside before rain ect. so after several days the grain is dried.

toasting time. i used 2 large brownie sheets. splitting the grain between them. i preheated my oven to 250F. placed the grain in oven. wait 10 minutes. stir the grain (i used a hand potato masher, pay attention to the corners) stir every 5 minutes. after 20 minutes (total time) bump the temp up to 300- 350. total times and what not are all relative. just keep stirring when it smells a lot like grapenuts its in range. your eye your color. but i might note, there is a VERY VERY SLIM LINE BETWEEN GOOD AND COAL. after i cool the grain i put it in a brown bag for a few days. let it waft.

i dont have a roller or a mill. so i use the vita mix blender. i prepare my mash ton by lining it with a large nylon (5 gal capacity?) bag. add heafty layer of rice hulls (2-4ish). so in the blender place 1-2cups of quinoa at a time. run it for 30sec or so. cracked and battered but not dust. this may take several cycles with the blender.. usually takes me about 5 runs. after i crack the grain i add it on top of the rice hulls. blend,dump, blend, dump....
heat sparge water to 140ish, and heres what i found.. quinoa is a sponge. +2 gals. sit. then add more. the oatmeal standard didnt work. so i go more for the cream of wheat standard, then make it a bit more soupy. wait 45-1hour. then top the cooler/mashtun up with 170F water. wait another hour. open the ball valve and let it flow into my boil pot. for stuck flows the nylon bag is really neat. just grasp it firmly at the top directly above the outlet and lift ever so gently. just enough to shift the bag so the nylon isnt clogged. no more stuck mask.

brew and enjoy!..

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Old 09-08-2010, 05:31 AM   #12
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double post sorry

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Old 09-08-2010, 04:09 PM   #13
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Good stuff, sounds like the process could be refined a bit, but I am glad you found something that gives good results.

The malting process also sounds a bit easier than I expected actually.

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Old 09-08-2010, 05:46 PM   #14
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refinement comes with an influx of cash....... so it might be a while... was using a 6 lb cannon ball and a steel mixing bowl to crush my grain. after 3 hours to crush just half.. gave up on that idea and moved to the blender.

any ideas about refinement.. i find tring to use a false bottom is guarentee for getting stuck. the quinoa is just tooo little

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Old 09-08-2010, 06:02 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtbagHomebrew View Post
i find tring to use a false bottom is guarentee for getting stuck. the quinoa is just tooo little
You should try mixing a whole bunch of rice hulls in there to make a bit more of a filter bed.

AHS - http://www.austinhomebrew.com/product_info.php?products_id=132&osCsid=bb69b3f5b5 60369b696efe12f29ec0e1
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Old 09-08-2010, 06:05 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aggieotis View Post
You should try mixing a whole bunch of rice hulls in there to make a bit more of a filter bed.

AHS - http://www.austinhomebrew.com/product_info.php?products_id=132&osCsid=bb69b3f5b5 60369b696efe12f29ec0e1
I actually see that he is using a strainer bag and rice hulls, I dont think that there is a better option than that.

There are some drying options that use a box fan and window screens for the grain. Not sure it would work for you, but it's an idea. Search on 'drying hops'.

Grain mills can get pretty cheap, Corona mills are only about $40 new. Sounds like it would save you LOTS of time too.

All in all, I was just thinking about some time savings you could implement, but your process sounds like a good one. I really think you are onto something.
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Old 09-08-2010, 07:59 PM   #17
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I actually see that he is using a strainer bag and rice hulls, I dont think that there is a better option than that.
My bad, I just skimmed towards the bottom and missed that part.

Carry on.
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Old 12-29-2010, 06:51 PM   #18
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I tried something similar to this to try to make a 100% quinoa beer.
Did you try an iodine test to see if the starches were converting? After a couple of hours (first at temps near 140 then at temps around 150) it looked like I still had very little conversion. Boiled it up anyway (concentrated quite a bit -- OG of 1.065) but I'm worried it's mostly starch. This is the second time I've tried and just can't get the damn starch to convert. Anyone have similar trouble with quinoa? Maybe there's enough sugar in there to make beer?

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Old 12-29-2010, 06:57 PM   #19
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I tried something similar to this to try to make a 100% quinoa beer.
Did you try an iodine test to see if the starches were converting? After a couple of hours (first at temps near 140 then at temps around 150) it looked like I still had very little conversion. Boiled it up anyway (concentrated quite a bit -- OG of 1.065) but I'm worried it's mostly starch. This is the second time I've tried and just can't get the damn starch to convert. Anyone have similar trouble with quinoa? Maybe there's enough sugar in there to make beer?
Not many have tried, but I doubt there is enough sugar just lying around in Quinoa to make a decent beer. After all, if this were the case, people probably wouldn't use it as a replacement food for grains, but rather as a sweetener or sugar substitute.

Let us know how your experiment comes out, did you add any enzymes?
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Old 12-29-2010, 07:09 PM   #20
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Not sure what you mean about it not having enough sugar -- I mean 100% barley beer is delicious and isn't used as a sugar substitute...
But anyway, ya, used tons of amylase enzyme, though, like I said, the iodine test kept coming up positive for starch.

Here's what I did in more detail:
I used pre-sprouted quinoa grains, toasted in the oven for ~30 mins.
Mash-in was 12oz quinoa and 1/2gallon of water at 125F, then stepped up (using combination decoction and infusion) to ~140.
After an hour or so raised to ~150 and left it there for another hour and half maybe.
After all that it still seemed starchy, but anyway I sparged with another 1/2 gallon and then boiled for an hour with 1/2oz noble hops of some sort that i found in the freezer. Ended up with 3 cups of wort at 1.064, tossed it into a growler with a packet of champagne yeast. This morning it looks like it's somewhat active, so we'll see.

Don't really know what I'm doing, only do partial mashes so don't have all the equipment for more complicated stuff, but got any ideas for improving conversion?

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