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Old 12-08-2011, 08:15 PM   #11
cimirie
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Spaced brings up a good point - and one not related only to brewing. Depending on the degree of Celiac's disease, you may not have to worry. I have one friend who is assured to go to the ER if food is even prepared in a room where gluten food is prepared. Another is OK as long as there isn't gluten products in the food she consume. Some people are even less affected.

Judging by the fact that you stated you just "found out" and had been regularly ingesting gluten products recently (ie beer) I would say your current utensils are fine. If I'm wrong, however, it may be wise to replace everything.

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Old 12-08-2011, 08:17 PM   #12
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I've been having acid reflux for years, but no major issues until recently. Up until monday I was eating pasta and bread. So currently, a bit of gluten isn't a problem for me. I imagine once my intestines heal they will be more sensitive to gluten, but apparently that can take up to a couple of years.

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Old 12-08-2011, 11:31 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by The_Fuzz View Post
I've been having acid reflux for years, but no major issues until recently. Up until monday I was eating pasta and bread. So currently, a bit of gluten isn't a problem for me. I imagine once my intestines heal they will be more sensitive to gluten, but apparently that can take up to a couple of years.
This is definitely the case. I used to be able to tolerate gluten, and when it was making me sick (before I knew what was causing it) it would take say 12 hours to come on. Now I can have a reaction in less than 4. Certain substances just an hour.

The thing with gluten is that the sooner you cut it out as a celiac, the sooner you stop damaging your body. Also if your intestine is damaged in any way, its affecting your ability to absorb nutrients (well the ones absorbed in your intestinal tract at least).

I share pots and pans with my wife who isn't gluten free and that's fine. I do keep seperate chopping boards though (as they're plastic). I would keep what you have for now (except fermenters) but if you find you're still sick you might need to replace some items.

Beers I've really enjoyed since brewing myself has been some wheat style beers, american style pale ales and IPA's. Centennial IPA was awesome, and I've got a Cascade IPA on the way which should be great. I've heard Lagers are good gluten free but I'm not setup for climate control yet.
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Old 12-09-2011, 02:50 AM   #14
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I liked my lager from last year. Some find them more palatable than ales. Mine from last years had a decent review by some regular drinkers, at places where they have lots of craft beer like Ashley's Home. Most couldn't tell, and one person I told ahead of time had to look for the sorgum flavor, though I did use more rice syrup than I did sorghum, and half a pound of honey.

Living in a cold climate helps for the climate control, at least the chilling part. Outside my apartment is where they keep the water heater and the furnace (and AC unit), so last year, I fermented the lager out there.

Same here. I can even handle some sharing, for example burger, no bun, no spreadables (mayo etc), no fries if the place does other fried food, and I'd expect that there would have been some gluten items on the grill. And I'm ok as long as I don't do that often. Less to worry about when I can find a place with a dedicated grill though.

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Old 12-10-2011, 10:32 PM   #15
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Kevin, you have a recipe for that lager?


Today was a sad day, just bottled a dutch lager and racked my redwood ale. I've got about 150 bottles of gluten rich beer to give away!

On a positive note, before I get a biopsy test I am supposed to go back on gluten for a week. So I'm gonna enjoy the hell outa as many of these beers as I can!

Just trying on of the commercial gluten free beers. Gotta say, its not very good.

For that Mcgee recipe, the only thing I couldn't find was the rice flakes (pre-gelatinized). I did find some brown rice flakes, but I'm not sure what the pre-gelatinzed bit means? I also read in another thread that maybe I could substitute minute rice? Anyone familiar with that, or can I use the brown rice flakes?

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Old 12-11-2011, 11:38 PM   #16
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There's very few out there right now, which is just one of the reasons we're all into doing this I think.
Pre-gelatnized tends to mean that it's already been gelatanized (partially cooked, like minute rice) as far as I know. You'll still need to convert the starch to sugars of course.

My numbers were a bit sloppy last year, but I'm fairly sure it was 3 jars of rice syrup (approx 3 lbs 15oz, lundberg) and two varied containers of sorghum extract approx 2lbs 12 oz.
1oz Saaz @ 60
.5 oz Saas @ 15
8 oz honey @ 5
Corn sugar for carbonation.
I brewed this in feburary and set it outside in a keg with a blowoff tube, and let it ferment out in my AC/heating unit. Then racked into another keg where corn sugar was added to acheive the carbonation. It wasn't that temperature stable out there, but it was enough that it turned out pretty well. While above freezing, it was still cold enough to cause a drawn out fermentation and next time I'm going to try wrapping it in a blanket or thermal keg/carboy jacket. Was best after June apparently. I have notes saying that I could taste the honey at that point. I'll probably do something similar once I determine the average temperature out there. The apartment complex replaced the AC/furnace unit out there with a different make.

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Kegged&Ready: GF Orange&Coriander, GF Honey Lager, GF chocolate ale, GF English ale, Island mist (zinfandel), Island mist (cbry malbec).
Bottled: Infected Mead, Dry Hard ciders, Accidental Sorghumwine, various unnamed.

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Old 12-12-2011, 01:19 AM   #17
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Please forgive me as I have never brewed anything except kits. When you say "still convert the starch to sugars" I assume that is what this step does:
"Heat 3 gal H20 to 160F and steep rice flakes for 30 mins, holding liquid around 160F." or is there something else I would need to do to the minute rice?

All your talk about temperature control, how cool is ideal to ferment lager? I live up in the frozen north for 6 months of the year, my basement is about 60°F. Would that work?

Thanks!

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Old 12-12-2011, 03:27 AM   #18
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The thing about grains, including rice that has been gelatinized, is that they are starch. Starch is converted to sugar due to enzymes. See How to Brew - By John Palmer - Brewing Your First All-Grain Beer There's a bit to it, but without enzymes, nothing will happen to the starch. It stays starch. Starch isn't fermentable. Sugar is.
So, without an enzyme source, the rice really won't do much, but create a starch haze and maybe some flavor (if it's roasted). Normally, for gluten able brewers, the enzyme source is contained within barley. For us, we have to find our own malted grain, or add amylase. However the obtainable amylase is alpha. So you may wish to add some alpha amylase to the rice steep.

As for the temperature, it depends on the yeast. For example, fermentis/saflager says their S23 has an optimal flavor range of 9c-15c, ideally 12c. (48-59F). It's not impossible to go outside of those ranges however, it's just that the target flavor may wind up being different. I'd think that 60 should be fine, though if you have a basement and you can really seal it to keep heat from going down there too much, it ought to drop a few degrees.

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Primary: Sake
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Waiting to be kegged, Italian Primitivo
Kegged&Ready: GF Orange&Coriander, GF Honey Lager, GF chocolate ale, GF English ale, Island mist (zinfandel), Island mist (cbry malbec).
Bottled: Infected Mead, Dry Hard ciders, Accidental Sorghumwine, various unnamed.

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Old 12-13-2011, 03:45 AM   #19
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FYI, don't use any of your old stuff (fermenters, spoons etc) for gluten free beer. Buy brand new stuff.

Metal and glass is ok to reuse if it hasn't got any scratches. What types of beers did you like to drink before getting your diagnosis?

I'm 3+ years in as a Celiac and 1 year in as a gluten free brewer. This year has definitely been the most fun
Had you noticed effects from re-used equipment? Or is this a bit of extra caution?
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Old 12-13-2011, 05:16 AM   #20
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Had you noticed effects from re-used equipment? Or is this a bit of extra caution?
More so extra caution. Have only been sick off one batch but I've put that down to using a different brand of yeast. That's why I stick so tightly to fermentis brand.

I replaced that fermenter just to be safe.
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Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

All gluten free.

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