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-   -   Gluten Free Beer from Dogfish Head (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/gluten-free-beer-dogfish-head-288625/)

kyleslattery 12-21-2011 05:09 PM

Gluten Free Beer from Dogfish Head
 
I'm not allergic to gluten, but I know a bunch of people who are, and they'll be pretty psyched about this: You asked for it ... | Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales

I've tried a few commercial GF beers and have been pretty disappointed, hopefully DFH gets it right!

Quote:

"It seems as if lots of folks who have gluten- tolerance issues are pining for an interesting beer," says Dogfish founder and president Sam Calagione. "While there are a few well-made examples that mirror traditional beer styles, there arent any off-centered offerings."

Enter Dogfish's fruit-forward Tweasonale.

For our first new 12-ounce 4-packs in nearly half a decade, we replaced the classic barley foundation of beer with a mild sorghum base. The hints of molasses and pit-fruit are balanced by vibrant strawberry notes and a unique complexity that comes with the addition of a malty buckwheat honey.

We believe health-conscious beer drinkers and the millions of Americans who suffer from Celiac disease can cut back on gluten while relishing the distinction and drinkability of this very special brew.

Tweasonale is a seasonal for between the seasons. It will first hit shelves in late January 2012 and will be released four times a year through our national network of distributors.


PassionForThePint 12-21-2011 06:10 PM

I'm looking forward to this one. I don't have an aversion to gluten, but I have some friends that do. I'm looking forward to sharing this one with them

KevinM 12-21-2011 06:16 PM

I'd wonder about the bottling process however. Dedicated gluten free line?

kyleslattery 12-21-2011 06:20 PM

Looks like it's GFCO.org certified, so there shouldn't be any cross-contamination issues: https://twitter.com/#!/dogfishbeer/status/149537384000786433

KevinM 12-21-2011 07:32 PM

Not quite the same thing. A dedicated line means no chance of cross contamination. GFCO just means that the end product meets the below 10-20ppm threshold. Unfortunately, people still may have reactions. I'd assume that they're not on a dedicated line since they didn't say so. Oh well.

spaced 12-21-2011 07:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinM (Post 3590986)
Not quite the same thing. A dedicated line means no chance of cross contamination. GFCO just means that the end product meets the below 10-20ppm threshold. Unfortunately, people still may have reactions. I'd assume that they're not on a dedicated line since they didn't say so. Oh well.

Yeah they'd be way too small a company to have a dedicated line. I'm happy to give it a try if it makes it down to Australia.

Funny how much the gluten free landscape has changed in just twelve months. I remember a year ago watching their discovery show, then looking at their website and seeing them saying "we have no plans to brew a gluten free beer".

kyleslattery 12-22-2011 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinM (Post 3590986)
Not quite the same thing. A dedicated line means no chance of cross contamination. GFCO just means that the end product meets the below 10-20ppm threshold. Unfortunately, people still may have reactions. I'd assume that they're not on a dedicated line since they didn't say so. Oh well.

Ah, thanks for the correction—I misunderstood the certification.

Weizenwerks 12-22-2011 01:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinM (Post 3590986)
Not quite the same thing. A dedicated line means no chance of cross contamination. GFCO just means that the end product meets the below 10-20ppm threshold. Unfortunately, people still may have reactions. I'd assume that they're not on a dedicated line since they didn't say so. Oh well.

The Brewing Network had a gluten free show two weeks ago with Sam on the phone talking about it. It was a great show and I highly recommend listening to it.

DougmanXL 12-22-2011 07:16 PM

They probably clean the line before doing a run of gluten free beer... but sounds like they are going to put a lot of thought into the flavor, it may be the best GF sorghum beers ever - way to go DFH!

PS: I just tried making a beer where I replaced half the sorghum with honey, I didnt add strawberry juice, or whatever else they added. I have a feeling it will end up tasting slightly like mead, instead of tasting sorghum-ish. Then again I love mead... I wonder if you need to ferment/store it for longer, like a mead?

dorklord 12-25-2011 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DougmanXL (Post 3594065)
They probably clean the line before doing a run of gluten free beer... but sounds like they are going to put a lot of thought into the flavor, it may be the best GF sorghum beers ever - way to go DFH!

PS: I just tried making a beer where I replaced half the sorghum with honey, I didnt add strawberry juice, or whatever else they added. I have a feeling it will end up tasting slightly like mead, instead of tasting sorghum-ish. Then again I love mead... I wonder if you need to ferment/store it for longer, like a mead?

I'm sure that depends on the sorghum to honey ratio, and the final alcohol content. I've found that my sorghum beers tend to take a little longer to start tasting good, even if the gravity has dropped, than similar barley beers.

But I've read that the mix of nutrients and sugar profiles in malt (and malt-like substances) tend to support the much more rapid fermentation of beer (as opposed to the much slower fermentations of mead, wine, and even cider) with even something like a half-and-half malt to honey ratio.


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