Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Kolsch with Bard's Malt
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-07-2012, 10:09 PM   #11
igliashon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 926
Liked 62 Times on 41 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by philber View Post
Good to know. I am a fan of Porters and Stouts and I was looking to create/follow a recipe that would get me to the taste of Bards retail beer. I really like the light chocolate, medium ale taste they have. But at $10 a six pack in my area, most stores only have one six pack, I need to brew this one!
What Bard's are you drinking? The only Bard's I've ever seen is a light lager, which I would not remotely describe as "light chocolate, medium ale". Their website only lists the one kind, their golden lager, so I'm real curious what you're drinking!
__________________
igliashon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-14-2012, 06:46 AM   #12
JeffLebowski
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 5
Likes Given: 1

Default Gluten Free Kolsch Yeast

As a follow up to this excellent thread, I thought I'd post some thoughts. I'm new to GF brewing but have been trying to make some that are drinkable or even better for some GF-intolerant and Celiac friends.

1) I'm currently preparing to make a Gluten Free "Kolsch" for a buddy who is Celiac. Although Kolsch yeast (2565) do not come GF, I have made mine GF via 4 serial 1:20 passages (1:160,000 dilution) using some 1.030 Sorghum wort that I quickly boiled up. I recommend this approach if making a GF Kolsch for someone of unknown sensitivity to Gluten or anyone who has Celiac.

2) I'm using the Briess Sorghum syrup. I agree about the taste that it produces not being much like beer. I tried a Sierra Pale Ale clone with it last month and so far it tastes like grapefruit juice mixed with rocket fuel. I'm hopeful that it will mellow in the bottle.

3) Related to point #2 above, 1.068 (as produced by the OP) is very high for a lawnmower beer like Kolsch. I'm shooting for something much closer to 1.045, which is what I try to hit exactly in my true "to style" partial mash Kolsch recipes that I drink for myself. I'm wondering if making lower gravity beers with Sorghum syrup might actually allow for a slightly better, less bitter beer. I'm definitely interested in others experiences in this regard.

Thanks,
The Dude

__________________
JeffLebowski is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-14-2012, 05:49 PM   #13
igliashon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 926
Liked 62 Times on 41 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffLebowski View Post
3)I'm wondering if making lower gravity beers with Sorghum syrup might actually allow for a slightly better, less bitter beer. I'm definitely interested in others experiences in this regard.
I've gotten my best results in the lawnmower style doing a 2:2:1 or 1:2:1 sorghum:rice:honey blend. Honey is a really important addition in gluten-free brewing, as depending on the variety used, it can add complexity, depth, and either sweetness or dryness. Use the high-quality raw/unfiltered stuff for the best effect. I doubt I will ever brew a GF lawnmower-type beer without honey ever again.

I'm about to experiment with Briess High-Maltose Brown Rice syrup, next week probably, doing a clone of mloster's "Hop-Bursted Pale Ale", which uses no sorghum. I've heard good things about this stuff both from mloster himself and from the proprietors of highgravitybrew.com, the only place I've been able to find the stuff. My spider-senses tell me it's gonna be great for lighter-colored beers.
__________________
igliashon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-14-2012, 07:51 PM   #14
JeffLebowski
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 5
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by igliashon View Post
I've gotten my best results in the lawnmower style doing a 2:2:1 or 1:2:1 sorghum:rice:honey blend. Honey is a really important addition in gluten-free brewing, as depending on the variety used, it can add complexity, depth, and either sweetness or dryness. Use the high-quality raw/unfiltered stuff for the best effect. I doubt I will ever brew a GF lawnmower-type beer without honey ever again.
Thanks for the insights. Actually, I was planning a "honey Kolsch" with 4:1 sorghum:honey. Maybe I should consider increasing the proportion of honey or replacing some of the sorghum with rice. I haven't tried that previously. I'm also planning to add the honey late, ~15 minutes before flameout. I assume you're doing the honey as a late addition also?

I also appreciate the tip about the raw honey. I've been using the Safeway brand, which is filtered but will now pick up some of the raw stuff from the honey guy at the Montclair Farmers Market.
__________________
JeffLebowski is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-14-2012, 10:25 PM   #15
igliashon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 926
Liked 62 Times on 41 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffLebowski View Post
Thanks for the insights. Actually, I was planning a "honey Kolsch" with 4:1 sorghum:honey. Maybe I should consider increasing the proportion of honey or replacing some of the sorghum with rice. I haven't tried that previously. I'm also planning to add the honey late, ~15 minutes before flameout. I assume you're doing the honey as a late addition also?

I also appreciate the tip about the raw honey. I've been using the Safeway brand, which is filtered but will now pick up some of the raw stuff from the honey guy at the Montclair Farmers Market.
Whoa, didn't realize you were Bay Area, too! I'm in Oakland, let me know if you ever want to trade bottles! My stash is a little low right now but I do have plenty of my GF stout on hand.

And yah, I do honey at 5 minutes to flameout, or right at flameout if I really want its aroma. Be warned, though--the raw stuff can sometimes be overpowering, depending on the source. Some honey is really mild and you can use up to 1/3-lb per gallon; some honey, like chestnut, is so assertive that even 1/8-lb per gallon could be too much. Taste and smell the honey first; if it's got a real strong aroma/taste, go easy at first.
__________________
igliashon is offline
beljica Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-16-2012, 01:51 AM   #16
beljica
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Chewelah, Washington
Posts: 57
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I put honey in my lake beer. 6lbs white sorghum 4 white rice and some toasted millet hand full of oats 115/15 mins 125/15 mins 154 for 60. Honey at flame out.

__________________
beljica is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gluten Free Bard's Homebrewing Kit. midwestsupplies Gluten Free Brewing 6 08-22-2011 09:20 PM
Bard's Homebrew Kit BBBF Gluten Free Brewing 5 07-01-2011 05:59 PM
Advice on recipe required - Rice malt and Sorghum malt spaced Gluten Free Brewing 32 03-03-2011 08:27 PM
Oat Malt pintail78 Gluten Free Brewing 12 01-07-2011 06:56 PM
Tapioca malt? Dustwing Gluten Free Brewing 20 05-01-2010 11:11 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS