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Old 07-12-2012, 01:04 AM   #11
dtanders
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Looks GREAT! How about the whole recipe??? Thanks

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Old 07-12-2012, 07:12 AM   #12
thanantos
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I only wish this entire thread weren't completely over my head.

I've been putting off the hours of Google searching it will take to understand it, but its been bugging me for a while.

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Old 07-12-2012, 11:41 PM   #13
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It's actually not that difficult to understand. I basically dump the grains into boiling water then cool to 125 degrees where I hold it for 10-15 minutes then 135 for 15 minutes and then heat the grains again to 152 and keep it there for an hour to 2 hours. To increase the temperature you just add boiling water to the grains and stir. Below is a link to calculate how much water per temperature.
http://www.brewersfriend.com/mash/
The enzymes I used are
Protease (creates Free Amino Nitrogen)
Beta Glucanase (breaks down the grains a little more)
Amylase (makes sugar).

The reason for the different temperatures is that gluten free grains are UNmodified and in order to fully utilize them you need to go a step farther then with barley.

Also RICE HULLS a ton of them.

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Old 09-23-2012, 02:26 PM   #14
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Thanks for the explanation. I missed it before.

I will be picking up a grinder soon and hope to start working on some AG brews.

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Old 10-13-2012, 02:46 AM   #15
aggiecowgirl12
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ok hang on, did you sprout the sorghum first? whats an exact measurement for the rice hulls? how many days does it need to ferment? We will be kegging, do you have any advice for time frames before needing to keg? Our first beer was a syrup lager (yuck) and I want to get into strictly all grain beer, specifically gluten free. I dont want to experiment with insane flavors, I want nice perfectly balanced lagers, some ambers, and light to amber ales.... maybe later I'll get into the pumpkin beers and whatnot...

Anyway, can you give me some more specifics in regards to initial boiling temp? what yeast did you use? what temp did it ferment at... etc etc etc etc, I love detail!

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Old 10-13-2012, 10:17 PM   #16
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Boiling temp was 212 degrees. Yeast was 05 and fermentation was 62. It takes about 15 days to get a beer in the keg if it finishes quickly and then in my opinion about another week for the carbonation to really set. You can carbonate in a few hours but the bubbles become finer the longer it sits. In palmers book you will find information on the ratio of barley hulls in malt so just emulate that to your grist.

This beer was made using a more advanced style of brewing called decoction mashing. It is more difficult to work with. I also used commercial enzymes that helped with filtration and saccrification. With out betaglucanase your mash will get stuck and you will become frustrated.

Good luck and you can purchase thee book on brewing by Palmer on amazon.

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