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Old 02-02-2011, 01:59 AM   #1
JerryE
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Default Melanoidin Flour?

I have gotten the opportunity to enter a small GF brewing competition with a friend. It is pretty interesting. Basically they are doing a "bake-off" between 2 equal batches: one is DME + clarex, and the other is Dry Sorghum Extract. It is really over my head, but it is a good opportunity for me to learn from my friend. He has a lot of non-GF brewing experience, and is getting back into it.

Along with the contest instructions, they included the following tip (the contest kit came with GF rice flour):

Melanoidin Flour: Malty or “Beer”y flavor is mostly ascribed to melanoidins, which are reactions between sugars & proteins when heated while in solution. This is easy to accomplish with the included flour. Simply mix sugar & flour along with some water to moisten and bake on a tray in the oven at some time & temp. Lower temp / longer time will give different flavors than higher temps & shorter times.


Is this a familiar technique? My experience is very limited, but I had not read about this anywhere. Any advice on how best to apply it, in terms of temp, time, and best GF flour to use?

Thanks,
Jerry

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Old 02-02-2011, 02:27 AM   #2
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Looked it up, doesn't seem to be too common, but appears to have been done with flours (wheat and rye) before. Seems that it's a way to get a toasty flavor out of something (bread crust type). I mostly pull up examples about Munich and Vienna malts that are kilned. I guess that makes sense since toasted rice flour has a different scent and flavor than rice flour with sugar and water in a dough.

I'll keep digging around.

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Old 02-02-2011, 02:32 AM   #3
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Many of us roast unmalted, GF grains to add color and flavor to our beers. It sounds like the same thing, only using flour instead of whole grains. I read on another board about a guy making gluten free buns to brew with.

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Old 02-02-2011, 02:32 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM View Post
Looked it up, doesn't seem to be too common, but appears to have been done with flours (wheat and rye) before. Seems that it's a way to get a toasty flavor out of something (bread crust type). I mostly pull up examples about Munich and Vienna malts that are kilned. I guess that makes sense since toasted rice flour has a different scent and flavor than rice flour with sugar and water in a dough.

I'll keep digging around.
Thanks!
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Old 02-02-2011, 02:40 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by BBBF View Post
Many of us roast unmalted, GF grains to add color and flavor to our beers. It sounds like the same thing, only using flour instead of whole grains. I read on another board about a guy making gluten free buns to brew with.
I was not sure if there was something special going on with the flour... maybe not.

That is a really interesting points about the GF buns. My wife has worked hard on a GF/Vegan bread. That may be the thing to try crumbling and toasting to add to the brew. It does have some vegetable oil... not sure if that would be an issue.

Thanks,
Jerry
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Old 02-02-2011, 03:38 AM   #6
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Great, not a whole lot found so far through other forums and reading material. From everything I'm finding, it's just a general term for some compounds created when roasting things. A type of Maillard reaction. http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/med/re...n/melanoidins/

I guess there's a question on if there's a noticable difference in the toasting with moisture and sugar than without for dry flourlike substances.
Bad example removed

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Old 02-02-2011, 12:40 PM   #7
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I recall reading something, I think from Australia, where a guy was making 'biscuits' out of gluten free stuff, roasting them to a desired level, then crushing them up...

Behold! The power of google:

http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/foru...howtopic=33936

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That's bread yeast. Look at it sitting there, all depressed. Listless. Beer yeast doesn't look like that. It has hopes. Dreams. Something to look forward to...

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Old 02-03-2011, 01:31 AM   #8
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x2 and x3. i remember that too darklord

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Old 02-03-2011, 01:51 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorklord View Post
I recall reading something, I think from Australia, where a guy was making 'biscuits' out of gluten free stuff, roasting them to a desired level, then crushing them up...

Behold! The power of google:

http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/foru...howtopic=33936
Interesting link. Thanks!
I guess it was offline this morning, but I was able to get to it now.

It definitely confirmed my main concern, that the fineness of the flour would be a pain in the butt.

Has anybody here actually tried toasting and using some kind of GF Bread/cracker/biscuit in a recipe? I am guessing that would need to be strained, but it would not be as difficult as flour.
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Old 02-03-2011, 04:06 PM   #10
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Thanks for posting the link. That's is the one I was thinking about.

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