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Old 02-04-2013, 01:16 AM   #1
the_rayway
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Default Looking for a gluten free malty beer, can anyone help?

Hi All,
I'm totally new to the idea of brewing my own beer, although I've been making wine from scratch for a little while now.

Since being diagnosed as a Celiac (10 years ago), I have been craving a huge-bodied, super-malty, slightly sweet and low-to-mid hopped beer. Does anyone have a recipe or two they would be willing to share? I'm thinking something along the lines of a cream or a brown.

Any and all help is appreciated!
Ray

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Old 02-04-2013, 01:20 AM   #2
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Cream will not be super-malty.

A porter or scotch ale sounds a little more like what you're looking for.

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Old 02-04-2013, 01:33 AM   #3
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Subscribing to this because I fear what you are asking for doesn't exist and I'm hoping someone will prove that wrong. I've had several gluten free beers and none were even remotely malty. More like a saison than anything. You can have nuts correct? Maybe you could heavily roast some pecans or hazelnuts or something to get the roast that sorghum won't get you.

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Old 02-04-2013, 04:34 AM   #4
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I've tried everything short of malting my own grains, and have yet to see success. That includes nuts, all-grain using unmalted grains with commercial-grade enzymes, every extract and sugar-source known to man, fruits, vegetables, you name it. I've got an order of malted buckwheat on the way, and I intend to try some oat malt soon as well, but my hopes are not high.

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Old 02-04-2013, 07:17 AM   #5
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You may have better luck with malting your own grains. But even then, it isn't going to be the 'maltiness' you are looking for. It's not going to taste like barely malt. It's going to taste like Buckwheat malt or Millet Malt or quinoa malt. Which unfortunately is just something you are going to have to get to like. At a last push, and if you are willing, I believe there is a thing called Clarity ferm? This can be used in Barley beers to 'reduce' the gluten content. Though I would believe that this could and probably would still effect people.

Due to the amount of sugar fermentable products being used as replacements for malted grains, the beers you do are probably going to turn out dryer. Although it may sound strange, I have had more malt-like flavours from using more crystal buckwheat malt, then using golden syrup in it, rather than a little bit of crystal and a little bit of malt. Worth a try for you?

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Old 02-04-2013, 11:25 AM   #6
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Igliashon,


Have you tried using chesnuts in your brews yet? I keep meaning to order some and give the overnight mash a try.

I hear try impart a maltyness close to barley but have yet to try a beer from harvester

How is the maltyness in their beers compared to other gf beers and Homebrew you have made

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Old 02-04-2013, 02:38 PM   #7
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Hmmm, it looks like I'm going to be in for quite the ride!

I wonder if it will be like GF baking: the more different types of grains/starches etc. that you include, the closer you get to an approximation of 'real bread'. If you just use buckwheat, or rice flour, it always tastes exactly like that.

It looks like this will require much more research than I had anticipated

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Old 02-04-2013, 02:46 PM   #8
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mtbskier--I actually just ordered another case of Harvester beers, and cracked open a Red Ale last night. It's much better than the first case I got, in which the beers had an ashy/tobacco kind of aftertaste that was very unpleasant. The chestnuts definitely add a nice flavor, but I would not describe it as "malty" or "barley-like". It was a good beer and I enjoyed it, definitely one of the best on the commercial market (I hesitate to compare it to my homebrew because I've never made a red ale), but it would never fool anyone looking for that barley flavor. I do plan to give chestnuts a try, though; I like what they add to the Harvester beers and think I could improve on their recipes. They still rely on sorghum extract and cane sugar quite heavily, so I'm gonna try something with malted buckwheat, sprouted quinoa, chestnuts, and buckwheat honey. If that doesn't get me close to the kind of maltiness I'm after, I'm probably going to give up on the more malt-forward styles and go for beers that feature the other ingredients more. I remember tasting my girlfriend's pint of Arrogant Bastard the other night and thinking I could probably approximate it fairly well. The higher-alcohol beers give away a lot of their maltiness to a general alcoholic sweetness, which I've been able to replicate just fine with some of my beers.

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Old 02-04-2013, 03:21 PM   #9
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Hey igliashon - would you mind sharing that Agave-Vanilla Cream Ale recipe? It sounds yummy! (I couldn't find it on your blog site...which is great BTW!)

Ray

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Old 02-04-2013, 05:49 PM   #10
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Sure thing, Ray! It was a real crowd-pleaser, though I should note that the vanilla flavor definitely fades with time--it's real strong at first (for the first month in bottles) but mellows more and more the longer you wait.

I call it:

Verano Perpetuo Summer Ale

3 gallon batch (multiply all ingredients by 5/3 to make a 5-gallon batch, except the yeast)
60 minute boil

1 lb Liquid Sorghum Extract, added at end of boil
1 lb Rice Syrup Solids, added at beginning of boil
1 lb Amber Agave Syrup, added at beginning of boil
12 oz Clover Honey, added at end of boil

0.5 oz Ahtanum hops, 5.3% AA, add at start of boil
0.5 oz Ahtanum hops, add at last 5 minutes of boil
1 oz Crystal hops, add at last 5 minutes of boil

1 tab Whirlfloc
US-05 Yeast
0.5 oz Vanilla extract, added to bottling sugar
(I originally intended to add some homemade extract of jasmine tea at bottling time as well, but decided to play it safe. Next time, I'll add the jasmine tea instead of the vanilla and see how it goes; I think it would be nice).

Target OG: 1.046
Target FG: 1.008

When it's young, it does have a slight tequila flavor, which I liked. It's a very light, crisp, refreshing summer quencher. It is not remotely malty, nor is it cidery or soda-like; it's its own thing, and I was quite happy with it. The hop flavor was really nice.

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