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Old 10-06-2010, 02:38 AM   #41
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I use Golden Barrel molasses because it isn't as heavy as the black strap and you run less of a chance of ending up with that heavy molasses taste. Good luck!

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Old 10-06-2010, 03:35 PM   #42
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Well I just normally rack my brews into a secondary. Was recommended to do so in the kits I started with. So when the fermentation slows after about a week I usually rack to secondary and let it go for another two weeks before bottling. Would it hurt to do this with the GF brew?
Hurt? Maybe. Help? Maybe.

Except the hurt is a underattenuation if you transfer a little too early and a taste issue, and the possible contamination of the transfer process, albeit small.

The help is a slightly clearer beer. Although I have been able to achieve incredibly clear beers without a secondary.

I do not secondary unless I am adding real fruit to a beer. Anything else can be done in the primary.
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Old 10-06-2010, 09:03 PM   #43
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I was under the impression that leaving a beer in primary for too long had risks too. So shall I just leave her in the primary a whole month?

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Old 10-06-2010, 09:37 PM   #44
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I was under the impression that leaving a beer in primary for too long had risks too. So shall I just leave her in the primary a whole month?
I've tried it up to 8 months...I have not had any ill effects. That is a holdover from when yeast sucked.

Revvy has a great post on the subject, but I forgot what to search for. Maybe he will show up and give an answer. "Autolysis" is the boogy man you are talking about though.
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Old 10-07-2010, 07:38 PM   #45
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Yea thats what Ive been afraid of getting in my brews. So you think Ill be fine just leaving in primary?

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Old 10-07-2010, 09:21 PM   #46
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I don't have as much experience as others on the forum but I always secondary my beers. I noticed that all my brews have a high level of trub and putting them in a secondary for a week or two gets rid of most of that.

I don't use any finings though so maybe you could do just a primary then add finings going into your bottling bucket.

Like most things with GF brewing its all down to trial and error. Try one way or the other and then let us know how it goes.

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Old 10-07-2010, 09:29 PM   #47
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Yea thats what Ive been afraid of getting in my brews. So you think Ill be fine just leaving in primary?
I have never heard of anyone successfully autolyzing anything with today's yeast. Go for it.
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Old 10-07-2010, 09:32 PM   #48
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I don't have as much experience as others on the forum but I always secondary my beers. I noticed that all my brews have a high level of trub and putting them in a secondary for a week or two gets rid of most of that.

I don't use any finings though so maybe you could do just a primary then add finings going into your bottling bucket.

Like most things with GF brewing its all down to trial and error. Try one way or the other and then let us know how it goes.
It shouldn't affect anything whether you do a 1wk primary and 2wk secondary or just 3wk primary. As long as it has the same amount of time, the same amount of trub will fall out given the same conditions.

The reason that was given to secondary in the first place was to "get it off the yeast" which with today's yeast doesnt make any sense anymore.

But, as long as your beers are fully attenuating and not getting contaminated, you are not hurting them with your additional work.
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Old 10-07-2010, 09:35 PM   #49
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Couldn't find the big post, but here is a pretty good explanation from Revvy on why long primaries are not only fine, but preferred by many around here these days:

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I leave my beers in primary for a month no matter what fermenter I use, and I use both buckets and carboys...

One thing to remember is that Papazian, as wonderful as it is, was written 30 years ago...and a lot of "science" or "common wisdom" that he as an author tapped into has evolved....all authors face this issue with their work.

His basic info is timeless....how to brew beer, figure out recipes, etc...but some of the info is just a reflection of the "opinions," or prevailing wisdom of the times, and may not even reflect his current beliefs...There's a podcast with Papazian from a year or so ago, where he talks about just having started using rice hulls in his mash ton...so if he doesn't update the book again, or write a new one, unless you've heard the podcast or read it on here, you won't KNOW about it.

Here's a good example John Palmer basically admits that what he wrote about IBU's in How to brew, was esentially "wrong" or at least outdated in light of new science...

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March 20, 2008 - What Is an IBU . . . Really?
John Palmer, author of How to Brew, shares information from a conference that challenged his concept of what defines an International Bitterness Unit (IBU).

http://media.libsyn.com/media/basicbrewing/bbr03-20-08ibu.mp3
I cite that podcast as an example of how the knowlegebase shifts so fast in this hobby because of places like this or podcasts...A book is a snapshot of the author's body of knowlege and the "common wisdom" at the time the author wrote the book, which may mean 3 years before it was even published. Papazian's book is 30+ years old. The basic knowlege is good, but brewing science and experience has progressed to where some things an author believes or says at that time may no-longer be valid...even to the author.

I mean I look at my own writings, including my E-book on spirituality, it was written back in 1999-2000, and a lot of my beliefs and ideas have shifted about things in the 8 years...

In that Podcast, Palmer basically contradicts in some was what he wrote in HTB...and I bet it will be reflected in his subsequent writings, but if he doesn't go back and revise HTB, and people don't read or listen to anything by him after, than they won't realize that the knowlegebase has already shifted...

In terms of long primaring, back then, yeah autolysis WAS the big fear at the time of Papazian, someone said this week it may have been a reflection of the oldier and crappier yeasts in the pre-prohibition days.....

Also what is of concern to commercial brewers of light lagers (by the way to lager means to store for a great length of time) or lager brewers in general doesn't necessarily apply to ales...or doesn't apply for a few weeks (or even a couple months of a healthy yeast cake.)

But things, like science, and even the yeasts themselves have changed, and we by our OWN experience have witnessed how much better our beer is when we've left it alone in primary for 2-4 weeks.

By the way a closed, sealed bucket, with an airlock is NOT an open fermentation vessel...an open fermentation would be a bucket without a lid, or a pie tin or towel on it like what was done before homebrewing was legalized in 1978...

Rememeber Papazian was writing his book from right around that time period, when yeasts cake in dry cakes and may not have even been stored properly, and many people just placed towles and cookie sheets on their ceramic crock pot fermenters.

It is podcasts and forums like this where you will find a lot more state of the art, or current views, and even scientific information...I mean if Jamil, John Palmer or Papazian even farts on a podcast, one of us beergeeks are going to start a thread on it within 10 minutes.
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Old 10-07-2010, 11:07 PM   #50
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Thats great info, thanks.

I might start leaving my beers in primary longer and save having to mess about getting it into a secondary. I was under the impression that leaving it on the yeast cake can impart "off" flavours. But that might also be a throw back to ye olde dayes.

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