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-   -   Gluten Free (and stout) question (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/gluten-free-stout-question-204375/)

andrewdell19 11-05-2010 01:30 AM

Gluten Free (and stout) question
 
So this is my second attempt at a GF Stout. First one turned out just ok but it was very thick- in fact my first 3 GF beers were thick in body and poor clarity and tasted a little yeasty. I have since used gelatin (2nd ferm) in my recent batches and that has really cleared up the problem. My most recent citrus IPA is pretty bomb digity:rockin: Maybe I was not letting the beer settle long enough to get all the suspended proteins and yeast out?

My stout is in the 2nd ferm (10 days in primary) and will remain there until 3 days before Thanksgiving when I will force carb (I also plan on saving about 12-18 bottles to age the beer and see how it tastes 3, 6, and hopefully but doubtful 12 months).

My question is what will putting a clearing agent (gelatin) into the stout do? Will it take some of the color (dont want that) and most of the body out of the beer? The color is choc brown right now (for some reason I cant get a black stout using the sorghum malt). Of course you dont want a stout being light in taste but I dont want the overly thick almost yeasty taste...

thanks for the suggestions!!

fermentedhiker 11-05-2010 02:11 AM

it might be helpful if you detail your recipe and process. It might give people a better idea what's going on with your brew, or at least give us some ideas of what to try on our own batches :)

Lcasanova 11-05-2010 02:15 AM

Did you try cold crashing it?

Lcasanova 11-05-2010 02:17 AM

I've just roasted some buckwheat and millet as dark as I dared to go that I will be using in both my american brown ale and my double chocolate oatmeal stout. I doubt I'll get black but I should get some decent color from them.

andrewdell19 11-05-2010 03:56 AM

Well I guess I cold crash when kegging it. But really I should probably cold crash before I keg the beer so the sediment settles before putting it in a keg. How long after going into the 2nd ferm do you cold crash? When it stops fermenting?

andrewdell19 11-05-2010 03:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fermentedhiker (Post 2384711)
it might be helpful if you detail your recipe and process. It might give people a better idea what's going on with your brew, or at least give us some ideas of what to try on our own batches :)

sure I will get it on the forum sometime tomorrow. I tasted it going into the 2nd ferm and it tasted pretty dang good. Not very bitter at all and I hear that can happen when using coffee and cocoa powder.

Lcasanova 11-05-2010 04:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrewdell19 (Post 2384968)
Well I guess I cold crash when kegging it. But really I should probably cold crash before I keg the beer so the sediment settles before putting it in a keg. How long after going into the 2nd ferm do you cold crash? When it stops fermenting?

I've gotten away from doing a secondary lately but IF I were still doing it and I was going to cold crash...probably 5 days before bottling is when I would cold crash it. I don't know if there is a written rule or a "this works better than that" thing going on.

DKershner 11-05-2010 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lcasanova (Post 2385012)
I don't know if there is a written rule or a "this works better than that" thing going on.

Rule: Longer is clearer. After a week or so, hard to notice a difference in most beers though.

Keep in mind that anything besides Clarex or other extreme measures isn't going to change the mouthfeel much though, it is pretty much strictly for appearance. If you are getting a chunky beer, chances are good it is the recipe, not insufficient clarity.

For example, my hefeweizens (real, not GF) are very cloudy, but are also very light and crisp in mouthfeel.

andrewdell19 11-05-2010 04:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DKershner (Post 2385720)
Rule: Longer is clearer. After a week or so, hard to notice a difference in most beers though.

Keep in mind that anything besides Clarex or other extreme measures isn't going to change the mouthfeel much though, it is pretty much strictly for appearance. If you are getting a chunky beer, chances are good it is the recipe, not insufficient clarity.

For example, my hefeweizens (real, not GF) are very cloudy, but are also very light and crisp in mouthfeel.

Ok well it definately isnt chunky. I might not be explaining it too well. I think I will try the cold crashing and at a last resort the gelatin.

What in the recipe would cause the beer to be chunky? Too many brewing/spec grains? I guess shaking the primary or secondary ferm when transfering the beer would cause it be thicker.

andrewdell19 11-05-2010 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lcasanova (Post 2385012)
I've gotten away from doing a secondary lately but IF I were still doing it and I was going to cold crash...probably 5 days before bottling is when I would cold crash it. I don't know if there is a written rule or a "this works better than that" thing going on.

So you just rack into a glass carboy after the boil? How much sediment is at the bottom before you bottle? For instance this stout I just did had almost a gallon of sediment at the bottom (cocoa powder and roasted gf oatmeal was probably the reason)


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