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-   -   Keg and Force Carbing Question (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/keg-force-carbing-question-367978/)

tigerface 11-15-2012 06:29 PM

Keg and Force Carbing Question
 
Just thinking. You know that tube in Cornelius keg where the input for c02 is like 1 inch long. Wouldn't it make a lot more sense if that c02 tube runs all the way in where beer is being carbed. Or at least a portion of the way in. :mug:

igliashon 11-15-2012 08:29 PM

Did you mean to post this in the gluten-free forum, mate?

tigerface 11-15-2012 09:08 PM

I am a Gluten Free brewer but this question could go for Non-gluten free brewers as well.

ale-e-chest 11-16-2012 04:16 AM

It probably wouldn't matter if it were to go into the beer, it's probably just a cost thing for the keg manufacturer. I've heard of people doing a quick carb by hooking up the gas to the outlet point. I've done a quick carb by gassing up then inverting the keg a couple of times then repeating about 4 times.

frothdaddy 11-16-2012 12:50 PM

It would probably make sense to put the CO2 input down into the brew if the CO2 were bubbling away the whole time and the keg wasn't under pressure. (Like using an O2 diffusion stone.) But, once you turn on your CO2 input, the keg reaches pressure, and then the CO2 flow into the keg is dramatically slower, only seeping in to equalize the pressure as the CO2 is dissolved into the solution.

DougmanXL 11-16-2012 08:17 PM

Also I think it's short on purpose to prevent beer from getting into the co2 line easily. If you tip the keg or if you lower the pressure on the regulator and bleed co2 from it (instead of the keg lid) beer can get into the co2 line.

KuntzBrewing 11-16-2012 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DougmanXL
Also I think it's short on purpose to prevent beer from getting into the co2 line easily. If you tip the keg or if you lower the pressure on the regulator and bleed co2 from it (instead of the keg lid) beer can get into the co2 line.

+1 I think thats the exact reason
When i first put my beer in the keg i hook the gas line to the out tube and put the gas in direct contact with the beer also i leave my relief valve open to purge any oxygen out. Then close it and pressurize it. So the whole time the beer is being bubbled with co2.

spaced 11-16-2012 09:06 PM

What I do is unscrew my gas connection, screw in an outlet connection in it's place, force to 300kpa and shake the keg back and forth hard. N.B. the keg must be cold.

Then I leave it from 1 to 7 days before drinking it. The longer it sits the better it tastes.

This is the type of connection you'll need.

http://www.craftbrewer.com.au/shop/details.asp?PID=730

robodeath 11-16-2012 10:39 PM

Am I the only person that doesnt force carb?

muench1 11-17-2012 07:21 PM

If you have a drop tube for your CO2 and use a diffusion stone you can force carb a lot faster/easier and the diffusion stone should do a pretty good job of preventing backflow up the tube.

Lastly as a heads up, this should have been posted in the Bottling/Kegging forum, unless it was somehow specific to gluten-free brewing. It's a forum etiquette thing, along with searching for answers instead of making a new thread (you broke that one too, the forum has automatically generated links to similar threads at the bottom of the page for you :)).


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