Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Grain roasting times
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-30-2010, 09:25 PM   #11
DKershner
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bend, OR
Posts: 1,870
Liked 25 Times on 21 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pwarren View Post
Well, I've just had a bit of fun with some buckwheat

started at 180C, going up 10c every half hour, and 1.5 hours and 200C, I know have a solid chunk of charcoal

think my oven temps might be out a little...
Oven temps or not, try starting lower. 105C.
DKershner is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2010, 09:51 PM   #12
Lcasanova
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Lcasanova's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Park Ridge, IL
Posts: 1,043
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ponderingsage View Post
Has any one tried roasting millet wet vs. dry, and noticed a difference in character? John Palmer in his book speaks of roasting grains and notes differences in barley but not any GF grains.
I don't know if it would make a huge difference unless the grains were malted. In that case you would be producing the "cara" or whatever grains since the sugars would carmelize.

I haven't remade any of my recipes yet either so I guess that doesn't help either
__________________
Lucky 13 Brewing Company
Est. 2009
Lcasanova is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2010, 02:18 AM   #13
ponderingsage
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 5
Default

Just roasted today. I went a bit lighter than the photo and stopped at 375. I am going to let them air out for a bit, before brew day. Anyone a good way to crush but not pulverize the millet. I don't have a grain mill, so I am thinking about using a rolling pin, with the goal of just cracking the grains.

__________________
ponderingsage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2010, 02:21 AM   #14
Lcasanova
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Lcasanova's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Park Ridge, IL
Posts: 1,043
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I put mine in a gallon ziplock bag and use a rolling pin. I think its a good idea to let the grains waft for a week or two before using them in a brew.

__________________
Lucky 13 Brewing Company
Est. 2009
Lcasanova is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-05-2010, 04:04 PM   #15
ponderingsage
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 5
Default

I am wondering at what temperatures and how long to steep the millet. I was thinking around 160 F for 30 min. Also, I roasted two pounds, one pound was lighter and the other darker. For a 5 gal batch would you steep all of the two lbs. or can I use one lb. and save the other for a different batch.
Thanks.

__________________
ponderingsage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2010, 06:44 AM   #16
Soybomb
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 65
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ponderingsage View Post
Has any one tried roasting millet wet vs. dry, and noticed a difference in character? John Palmer in his book speaks of roasting grains and notes differences in barley but not any GF grains.
I haven't done any comparisons for character (and I don't think there would be much without the effect of an amylase containing grain), however, I decided to try a side by side comparison of soaked and unsoaked grains for toasting.

The closest thing I had locally available is bob's red mill mighty tasty gluten free cereal (contains brown rice, corn, white sorghum, buckwheat). I poured half the bag in a bowl filled with water and let it soak for 30-45 minutes, and then poured the two halves on a cookies sheet. I started it at 225 and increased the oven temp 25 degrees every 30 minutes or so. I make it to about the 4 hour mark before I had enough of the smoke and pulled the pan from the oven. Talk about a difference in color.


I repeated the test with a bag of old creamy buckwheat cereal (from when it was gluten free) and the results were equally clear. The soaked grains can be toasted to a much much darker color than the dry ones.

Now obviously my hands were somewhat tied with having only pretty finely crushed cereal available and they both probably need to be toasted separately to be sure one grain isn't the one doing too much smoking. I sure plan to research it more though. My initial guess is that the unsoaked grains might be better for flavoring additions and the soaked grains will be great for color.

I just made a porter that seems to have about the right color. I steeped 4 oz soaked and toasted creamy buckwheat, 6oz soaked and toasted mighty tasty gf cereal, 4 oz unsoaked mighty tasty, 2 oz unsoaked buckwheat, 4 oz gf rolled oats, .5# d2 syrup, and boiled a small soup pan of wort down til the bubbles started stacking on a separate burner during the main boil. I can't speak to the taste yet but colorwise I think I might have hit porter.
__________________
Check out my site, BrewHeads.com for free brewing calculators and tools
Soybomb is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2010, 05:29 PM   #17
Lcasanova
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Lcasanova's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Park Ridge, IL
Posts: 1,043
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ponderingsage View Post
I am wondering at what temperatures and how long to steep the millet. I was thinking around 160 F for 30 min. Also, I roasted two pounds, one pound was lighter and the other darker. For a 5 gal batch would you steep all of the two lbs. or can I use one lb. and save the other for a different batch.
Thanks.
Sorry for the delay- I steep mine at 160 for 30 minutes. Once I hit about 165 I add the grains and turn the heat off and cover it. The loss is minimal and I don't think it hurts if the temp goes too low. You could steep all 2lbs or use only one and save it for later- entirely up to you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soybomb View Post
I haven't done any comparisons for character (and I don't think there would be much without the effect of an amylase containing grain), however, I decided to try a side by side comparison of soaked and unsoaked grains for toasting.

Talk about a difference in color.
Nice comparison, glad to see someone did this- next time I plan to make a darker beer I will definetly do this!
__________________
Lucky 13 Brewing Company
Est. 2009
Lcasanova is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2010, 06:55 PM   #18
aggieotis
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 168
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

Great work there!

__________________
aggieotis is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2010, 06:08 PM   #19
anemic
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 120
Default

GF Brewers,

What will "Toasted Oats" do for a brew?

I guess my question cuts to the purpose of steeping grains. Seems to me they mainly impart color. Secondary to this, you get a small bit of fermentable sugars and you get some small flavor nuance. Is that the grist or it, I mean the gist of it?

__________________
anemic is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2010, 08:27 PM   #20
midfielder5
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 1,364
Liked 50 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ponderingsage View Post
Just roasted today. I went a bit lighter than the photo and stopped at 375. I am going to let them air out for a bit, before brew day. Anyone a good way to crush but not pulverize the millet. I don't have a grain mill, so I am thinking about using a rolling pin, with the goal of just cracking the grains.
the millet (and other small grains like quinoa & amarath) are tiny and fell through my grain mill at the closest setting. they also got through my strainer and into the boil pot, so I don't use them any more.

As others have mentioned-- it is also a good idea to let the toasted grains sit for at least a week in a paper bag (or longer if possible), so the burnt odors waft out. I read that professional malt makers hold on to theirs for 6 months.
__________________
midfielder5 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Roasting your own grain. Orfy All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 11 02-05-2011 02:38 PM
grain roasting? volstag All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 10-21-2009 03:47 PM
Hard times cheapest most practical grain crusher/mill? Beau815 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 39 06-04-2009 02:42 AM
chart for grain mash temps and times todd_k All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 10-02-2006 04:03 PM
Reason for different boil times, all grain vs. extract? Thor General Techniques 5 12-18-2005 08:26 PM