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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Pacific Gyre GF IPA
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Old 05-14-2012, 11:29 PM   #11
igliashon
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3 gallon batch!

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Old 05-15-2012, 01:50 AM   #12
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3 gallon batch!
OOoooooo
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Old 05-31-2012, 03:06 PM   #13
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This is finally carbed, and tasting great! Two non-GF friends have remarked "this doesn't taste gluten-free", and one even compared it to a Lagunitas IPA! I definitely get a bit of Arrogant Bastard, the maltiness is big, round, and a little syrupy (as it should be in an 8% beer). More balanced than the Grapefruit IPA, and better-looking too (because I actually put it through secondary). The malt base was good, definitely a candidate for repeating, but I wish I could have doubled the dry-hops. I also wish I had bittered with something stronger, like Nugget or Columbus, and used the Willamette in tandem with the Chinook for flavor and aroma. Next time I brew this, I will make those changes.

Also, I think the Tinseth formula for IBUs is not working for me, it's giving inaccurately-high results. This is not a 70+ IBU beer, probably more like 50ish. Gonna switch to "Average" in Hopville.

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Old 06-01-2012, 02:53 AM   #14
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What is your malt base? I don't see any malted grains in your recipe. Is it the sweet potato?

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Old 06-01-2012, 03:21 AM   #15
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Ha ha, yeah, I used the word "malt" pretty loosely...what's a better word for the mixture of rice extract, sorghum extract, candi syrup, and sweet potato that I used?

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Old 02-14-2013, 04:54 PM   #16
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igliashon, I have a few questions on the preperation of the sweet potatoes that you used for this recipe.

From the article you posted it seems like they are making a syrup out of them, did you do that ahead of time and then dump that in to the wort at the start of the boil? Or was it more like steeping them and removing the "pulp" and then boiling like any other grain?

Also, how much do you think the recipe would differ without the use of the sweet potatoes? If you were to leave them out what would be a good replacement?

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Old 02-14-2013, 05:25 PM   #17
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From the article you posted it seems like they are making a syrup out of them, did you do that ahead of time and then dump that in to the wort at the start of the boil? Or was it more like steeping them and removing the "pulp" and then boiling like any other grain?
The latter. I'm actually going back to experimenting a bit with sweet potatoes, just because the few beers I brewed with them last year were so good. What I've tried most recently (and what I think might work better than the way I did it in this recipe) is to bake the sweet potatoes at low heat for a long time, wrapped in foil, and then open the wrapping and roast them at high heat to get a little caramelization of the sugars going on. I prepared two potatoes in this way, and both were exuding a sweet syrup by the end of the roasting. I collected the syrup and then chopped up the potatoes and put them in the wort along with the syrup, to steep as the water came to a boil.

Next time, I think I'll roast just like that, but then freeze the potatoes so they're solid enough to chop in a food processor. They were too mushy to chop into anything smaller than big chunks when they were fresh out of the oven.

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Also, how much do you think the recipe would differ without the use of the sweet potatoes? If you were to leave them out what would be a good replacement?
Possibly banana...I want to try roasting bananas as well, probably in their skins, to see what happens. Both sweet potatoes and banana have amylase, but not enough to convert other starches. Butternut squash might also work if you don't want to do sweet potatoes, but I'm not sure if it turns sweet when cooked low the way sweet potatoes do.
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