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Old 02-20-2011, 02:01 PM   #121
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Whole foods still has not gotten back with me regarding the storage and testing of their bulk grain millet. I think that may have been my problem. I ordered my new grain from eden foods, day 3 of malting looks great. They get their grain from north dakota and it is tested and properly stored. For the whole foods bulk grain prices ordering right from eden was actually cheaper anyway even with shipping.

http://www.edenfoods.com/store/produ...ucts_id=113035

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Old 03-07-2011, 02:07 PM   #122
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So since my wife almost certainly has Celiac (we find out later this month) I'm starting my own experiment malting GF grains. I got about a half a cup each of quinoa, millet, and amaranth from the Whole Foods bulk bins. Was hoping for buckwheat and sorghum as well, but no such luck.

I did a 10-hour soak with each, with a rinse and water change halfway through, and rinsed them once after straining them out. I did another rinse this morning, and I'm going to rinse again when I get home from work and then again before bed.

It has been less than 24 hours and the quinoa has already sprouted acrospires nearly double the size of the seeds. The amaranth appears to be doing something inside the seed but has not sprouted yet, and I can't really tell what's going on with the millet. It seems to really like to clump up into a thick, messy paste and doesn't strain well.

Now, I'm a little confused as to how to proceed from here. I guess I'm supposed to wait until the roots (not the acrospires) are 1.5x the length of the seed? And then what, I just toss them in the oven on low until they're dried out?

That seems right to me, but other people are starting at 175 and increasing by 25 degrees every so often, even putting them up as high as 400 degrees. Won't this kill the diastatic enzymes and prevent them from mashing?

If this works out well, I'll probably order 5-10 pounds of red and white quinoa and try to make a whole beer out of it. I can get you guys pictures, but my camera isn't great at close-ups.

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Old 03-07-2011, 04:23 PM   #123
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Default Wife w/ Celiac

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Originally Posted by bernerbrau View Post
So since my wife almost certainly has Celiac (we find out later this month) I'm starting my own experiment malting GF grains. ..........
That seems right to me, but other people are starting at 175 and increasing by 25 degrees every so often, even putting them up as high as 400 degrees. Won't this kill the diastatic enzymes and prevent them from mashing?
..........
I would set the oven about 200 and check the grain regularly until dry. If the grain STINKS (literally if it doesn't smell good don't use it). I had one of those grains smell bad when attempting to sprout. I did have pretty good luck with buckwheat though. I'm still experimenting but I would say that the higher temps are more for roasting than for creating dry malt.

One final tip gained from a doctor about determining whether you are Celiac or not. Stop eating any and all gluten products (which is a LOT of stuff). If the problems clear up then that is your "gold standard". I'm not celiac but I actually felt better when I was eating gluten free. Odd but true.
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:32 PM   #124
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I would set the oven about 200 and check the grain regularly until dry. If the grain STINKS (literally if it doesn't smell good don't use it). I had one of those grains smell bad when attempting to sprout. I did have pretty good luck with buckwheat though. I'm still experimenting but I would say that the higher temps are more for roasting than for creating dry malt.
Hmm, there was a bit of a smell from the quinoa. I didn't know if that was normal or not.

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One final tip gained from a doctor about determining whether you are Celiac or not. Stop eating any and all gluten products (which is a LOT of stuff). If the problems clear up then that is your "gold standard". I'm not celiac but I actually felt better when I was eating gluten free. Odd but true.
She gets itchy and swollen in her mouth and throat when she eats bread... her makeup makes her eyelids break out... sometimes she even itches when I kiss her after eating... some wines cause very bad reactions in small amounts that make her violently ill (turns out some of the cheaper wines use flour paste to seal cracks in their aging barrels)... and recently she's been getting these really bad rashes that very closely resemble DH. This weekend when she broke out, she went off gluten for a couple days and started taking folic acid supplements (marked gluten free), and the symptoms seemed to improve.

The stupid thing is she's had milder forms of the rash on and off for years now, and her lady doctor just prescribed topical antibiotics and said it was normal.
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Old 03-07-2011, 05:45 PM   #125
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It has been less than 24 hours and the quinoa has already sprouted acrospires nearly double the size of the seeds. The amaranth appears to be doing something inside the seed but has not sprouted yet, and I can't really tell what's going on with the millet. It seems to really like to clump up into a thick, messy paste and doesn't strain well.

Now, I'm a little confused as to how to proceed from here. I guess I'm supposed to wait until the roots (not the acrospires) are 1.5x the length of the seed? And then what, I just toss them in the oven on low until they're dried out?
I've successfully malted quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat. The quinoa will be sprout a couple days before the amaranth, so your time frame is similar to what I have experienced. You won't get roots like you would get if you were malting barley. You'll have to make a judgement based off the sprouts. I aim for 1.5 to 2 X's the length of the grain, but I'm not claiming to know the proper lenth.

Next, you want to dry the grain out. I use a dehydrator at the lowest setting. The lower the better. You definately do not want to go above 175 because you will be destroying enzymes. If you want flavor and color from roasted grains, roast some unmalted grains instead.
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Old 03-07-2011, 07:00 PM   #126
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I've successfully malted quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat. The quinoa will be sprout a couple days before the amaranth, so your time frame is similar to what I have experienced. You won't get roots like you would get if you were malting barley. You'll have to make a judgement based off the sprouts. I aim for 1.5 to 2 X's the length of the grain, but I'm not claiming to know the proper lenth.
So you think it might already be time to dry the quinoa when I get home then? Have you had them ready within 24 hours?

And once they're dried, do I need to do anything else or is the malt stage done?
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Old 03-07-2011, 11:21 PM   #127
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So you think it might already be time to dry the quinoa when I get home then? Have you had them ready within 24 hours?

And once they're dried, do I need to do anything else or is the malt stage done?
Quinoa is pretty fast, but I can't say if 24 hours is enough. There are a lot of variables that play into the germination rate (temperature, moisture content, light, the grain itself).

After it's dry, you'll want to break off the little sprouts. I think everyone here just puts the grain into a pillow case (tied shut) and puts in in the dryer (fluff - no heat) for a while. Then you can shake the grain in a colander to get rid of the acrospires.
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Old 03-08-2011, 12:01 AM   #128
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Yeah, but these acrospires are looooooong now.

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Old 03-08-2011, 03:41 PM   #129
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I spread out the quinoa to air this morning. Oven only goes down to 170, so I'm going to put it on the highest rack for 30 minutes then leave it in there while the oven cools, and repeat until dry.

Someone mentioned not using it if it smells bad, but what is "bad"? Right now it sort of smells like alfalfa sprouts. That doesn't strike me as abnormal...

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Old 03-08-2011, 07:33 PM   #130
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I spread out the quinoa to air this morning. Oven only goes down to 170, so I'm going to put it on the highest rack for 30 minutes then leave it in there while the oven cools, and repeat until dry.

Someone mentioned not using it if it smells bad, but what is "bad"? Right now it sort of smells like alfalfa sprouts. That doesn't strike me as abnormal...
Vinegar would be abnormal.
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