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-   -   Grain roasting times (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/grain-roasting-times-144842/)

Androshen 11-03-2009 02:34 AM

Grain roasting times
 
I had seen this info but could not find it again ....
If I am going for a rich medium amber color, what should the roasting temps/times be for the following unmalted grains:
buckwheat, quinoa and millet?

Lcasanova 11-03-2009 04:23 AM

Put them on a pan and into the oven at 225-F, after 30 minutes increase temp 25 degrees, etc. Stop when you get the color you want.

I just did this with some millet, here's what I got:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/gallery/...Millet_001.JPG

I only got the temp up to 425 before I could stand it any longer- it will smell pretty bad the higher the temp gets. My grains started smoking around 325 FYI.

Good luck, I'm going to get some wild rice and roast that next.

KYB 11-03-2009 04:51 AM

What he said. My house smelled like ass for a day or 2. I pretty much did the same, going up to 400.

Androshen 11-03-2009 11:00 AM

Should I stir or shake them occasionally?

400d 11-03-2009 01:41 PM

I have a question on this:

Is it possible to toast already malted grains, and what is the difference between toasted malted and toasted unmalted grains when it comes to brewing?

Lcasanova 11-03-2009 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Androshen (Post 1651690)
Should I stir or shake them occasionally?

I took the tray out and shook them occasionally.

Lcasanova 11-03-2009 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 400d (Post 1651915)
I have a question on this:

Is it possible to toast already malted grains, and what is the difference between toasted malted and toasted unmalted grains when it comes to brewing?

It's possible to toast malted grains but I don't know that I would exactly toast them to a high degree if I took the time to malt them. Now I don't know the exact answer but I think the more you toast malted grains, the less fermentable sugar that is eventually available. That said, in order to get "crystal" the grains must be malted and then kilned/roasted wet to carmelize the sugars.

I'd say the main difference between the two is the potential additional sugar you would be adding (if using the grains as specialty grains).

Hope that gives you some ideas, search around for roasting malted grains to find some more info on here, but I'm sure someone will chime in with some better answers.

Laughing_Gnome_Invisible 11-03-2009 01:55 PM

I have nothing to offer on unmalted grains. I would just like to point out to those that may not know already that an oven thermometer on the grain bed is an essential! Never, ever trust what your oven tells you it is doing. Your grain can be up to 100F cooler than your oven tells you.

pwarren 01-29-2010 07:08 AM

Well, I've just had a bit of fun with some buckwheat :)

started at 180C, going up 10c every half hour, and 1.5 hours and 200C, I know have a solid chunk of charcoal :(

think my oven temps might be out a little...

ponderingsage 01-30-2010 08:57 PM

Has any one tried roasting millet wet vs. dry, and noticed a difference in character? John Palmer in his book speaks of roasting grains and notes differences in barley but not any GF grains.


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