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Old 05-23-2012, 08:08 PM   #1
frothdaddy
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Default GF IPA Partial Boil Recipe?

I've been doing some digging around in this GF forum and there is some awesome info in here.

One thing I haven't found is a partial boil GF IPA recipe. I'm a fairly new home brewer, and don't have a big setup yet, so I'm stuck with partial boils for now.

Any suggestions? I like the look of igliashon's Grapefruit IPA, but was unsure of how to go about scaling that up to 5 gallons while keeping a partial boil.

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Old 05-23-2012, 09:22 PM   #2
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Why not just do a 3-gallon batch instead? My reasoning for doing 3-gallon batches is this: I don't know what I'm doing, so there's a good chance my experiments will fail, so smaller = less waste. I've already produced three abject failures--2 gruits and a messed-up brain-dead attempt at an IIPA. That's 9 gallons of waste vs. 15! Also, full boils are better. I did partial boils for my first couple beers, and while the results were "okay" (after several months of aging!), switching to full-boils made for beer that was great right out of the fermentor. I simply *cannot* over-state the importance of doing full boils! Lastly, 3 gallon carboys are cheaper and smaller, so you can experiment more easily and more frequently. I can assure you, you are going to be experimenting A LOT. It's cheaper, and easier to get through 3 gallons of mediocre beer than it is 5 gallons. Bottling goes quicker, and you need less space to store the bottles. Also, you can feasibly brew more often this way, so you can try out more recipes and more ideas, and your turn-around time from when you get amazing new epiphanies to when you can actually apply in brewing will be shorter. You'll also end up with a larger variety of beers on hand to drink, so you don't get sick of each batch. Right now I've got my pick of 8 or 9 different batches of my own homebrew to drink. Some of those batches are crap, but having the variety available lets me pick away at them instead of trying to slog through as fast as possible so there's room to make the next batch.

If you absolutely MUST do a partial boil, take the recipes you like from here, go to hopville.com and use Beer Calculus to scale the recipes--match the original recipe's gravity and IBUs and you should be fine. The Beer Calculus app will automatically compensate for your reduced hop utilization from the smaller (and more concentrated) boils. It's a great little app and makes tweaking recipes a lot more fool-proof.

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Old 05-23-2012, 09:22 PM   #3
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@OP

Yeah I boil about 3 gallons of water with the sorghum and hops. Cold crash. And then top up with clean water (I use cheap bottled water).

You will lose some bitterness doing it this way but just put a couple of extra grams of hops in.

In Big W (our version of walmart) they sell 5 gallon pots for $20, which I'm still able to heat up half full with my ****ty stove.

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Old 05-24-2012, 06:48 AM   #4
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I just bottled my first gluten free beer, it was an IPA, and I did a partial boil. The recipe is here: http://hopville.com/recipe/1333155/a...luten-free-ipa

In fact, it being my first boil/cold crash, I struggled a little with cooling, which took about an hour. I also pre-boiled the top-up water, which John Palmer had insisted in How to Brew would cool in time.

So everything was a little hot (about 28 celsius) when I pitched, but it seemed OK come bottling time. So far, so good. I'll know in 2 weeks how it came out.

Oh, and +1 to Beer Calculus. I found it really useful.

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Old 05-24-2012, 12:18 PM   #5
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Thanks for the input. It sounds like I'm better off upgrading my equipment and going with full boils. I didn't realize partial vs. full boil was that different in terms of beer quality.

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Old 05-24-2012, 06:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frothdaddy View Post
Thanks for the input. It sounds like I'm better off upgrading my equipment and going with full boils. I didn't realize partial vs. full boil was that different in terms of beer quality.
I think it is the single-most understated aspect of homebrewing.
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Old 05-25-2012, 12:43 AM   #7
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I'm curious (and confused) what would cause you to not be able to do a full boil? Just not having a big enough pot?

You only need to boil 2 gallons or so right? Or is that what you mean by a partial boil?

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Old 05-25-2012, 12:53 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thanantos View Post
I'm curious (and confused) what would cause you to not be able to do a full boil? Just not having a big enough pot?

You only need to boil 2 gallons or so right? Or is that what you mean by a partial boil?
That's what I mean by a partial boil. My pot is too small (it's 5 gallons exactly), and I've been doing my boils on an old electric stove, so there's barely enough power to get 2.5-3 gallons boiling at a good rate.

In order to boil all 5 gallons at once, I need to upgrade my equipment ... and now that I'm actually looking at costs, it's really not as expensive as I thought it was to upgrade to full boils.
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Old 05-25-2012, 05:39 PM   #9
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I didn't realize there that big a difference either.

Hmmmm, now I'll DEFINITELY need a wort chiller.

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Old 05-25-2012, 06:39 PM   #10
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I'm not too convinced that there's that much of a difference yet. I think I've mentioned before that one main we look at is alpha acid utilization from the hops, assuming we're doing an all extract beer. Lower utilization may mean too much sugar, or not enough water.

I wish I could do a side by side of no-boil vs full boil, but I've been lazy and have just been going no-boil for extract beers but I haven't noticed an issue, and neither have my testers. I do often wonder about the calcium carbonate reaction with sorghum vs heat though.

For grain, that's different. Full boil all the way.

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