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Old 01-24-2012, 02:13 PM   #161
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Can someone explain what this means?
"They mashed really well (104-140-160 with 30 minute cycles) "
Does that mean keep at 104°F for 30 min, then 140°F, then 160°F, each for 30 min?

I'd like to try adding some malted quinoa to the Gluten Free McGee recipe.

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Old 01-24-2012, 05:40 PM   #162
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Yep. 30 minutes at eact temperature.

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Old 01-24-2012, 06:13 PM   #163
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Great, thanks!

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Old 01-28-2012, 04:15 PM   #164
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do you have a website? I am interested.

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Old 01-28-2012, 04:18 PM   #165
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Do you have a website as I am interested in brewing your oats.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pilgeram View Post
Hi. I work at Montana State University with a focus on gluten-free crops and products. We were directly with a gluten-free production and processing company called Montana Gluten Free Processors. We are currently working with two gluten-free grains (Nude oats and Timothy). Traditional oats have a seed coating like barley. Some people with celiac disease have an adverse reaction to these oats. Nude oats are a related species and are naked like wheat. In a small study, 95% of the people who reacted to traditional oats did not react to nude oats. This company sells a number of gluten-free flours and mixes (best gluten-free bread, I have ever eaten!!!).

My questions are in regard to malt. We made malt from the gluten-free oats. To date, we have incorporated the oat malt into bread. The bread with malt has improved crust (It is crispier) and improved flavor. We want to find out if the oat malt can be used for production of beer. We approached several micro-breweries. They need a minimum of 200 pounds of malt.

I am hoping that there is a better approach. Would anyone be willing to work with us to evaluate the nude oats for beer malt production? I can make small quanities of malt but from the thread, I think that you are much better. The oats are gluten-free (all product coming in to the facility is tested using an immunological test). The product would come directly from the gluten-free facility. the facility is dedicated to gluten-free processing and is certified by the CSA (Celiac society of America).

We also work with a second gluten-free grain called Timothy. We have no information on malting. Thanks, Alice
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Old 01-29-2012, 03:37 PM   #166
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Default Oat Beer

Thanks Buff,
I hadn't realize my post was up. Has anyone made beer from oat malt? Did it worK?

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Old 01-29-2012, 05:08 PM   #167
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There's a post or two somewhere about people making 100% oat malt beer out of thomas fawcett oat malt.

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Old 02-12-2012, 01:19 AM   #168
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Thanks for the info on bluffwallace's technique, curious if you know how much extract (how many lbs or kilos) bluffwallace uses in his recipes (5gal batches). If not, if you can point me to some threads or recipes by some advanced GF brewers, I'm new to all this myself and have searched but see a lot of differing opinions and lots of unsure experiments. I know, "the newbie needs info, why can't he find it himself"!

Thanks in advance!

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Old 02-15-2012, 02:36 PM   #169
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Default 100% buckwheat Beer

I have been brewing for about 3 years now and over the past 8 months have been experimenting with GF brewing for a friend of mine.

My experience with sorgum malt brewing has been less than satisfying. I have tried 5 different batches and recipies and the end result has been very sweet and somewhat dissapointing. I have gotten good body and head retention but I continue to get a sweet citrus finish on the beers. My idea is to make a 100% buckwheat beer:

Malting hulled buckwheat as a base.
Roasting unhulled buckwheat a varying levels as specialty grains.

To all of you more experienced brewers please let me know your experience or concerns.

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Old 02-18-2012, 07:11 PM   #170
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I usually use 6 gallons of sorghum or rice syrup(Annapolis home brew) as a base (5-6 gallon batch) and I always use about 1-3 lbs of crused roasted grain (Quinoa (malts nicely), Millet, or buckwheat. I also use about 1-2 cups of molasses. sometimes I substitute the molasses with brown suger, honey, or blue agave. As for the sweet and citrus taste in the previous reply, try using different hops and use much more bitter hops w/high alpha acid. I always bitter with high alpha acid hops. the only time I get citrus taste is when I dry hop with Chinook for an IPA. Otherwise, I find that my beers are excellent if you bitter hop a little extra. for a 5 gal batch, I would use high alpha acid hops, 1 to 1.5 oz to bitter, 1 oz to flavor, and 1/2 oz for Aroma. For an Ipa, I bitter w/ high alpha acid hops (1 oz for 90 min), (.5 to 1oz for 60 min), 1 to 1.5 oz 30 min for flavor, 1 oz for 5 min for aroma and then I dry hop with 1.5 oz of leaf.

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