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Old 12-14-2010, 05:41 PM   #11
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You really shouldn't have to use gelatin every batch, although you can. I don't think filtering the hot and cold break or even hops out of the fermenter will really help, although I do. I do it for reasons of room in my fermenters though.

In any case, the last thing I would be worried about is clarity in these beers. Once we nail down what makes em taste good, we can worry about how they look. I made a beer that looked exactly like milk, but it tasted nice and light!
Well I think the clear beers taste better- A LOT BETTER- I think my cloudy beers have suspended sorghum proteins and yeast in the beer and once you get those suspended proteins out of the beer then that takes a lot (if not all) of the sorghum taste out. I use at least 2 lbs of buckwheat roasted at different temps (to get different flavors) and make a really strong tea before adding the extract etc and I think the roasted buckwheat tastes more like a real beer. That is just what I have experienced. But then again I dont leave my beer in the secondary for more than 3 weeks so maybe i need to leave it in longer? I also keg and dont bottle and I know that the priming sugars used to bottle eat up the yeast still in the beer to make it carbonated. So maybe that has something to do with it as well?


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Old 12-14-2010, 05:45 PM   #12
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Well I think the clear beers taste better- A LOT BETTER- I think my cloudy beers have suspended sorghum proteins and yeast in the beer and once you get those suspended proteins out of the beer then that takes a lot (if not all) of the sorghum taste out. I use at least 2 lbs of buckwheat roasted at different temps (to get different flavors) and make a really strong tea before adding the extract etc and I think the roasted buckwheat tastes more like a real beer. That is just what I have experienced. But then again I dont leave my beer in the secondary for more than 3 weeks so maybe i need to leave it in longer?
Tough to say on whether the suspended crap in beer is the problem or not. Side by side is the only way to really know...

Anyway, I have not noticed a correlation to Sorghum flavor and clarity. I have drank beer made entirely from Sorghum and more than a year old that had more sorghum flavor than a young, unclear beer. I have also tasted the opposite.


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Old 12-14-2010, 06:14 PM   #13
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Yeah I hear ya. That is just my opinion that the clear beers taste better. IMO they are more crisp but each to their own!

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Old 12-14-2010, 06:30 PM   #14
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Yeah I hear ya. That is just my opinion that the clear beers taste better. IMO they are more crisp but each to their own!
It is my experience with glutenous beers that with certain styles clear is better and certain styles the suspended stuff makes it taste better.

While this may or may not apply to GF beers, I do not think the sorghum flavor is a result of an unclear beer. Usually clarity affects the flavors given off by a yeast more than anything else.
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Old 12-14-2010, 06:35 PM   #15
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It is my experience with glutenous beers that with certain styles clear is better and certain styles the suspended stuff makes it taste better.

While this may or may not apply to GF beers, I do not think the sorghum flavor is a result of an unclear beer. Usually clarity affects the flavors given off by a yeast more than anything else.
Got ya- it might be the yeast that I am tasting... is that a result of not bottling and letting the priming sugars eat the yeast?
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Old 12-14-2010, 06:49 PM   #16
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Got ya- it might be the yeast that I am tasting... is that a result of not bottling and letting the priming sugars eat the yeast?
Not sure what you mean here...do you mean is the taste of yeast stronger in a bottle conditioned beer? The answer would be no, unless you shake the yeast back into suspension. You could do the same with a keg though, but they are heavier.
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Old 12-14-2010, 06:53 PM   #17
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Not sure what you mean here...do you mean is the taste of yeast stronger in a bottle conditioned beer? The answer would be no, unless you shake the yeast back into suspension. You could do the same with a keg though, but they are heavier.
Well I force carb my beer and dont use priming sugar- and when you bottle you use priming sugar that eats the yeast to make carbonation- so I was wondering if bottling it and the sugars eating the yeasts would make the beer taste less like yeast... not sure if that makes sense.

I will try to bottle my next batch and see what happens.
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Old 12-14-2010, 07:04 PM   #18
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Well I force carb my beer and dont use priming sugar- and when you bottle you use priming sugar that eats the yeast to make carbonation- so I was wondering if bottling it and the sugars eating the yeasts would make the beer taste less like yeast... not sure if that makes sense.

I will try to bottle my next batch and see what happens.
Yeast eat sugar, poop alcohol, and fart CO2.

Feeding yeast more sugar would only increase the number of yeast, not decrease. This would probably have no effect on the yeast flavor though, especially not in such a small amount.

Fermentation temperature affects yeast flavor more than any other single variable, well besides type of yeast.
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Old 12-15-2010, 12:46 AM   #19
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Yeast eat sugar, poop alcohol, and fart CO2.

Feeding yeast more sugar would only increase the number of yeast, not decrease. This would probably have no effect on the yeast flavor though, especially not in such a small amount.

Fermentation temperature affects yeast flavor more than any other single variable, well besides type of yeast.

Can you explain this a little for me- Does the higher or lower fermentation temp increase yeast flavor in the ales that I am brewing?

Also does using Irish Moss change flavor or ABV? This thread has me thinking
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Old 12-15-2010, 03:22 PM   #20
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Can you explain this a little for me- Does the higher or lower fermentation temp increase yeast flavor in the ales that I am brewing?

Also does using Irish Moss change flavor or ABV? This thread has me thinking
Well, it's not all increase or decrease, but more change. In general though, a higher temperature will produce more esters, which is essentially yeast flavor. High enough and you start producing fusel alcohols, which don't taste very good. The lower the temperature, the "cleaner" the taste.

The actual temperatures will vary by type of yeast.

Irish moss is just seaweed...or algae, one of those two. Either way, it just grabs onto suspended yeast and other compounds and drags em down into the trub. Shouldn't change flavor at all, at least not that anyone would notice.


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