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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Help me understand GF Brewing!
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Old 12-16-2009, 05:30 PM   #11
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There is no real need, in my opinion, to make special allowances for sorghum taste or worry much about whether it tastes like a barley based beer. In my opinion, it stands just fine on its own.
Time definitely helps.

I have a pumpkin GF spice ale that is about 3 months old now and there is no trace of sorghum flavors in the beer anymore.

I also have a belgian tripel (much lighter in flavor) that is about 4 months old and still tastes of sorghum.

As to your recipe, most people would consider 4oz of hops in a 5gal recipe trying to 'hide' the sorghum flavor. In my pale in which I was trying to hide the flavor I only used 3oz. After only 2 weeks in bottles the flavor is faint, and I can tell it will age out by the new year, but if this was a tripel, it would still be apparent in that time range.
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Old 12-16-2009, 05:37 PM   #12
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...As to your recipe, most people would consider 4oz of hops in a 5gal recipe trying to 'hide' the sorghum flavor...
No more than my usual five or six ounces in barley based pale ales are intended to hide the barley taste!

Gee, I thought I was going light to accomodate the non-hop heads who might drink it!
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Old 12-16-2009, 05:41 PM   #13
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No more than my usual five or six ounces in barley based pale ales are intended to hide the barley taste!

Gee, I thought I was going light to accomodate the non-hop heads who might drink it!
Hey, I'm with you. But I am brewing this for people who haven't had barley beer long before the IPA-craze hit us.
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Old 12-16-2009, 06:43 PM   #14
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Anything made from wheat, rye, and barley contains gluten. Its a questionable matter but it seems like oats are probably safe, but contamined from shared fields and equipment. There are a couple companies that produce gluten free oats.

I also disagree with the flow chart when it says "up to 2ppm gluten" from using white labs. The yeast slurry from WL is 12ppm. We don't know what amount out of gluten contamination has gotten into the sorghum syrup. If its zero, then "up to 2ppm" might be accurate. Its probably unlikely that the sorghum syrup has no traces of gluten in it either, just that it has under 20ppm. I think "at least 2ppm gluten" would be more accurate but thats a side issue. I think the important thing is that fermentis yeast is safe, white labs tubes carry a bit more risk even if they are technically gluten free.

This is the real risk factor here in general to me that consumers should know. It looks like testing under 20ppm will be able to be labeled gluten free. That might not cause a reaction in most people, but maybe I'd be one of the unlucky ones it does. I think there's also some risk in consumption. Maybe I can consume 24 oz of 4ppm beer a day without getting sick. Maybe I can't handle 48 oz of it, or maybe I can't handle the 24 oz when I also have some "gluten-free" food that is 18ppm. Bottom line I think its important to make your customers know that gluten free doesn't mean 100% gluten free. It means reduced gluten. Make sure they're aware there is a risk, help them understand how to minimize it, and make sure they understand you realize its a serious health issue and that you don't want to see them sick from beer either.

Most people find their GF brews ferment out very thoroughly andlike to add 8oz of maltodextrin for body and an attempt at a little head. Most people find a citrus taste is left from sorghum. I think the secret is going to be getting creative with adjuncts, yeast, etc. From my experimentaton so far I think its going to be easier to capture the spirit of good beers that heavily emphasize hoppy characteristics and spices more than it will be to really capture the malty goodness of something like a mild/brown.

Ymmv, and put some pressure on malters to produce some gluten free speciality grains!


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Old 12-16-2009, 06:52 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by dkershner View Post
Time definitely helps.

I have a pumpkin GF spice ale that is about 3 months old now and there is no trace of sorghum flavors in the beer anymore.

I also have a belgian tripel (much lighter in flavor) that is about 4 months old and still tastes of sorghum...
I agree, my pumpkin spice ale definitely has mellowed out and the sorghum isn't really there. The tripel sounds interesting though!

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Most people find their GF brews ferment out very thoroughly andlike to add 8oz of maltodextrin for body and an attempt at a little head. Most people find a citrus taste is left from sorghum. I think the secret is going to be getting creative with adjuncts, yeast, etc. From my experimentaton so far I think its going to be easier to capture the spirit of good beers that heavily emphasize hoppy characteristics and spices more than it will be to really capture the malty goodness of something like a mild/brown.

Ymmv, and put some pressure on malters to produce some gluten free speciality grains!
I use maltodextrin as well just because the beer seemed so thin after my first two. Getting creative with adjuncts or specialty grains is where it's at. Forget the large maltsters, they will probably only serve the large companies like AB. I think Bard's does their own for this very reason.

I like to "capture the spirit" I'll formulate a recipe to the style guidelines and use adjuncts accordingly.
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Old 12-16-2009, 06:59 PM   #16
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Yeah I have had concern that breiss is only making sorghum extract for AB. If they ever pull the plug on redbridge I wonder if our source will dry up.

I'll also add that I've been re-reading mosher's radical brewing lately. I think its an excellent reminder of all the creative ingredients that can be used in a beer.

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Old 12-16-2009, 07:01 PM   #17
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I agree, my pumpkin spice ale definitely has mellowed out and the sorghum isn't really there. The tripel sounds interesting though!
Any of my trials and tribulations can be found on the link in my sig.

For ease, here is the link to all the gluten-free recipes I have tried: http://brew.dkershner.com/category/beer/gfbeer/
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Old 12-17-2009, 04:49 AM   #18
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@Soybomb
Fair enough, I concede your point, and can change the chart to say 'at least 2ppm'. And I agree with you that gluten might be something where the problem is in the 'total parts' and not the 'concentration of parts'. Then again, it seems like too few real scientists are working on this sort of problem and we're left to fumble in the dark in the meantime.

Thanks for the feedback. I was trying to make a simple chart that could easily be used. Definitely some details that could be added to make it more in depth. Sometimes to get simplicity you trade the finer details.

Now what we need to do is get a definitive guide for how best to access the sugar contained within our GF grains. Maybe a chart of all the various gelatinization temperatures would be a good start?

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Old 12-17-2009, 02:53 PM   #19
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Now what we need to do is get a definitive guide for how best to access the sugar contained within our GF grains. Maybe a chart of all the various gelatinization temperatures would be a good start?
+100000000000

Everytime I look into sorghum I seem to find a different number. I still haven't done anything with the sorghum I malted...I really need to get on that.
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Old 12-17-2009, 11:19 PM   #20
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Thanks for the input guys, some really good advice. The goal here is to help people make good beer, GF or otherwise.

And I work at Midwest, NB is for jerks.

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