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Old 12-12-2012, 04:45 AM   #1
lpsumo
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Default GF Braggot without sorghum

First off, I am very new to brewing and have never made anything except a few meads. Mead seems kinda fun, but I miss my stouts so I thought this would be a good way to introduce myself to beer brewing.

So far, most gluten free brew recipes I have read use sorghum. Sorghum is the only grain I have found that turns my guts liquid within an hour. My stomach HATES it.

I'm wondering if you guys have any suggestions on how I would proceed with this braggot. Is it possible to simply mix grains with honey and ferment it?

Any advice is welcome, thank you

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Old 12-12-2012, 04:54 AM   #2
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I have not made a braggot before, but I have made a few GF beers. You might want to try a little buckwheat or millet. The only problem is that you usually have to malt these yourself.

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Old 12-12-2012, 01:24 PM   #3
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http://ryanbrews.blogspot.com/2009/0...raggot_08.html
You just need to find a substitute for the 1lb of 2-row.
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Old 12-12-2012, 03:40 PM   #4
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I've been having a blast for the last few months making ales with brown rice syrup and honey, specifically buckwheat honey and wildflower honey. I have an experimental hoppy stout fermenting now that also incorporates some molasses. This is fairly easy "extract" brewing and a nice way to get started making gluten-free ales, at least in my opinion. I read about a lot of folks diving in with grains and, while I might get there, I see a lot of reports of failed experiments whereas I've loved every brew I've made.

Before I got started with brown rice syrup, I made a batch of what I guess would be considered a hydromel/metheglin - just honey (wildflower + clover), water, and (lots of) hops. It ferments out to be a lot drier than a typical beer, but using ale yeast and bottle-carbonating it like beer yields something that I really love. You can add maltodextrin at bottling time to thicken it up, which I did for my first batch, but I have another batch bottled where I left it alone and am eager to see if I like it as much left thin.

Jeff

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Old 12-12-2012, 05:15 PM   #5
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Jeff--what is your recipe on the hoppy mead? I've enjoyed my dry-hopped cider so much I'm very curious to start experimenting more in that area.

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Old 12-12-2012, 08:06 PM   #6
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I made something of an ale/braggot with millet, and thought it was awesome.

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Old 12-13-2012, 01:42 AM   #7
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Hey Jeff, thanks for the input

I would be interested in any recipes you have tried as I am at a loss on how to get started here

Something like that, do you ferment it like a mead or a beer? Mix it all together in a carboy at room temp and leave it for 2 months?

mpcondo, I have a bunch of millet, do you still have your recipe kicking around?

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Old 12-13-2012, 04:02 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lpsumo View Post

mpcondo, I have a bunch of millet, do you still have your recipe kicking around?
1.25 lbs of millet, malted and dried in oven
1lb honey
.25 oz cascade hops
safbrew T-58 yeast

I malted the millet myself, although using a little enzyme with unmalted millet would work. I used a double decoction mash on the grain followed by a 60 minute boil. Added a pinch of the hops every 15 minutes. After a week in primary I racked to secondary and cold stored it for a week to clear it before bottling and used 1 oz of honey as priming sugar .
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Old 12-13-2012, 05:21 PM   #9
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My process has been to approach it just like brewing ale from extract. Since you're coming from a mead background, here's my quick rundown of what this means:

  • Do a boil of water for somewhere between 30-60 minutes
  • Add bittering hops early in the boil - how much/what kind is recipe-specific
  • Add flavor/aroma hops later in the boil - again, varies based on recipe
  • Add extracts (honey, brown rice syrup) later in the boil - I've been doing the last 15 minutes - varies based on recipe
  • Cool wort (I use a stopped sink and fill it with ice packs) down to near room temperature
  • Transfer wort to carboy, add nutrient and yeast, stop with airlock
  • Sometimes dry-hop, recipe dependent
  • After 2-3 weeks (depends on ferementation progress), rack to a bottling bucket, add priming sugar (I use honey despite all advice I've read to the contrary), transfer to bottles
  • Bottle-condition N weeks (where N varies from "I can't resist sampling after 4-5 days" to "It's really best when you wait 2-4 weeks")

If any of that sounds really super alien to you, you might want to do some general reading up on getting started with extract brewing. But that's basically the process.

As for specific recipes, I love the hopville.com site's "Beer Calculus" recipe formulator. They've got a good database with all the stuff I work with pretty well represented. The original gravity readings usually are dead-on with what I measure, and final gravities will be off depending on how much of my recipe uses honey, since ale yeasts really seem to go to town on honey and ferment out much drier than expected - you can play with this by customizing the attenuation percentage on the yeast, but it's a guessing game and I don't have hard math behind that part yet.

Here are some of the recipes I've used:
My first all-honey hoppy hydromel/metheglin thing
A new take on that with all noble hops instead of American IPA-style hops - I just bottled this Saturday and haven't tasted it yet
Pilsner-like ale made with rice syrup and honey - this is the best thing I've brewed, period. Golden yumminess, and a good match in color and texture for a pilsner
Blackstrap stout - this is an experiment, just about ready to get bottled. I got excited after reading that folks like George Washington used to brew with molasses. I probably overdid it.
An attempt at a Gluten-free clone of Sierrra Nevada's Celebration Ale - just bottled Saturday, haven't tried it yet.

Most recently I finally decided to try a brew with sorghum, since I wanted to brew a GF clone of a crazy strong IPA called Pliny The Elder and figured it would be a good time to try it. That's just in the fermenter now.

Hope this helps! I'm no brewing genius yet, but I've been having a blast. I still drink normal barley beer when I'm out, but I enjoy the GF brews I make for myself and my gluten-sensitive wife a lot more, partly just 'cause I made them, and partly because they give me all the pleasure of drinking ale without the heavy gut feel I get from the "real" stuff.

Jeff
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Old 12-13-2012, 05:30 PM   #10
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Also note with my recipes that the volume and boil times vary. I started off brewing all 1-gallon batches and still do for experiments I'm unsure about. But since I've brewed a few batches I loved, I sprung for a larger kettle and fermenter I could use to do 4-gallon batches.

I favor shorter boils for all-honey brews and longer boils for brews involving rice syrup where i'm going for a bitter IPA type result. But again, I'm no expert, I just kind of made up that rule of thumb after doing a lot of research.

Jeff

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