Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Gluten Free Beer Ingredient List
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-09-2010, 07:00 PM   #1
DKershner
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bend, OR
Posts: 1,870
Liked 25 Times on 21 Posts

Default Gluten Free Beer Ingredient List

"Malt" and Adjuncts:
  • Sorghum, both in raw form, Syrup Extract, and Syrup itself. The syrup extract is the closest thing to barley in terms of FAN, enzymes, and sugar content, but imparts a tangy, bitter, or citrusy aftertaste. This is the most highly used ingredient in gluten free beer. The syrup itself has unknown properties at this time for brewing. Raw form is also fairly unknown. Note: The roots of raw sorghum can contain cyanide and must be removed.
  • Brown Rice Syrup and Solids. Imparts a slight sweetness in taste to the brew, but ferments out similarly to sorghum or malt extract. Little FAN, may have problems converting on it's own.
  • Buckwheat, raw. Imparts a slight wheat-like flavor that can change with how long it is roasted. Often used for color. No enzymes.
  • Chestnut chips. Closest to barley flavor of the gluten free grains. No enzymes, so they must be added, typically amylase is used.
  • Corn Sugar, table sugar, candi sugar, corn syrup, etc. All impart their own colors and flavors and can be used as in gluten beer.
  • Maltodextrin. MOST of the time this ingredient is gluten free, especially in the US, check with your provider to be sure. Used for additional body in the beer.
  • Rice. Minute Rice is suggested to be used due to its ability to convert itself.
  • Oats. Make sure you get ones designated as 'gluten free' or else they could be crop rotated with wheat or packaged using equipment that also does wheat containing products. Used for mouthfeel, body, and head retention.
  • "Light" molasses= 90% fermentable
  • Blackstrap molasses = 50% fermentable
Approximate equivalent gluten free grain by common beer grain as matched by nutritional information*:
Wheat ~ Millet, Teff
Barley ~ Sorghum, Chestnuts
Rye ~ Buckwheat
Oats ~ GF Oats (duh), Quinoa, Amaranth

Hops:
All hops are gluten free.

Yeast:

Yeasts that are completely gluten free:
  • All Fermentis Safale and Saflager Dry Yeasts - US05, S04, S33, T58, WB06, etc.
  • All Danstar/Lallemand/DCL Labs Dry Yeast Products - Nottingham, Windsor, etc.
  • Red Star Wine and Champagne Yeast - Montrachet, Pasteur, etc.

Yeasts that are almost gluten free:
  • White Labs Yeast - All including Wine and Mead Yeast
  • This Yeast contains 12ppm in the slurry, a number slightly above the less than 10ppm requirement to be called gluten free. However, the final product (5gal of beer) only has 2ppm.

Yeasts that are not gluten free:
  • Any Wyeast Yeast, including Wine and Mead Yeast

For strategies on how to reduce or eliminate gluten from yeast, see this link.

Any additions or suggestions, let me know.

Links to other helpful stuff:
* Source: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/gf-...alents-168609/

DKershner is offline
5
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-09-2010, 07:35 PM   #2
uechikid
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
uechikid's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Antioch Ca.
Posts: 625
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Should Be Made A Sticky

Nice list. Thanks

__________________

"Carpe Diem"

uechikid is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-09-2010, 08:17 PM   #3
dorklord
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Wisconsin
Posts: 578
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Awesome, although perhaps under the sorghum we should break down the syrup, as there are 2 types: the sorghum liquid extract you can buy from say your HB supply, (from what I understand this is generally from Breiss) and the sorghum syrup you can buy at the grocery store/farmers' market/Amish buggy.

Sorghum liquid extract is made from sorghum grain, and looks and acts a lot like LME.

Sorghum syrup (aka sorghum molasses) from your Amish friend is made by boiling down the juice from crushed stalks, and looks and tastes much more like molasses. I don't know for sure how differently this would react in brewing (I do have half a gallon of the stuff, though, so I'll find out eventually).

__________________

That's bread yeast. Look at it sitting there, all depressed. Listless. Beer yeast doesn't look like that. It has hopes. Dreams. Something to look forward to...

dorklord is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-09-2010, 08:21 PM   #4
DKershner
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bend, OR
Posts: 1,870
Liked 25 Times on 21 Posts

Default

I was under the impression they were one in the same...I wonder what Briess adds that changes the flavor...

DKershner is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-09-2010, 08:49 PM   #5
dorklord
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Wisconsin
Posts: 578
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I don't think it is that they add anything. I think the difference is that they getting an extract from the grain (seeds), while sorghum syrup is made from the sap.

__________________

That's bread yeast. Look at it sitting there, all depressed. Listless. Beer yeast doesn't look like that. It has hopes. Dreams. Something to look forward to...

dorklord is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-09-2010, 09:11 PM   #6
DKershner
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bend, OR
Posts: 1,870
Liked 25 Times on 21 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dorklord View Post
I don't think it is that they add anything. I think the difference is that they getting an extract from the grain (seeds), while sorghum syrup is made from the sap.
Makes some sense I guess. Briess:

Quote:
Enzymatically produced from the starchy heads of the grain, not the cane, of the sorghum plant, BriesSweet™ White Sorghum Syrup
__________________
DKershner is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-09-2010, 10:14 PM   #7
dorklord
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Wisconsin
Posts: 578
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dkershner View Post
Makes some sense I guess. Briess:
I saw somewhere on their site that they don't malt the sorghum (and I've read a few articles about malting it, and it sounds like a PIA because the grains are so dang small). So if they are extracting enzymatically, that means they're doing a mash with amylase...

If I get around to trying all grain, I might just give that a shot. Of course, it may be that malting it first is worth it, as it may be that some of the flavors we're getting in sorghum extract are the result of extracting from 'green', unmalted, presumably un-kilned and unroasted, grain?

I'm getting to far out on a theoretical limb here. I'd say I need a beer, but I'm someplace I can't have a beer.
__________________

That's bread yeast. Look at it sitting there, all depressed. Listless. Beer yeast doesn't look like that. It has hopes. Dreams. Something to look forward to...

dorklord is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-10-2010, 03:16 AM   #8
BBBF
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,127
Liked 54 Times on 44 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default

Briess isn't from malted grain. They get it the same way as he "other" syrup, but you don't want to brew with that. I know from experience.

__________________
BBBF is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-10-2010, 04:00 AM   #9
Lcasanova
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Lcasanova's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Park Ridge, IL
Posts: 1,043
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dorklord View Post
I saw somewhere on their site that they don't malt the sorghum (and I've read a few articles about malting it, and it sounds like a PIA because the grains are so dang small). So if they are extracting enzymatically, that means they're doing a mash with amylase...

If I get around to trying all grain, I might just give that a shot. Of course, it may be that malting it first is worth it, as it may be that some of the flavors we're getting in sorghum extract are the result of extracting from 'green', unmalted, presumably un-kilned and unroasted, grain?

I'm getting to far out on a theoretical limb here. I'd say I need a beer, but I'm someplace I can't have a beer.
Home malting is a PITA but, I did some sorghum here

And as far as I know, they aren't extracting the syrup we are getting from the grains, but from the stalks themselves
__________________
Lucky 13 Brewing Company
Est. 2009
Lcasanova is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-10-2010, 04:39 AM   #10
dorklord
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Wisconsin
Posts: 578
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcasanova View Post
Home malting is a PITA but, I did some sorghum here

And as far as I know, they aren't extracting the syrup we are getting from the grains, but from the stalks themselves
Quote:
Briess isn't from malted grain. They get it the same way as he "other" syrup, but you don't want to brew with that. I know from experience.
BriesSweet™ White Sorghum Syrup 45DE High Maltose is a gluten free, 100% concentrated wort made from the unmalted grain, not the cane, of the white sorghum plant.
From here

While the sorghum syrup you can get at a grocery store:
Sorghum syrup made from cane sorghum is made by squeezing the juice from the cane and cooking off the excess water to obtain a sweet, sticky syrup - a delicacy in many parts of the country.

So, according to Briess, they get their stuff from the unmalted grain, not the 'cane' (stalk).

I'm not sure what the difference is, exactly, but if you pour some of each out, you can tell they aren't the same.
__________________

That's bread yeast. Look at it sitting there, all depressed. Listless. Beer yeast doesn't look like that. It has hopes. Dreams. Something to look forward to...

dorklord is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Tags
please make this a sticky

Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gluten Free Beer kontreren Introductions 2 08-25-2008 03:55 PM
Gluten-Free Beer Llama Recipes/Ingredients 6 04-21-2008 08:47 AM
Gluten Free beer srm775 Recipes/Ingredients 3 01-09-2008 02:09 AM
Gluten-Free Beer pilkinga General Beer Discussion 4 12-27-2005 05:27 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS