Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Gluten Free Brewing Observations
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-29-2008, 08:07 PM   #21
yeastybeasty
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 14
Default

All dry yeasts *should* be fine - Fermentis and Lallemand/Danstar are anyway (as far as I know.) Wyeast put out a couple of seasonal GF strains a while ago but I don't know whether they're still available. White Labs claims that their yeast is "low in gluten" and within the European gluten-free standard but I hesitate to use it. My best GF ales have been made with Windsor/ Nottingham yeasts.

__________________
"If a beer is to have character, it must be because the brewer deliberately gives it one."
Michael Jackson, The New World Guide to Beer

yeastybeasty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2008, 03:54 PM   #22
FatMonsters
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: NY
Posts: 580
Default

Good points about the yeast. I used the Nottingham dry.

I'm not sure if I would call it a 'beery' taste. Its different and like I said its got a slight cidery flavor when I went to bottle it. I hope that mellows. Otherwise, its a very light (color, body, flavor) beer. But I gave it a shot for my friend. Hopefully it'll turn okay and she won't want to just dump it!?

Oh I'd love to do an all-grain gluten-free brew. Maybe next year...

__________________
FatMonsters is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-19-2008, 11:38 AM   #23
FatMonsters
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: NY
Posts: 580
Default

Update:

Cracked one open last night to test carbonation, my friend's birthday is this weekend, giving the beer as a gift. I know she'll appreciate the thought of the gift. Hope she likes it.

Summary: Not bad, but not great either. Very light color with nice clarity. Pours very light head which dissipated quickly to a small lacing in the glass. Taste is very light on malt and hops (wasn't shooting for a hopbomb anyway). Slight cidery flavor detected at bottling has dissipated, can't really taste that anymore. Overall, just a really light beer. It would good on hot days, which is now! I would definitely like to explore doing another gluten free brew, but next time with some grains to get more flavor.

Not my worst beer and certainly not my best, but quaffable...

__________________
FatMonsters is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-19-2008, 12:02 PM   #24
menschmaschine
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Delaware
Posts: 3,278
Liked 31 Times on 26 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yeastybeasty View Post
White Labs claims that their yeast is "low in gluten" and within the European gluten-free standard but I hesitate to use it.
That sounds strange to me. My impression is that the EU is pretty strict on labeling something as "Gluten Free". Celiac disease is either more prevalent or more recognized in the UK, for example. There, a celiac can get "prescription food" from the NHS (basically free gluten-free food). It's almost strange... you literally go to a pharmacy like Boots (similar to Walgreens) and pick up a box of prescription food every week or two (bread, tea biscuits, pasta, etc.). If White Labs yeast truly meets EU Gluten Free standards, I wouldn't hesitate to use it.
__________________
menschmaschine is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-19-2008, 12:19 PM   #25
paulvp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Blaine, MN
Posts: 57
Default

I've been wanting to try this as my stepmother and stepsister both have celiac disease. Thanks for the nice write up.

__________________

Primary: Winter Ale
Primary 2: Oatmeal Stout
Secondary: Empty
Secondary 2: Nut Brown Ale
Conditioning: Rogue Dead Guy Clone
Drinking: EdWort's Apfelwein (2)
Gone: IPA, Belgian Witbier, Scottish Ale
On Deck: Cream Ale
In Freezer: Centennial, Liberty


Vermillion Street Brewing
paulvp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-19-2008, 01:14 PM   #26
FatMonsters
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: NY
Posts: 580
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by paulvp View Post
Thanks for the nice write up.
No problem. Definitely give it a try and play with the hops and/or fruit to your liking, or your stepsister and stepmohter's liking.
__________________
FatMonsters is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-20-2008, 12:42 AM   #27
yeastybeasty
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 14
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by menschmaschine View Post
That sounds strange to me. My impression is that the EU is pretty strict on labeling something as "Gluten Free"
Yeah, you're right - the EU standard is 20ppm, which is a pretty damn small amount of gluten. I guess it's just the fact that there may be *some* gluten that sort of concerns me. I've got a real hankering for a GF bitter made with the Fullers strain, so I may give White Labs a try...
__________________
"If a beer is to have character, it must be because the brewer deliberately gives it one."
Michael Jackson, The New World Guide to Beer

yeastybeasty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2008, 01:29 AM   #28
bootin-gluten
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 18
Default Need some instruction for a newbie :)

Hi,
I used to brew from can (yeah, I know you're probably looking down on me right now) but I've stopped drinking beer since I am no longer able to tolerate gluten (a real pain). I have been looking into making my own gluten-free beer and realized that there aren't any GF canned wort kits out there. I haven't really used made a beer using hops etc. before so I was wondering if you would mind giving me a more detailed explanation of how it's done. This is what I'm guessing:

1. Boil 5 gallons of water
1. add the sorghum syrup and succanat to the boiling water
2. (attempting to discern hops schedule... are the times you list there the number of minutes before turning off the burner or number of minutes to have them in the boiling wort?) From what I'm guessing, it's the latter... but please let me know if this is right or not.
3. After boil time, shut off heat and then add honey
4. Put wort pot in a cold bath to facilitate cooling
5. While wort is cooling, add dried yeast to a cup of warm water to rehydrate it
6. Once wort is cooled to the proper temperature (~16-20 degrees celsius for that yeast?), add yeast to wort.
7. Did you use 1 or 2-stage fermentation
8. I think I can get the rest.

By the way, I think I might try malting some buckwheat, sorghum or quinoa as per one of the suggestions. Just curious how this is added as I've never used real grains before.

Thanks so much for starting this thread!

__________________
bootin-gluten is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-16-2012, 06:56 PM   #29
fergy89406
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Fallon, NV
Posts: 34
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

There are many things you can add to your gluten-free brews to give them a little more flavor capacity. Flaked oats can be thrown in for body and creaminess, and the use of honey and belgian candi syrups can add flavor and color!

__________________
"There can't be good living where there is not good drinking." ~ Ben Franklin
fergy89406 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-19-2012, 05:05 AM   #30
kevlee67
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Englevale, North Dakota
Posts: 13
Default

Hello folks
I went gluten free recently, and well my only choice is redbridge.
I have since, ordered a brew kits, with a few extra carboys. I now have 3 batches in the carboys, saving my last for my son who is coming this next weekend as he wants to see how its brewed.
I made 2 with sorghum and I also made a kit batch with "clarity ferm" oh brewed it one nite and itched like hell the next day. But its in the carboy. I am deciding if I will go thru the advanced stage and let it ferment for 4 weeks or bottle it after 2.
I know nothing about brewing my own beer, but I sure like to experiment. I added maple syrup to one and nector, etc............I will post the reciepes, along with my opinion on each when I drink them. What I really want to do, is make a beer close to redbridge as I can drink that beer. I dont like the bitter, I dont like bitter at all. I found what hops redbridge uses, and some of the ingrediants, dont know about the yeast, but I gave it a good shot, only thing I added that redbridge dont show up as ingrediants is honey.
I will try a few more. But if anyone has suggestions, I would like to hear them. So who is the beer expert? Drink a redbridge and talk to me.

Kevin

__________________
kevlee67 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Amylase enzyme and gluten free brewing kontreren Gluten Free Brewing 11 03-05-2012 07:57 PM
gluten free mcody2005 Gluten Free Brewing 15 09-18-2010 01:26 AM
Gluten Free Brewing- DPP-IV enzymes? casebrew Gluten Free Brewing 9 10-17-2009 12:06 AM
Gluten Free Brewing Forum kontreren HomeBrewTalk Announcements & Feedback 11 09-23-2009 04:18 PM
gluten free brewing. colivari Gluten Free Brewing 7 07-07-2009 10:48 PM