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Old 11-07-2013, 01:53 AM   #11
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I would do some research on the yeast you are using. I think the dry yeast is usually gluten free and the liquid yeast may not be. Safale, saflager, Windsor, Nottingham dry yeasts are gluten free.

I plan on using oats and already purchased some for that purpose but have not got around to including it in a batch. Seems most of the posted recipes that use oats are people trying to achieve a dark beer like a stout. Are you cereal mashing your oats? I think like Buckwheat, if you don't boil it for 10 or so minutes before the regular mash then you just get too much starch in the wart.

For the batch with chestnuts, did you add amylase and pectinase? I followed the instructions on the Chestnut Trails site and my batch turned out tasting petty close to a couple of the Harvester brews. A lot of people really like the chestnut beer taste, but I realized after my batch and tasting Harvester, that I don't. Personal preference. Interested to hear what you think after your test batch.

For your GF Czech Pils, you may want to substitute some sorghum LME for part of the brown rice syrup. I think the rice syrup by itself does not have enough FAN and other stuff for proper fermentation. Then again, in the spirit of testing, go for it and see how it works out. If you find it to be a little thin and lacking, then substitute some LME for rice syrup, maybe 1 lb LME and 0.5 lb rice syrup.

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Old 11-07-2013, 06:55 AM   #12
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The liquid yeast is usually grown on barley malt, meaning that it is a source of gluten contamination. I know somewhere in this subforum someone calculated it out to be about 2ppm in a 5gal Batch. So you can assume that you've probably got some gluten contamination though.

Keep in mind that the FDA has ruled that Foods with less than 20ppm can be labeled "Gluten Free" so technically you are probably gluten free but I would inform your drinkers and let them make the choice.

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Old 11-15-2013, 02:27 AM   #13
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Starting my chestnut beer tonight. I opened up the packages of roasted/shelled chestnuts, found they had a pasty texture and tasted/smelled amazingly like an LME. Crumbled them up into small pieces and just started the mash with a pound of oats at around 165*F with a little over 0.5 tsp amylase. (I haven't looked into cereal mashing at this point. Also, based on what I read in one of the chestnut threads, it seems that the pectinase may not be effective above something like 113*F? I didn't know if that was true or not so I added in a little bit, but I'm planning on adding the main part of it after the boil.) I'm going to do a 12-hour mash (or what I hope is a mash; I'm really riding blind here) keeping it in the oven set to ~150* overnight. Then I strain through a grain bag into the kettle and fill to my boil volume. Sounds about right? Reading the chestnut threads it seems like people were getting all kinds of mash efficiencies.

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Old 11-17-2013, 02:31 AM   #14
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I can see the need for doing a cereal mash using oats now. I ended up getting about 12 gravity points from the chestnuts according to the calculations on Brewtoad (based on the estimated yield from the oats and maltodextrin, more precisely).

I seem to have run into some of the same problems as this brewer: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/gf-...t-beer-251516/. I'm not sure how effective the amylase was over the 12 hour mash and I'm not sure at what temperature but I tried to keep it around 165.

Anyway, I doubt I'll be purchasing chestnuts in this expensive form again, so I'm not sure how valuable this experiment could be since it's not going to be repeated. I probably should have mashed the chestnuts alone, so I could see the results of that apart from the oat starch. But in this spirit, I think Ill go ahead and use BRS as the only fermentable (with maltodextrin) in the Pilsner.

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Old 11-17-2013, 12:41 PM   #15
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My first guess is that the suspended material is due to the oats and not the chestnuts. The chestnut batch I brewed came out clearer than my extract only batches, and that was not because I did a great job. I just steeped with amylase and pectinase as directed by the supplier recipe: http://www.chestnuttrails.com/pages/chestnut-beer
I got no paste at all. The roasted and flaked chestnuts yielded a deep brown clear wart which I boosted with corn sugar and small amount of LME.

I am no expert, but it looks like your mashing temperature is a little high. I think amylase needs the temperature to be in the 145 to 158F and it starts to have trouble over 160F. In the link above, they have their strike water above 160F but the chestnuts bring it down quickly to the mid to low 150's where it needs to be.

The chestnuts are expensive, no doubt. I don't like the taste they give, but others really like it including my wife. I would not abandon them unless you establish that you don't care for them. If you like the flavor, you can always use them in small quantities to add some flavor.

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