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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > GF Beer that Tastes Like ... Beer?
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Old 05-16-2013, 02:00 AM   #1
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Default GF Beer that Tastes Like ... Beer?

I've never had a GF beer or have attempted to make one, but I have a couple of friends who are GF that I'd like to brew for.

The GF recipe database is pretty slim and I was wondering/hoping if it were possible to brew something similar to a GF version of BierMuncher's Centennial Blonde - something rather light that would take hops and citrus rather well. Something crisp & light? Extract recipes would be preferred.

For those who don't know, Centennial Blonde (the extract recipe) is basically 1 lb Carapils for head stability and 5 lbs of extra light DME. Are there GF extracts that would do the same jobs without any off flavors?

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Old 05-16-2013, 02:21 AM   #2
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Short answer, no. Sorghum is just going to have that taste. Rice syrup doesn't provide "maltiness". Buckwheat honey can make up for it. You can make some very good beers but, they aren't going to taste like "normal" beer until you go all grain.

Go into it trying to make good beer but, not to mimic barley. Centennial blonde is a very easy, good recipe. I would start with sorghum, rice syrup, light candi syrup, buckwheat honey, and maltodextrin. Use the same hop schedule and yeast.

Someone should be able to point you in a good direction. I don't do extract brew anymore. I might be able to find you a recipe I used a long time ago if you want. Good luck. Its not as hard as it seems to do gluten free.

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Old 05-16-2013, 02:33 AM   #3
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While not officially GF Omission beer does taste like beer and lacks gluten.

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Old 05-16-2013, 05:03 PM   #4
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I've said this before: beer is beer. Whether you make it from barley or buckwheat, beer is beer.

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Old 05-16-2013, 05:12 PM   #5
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Beer is beer. Barley has the advantage of 1000s of years of cultivation and genetic modification to make better beer. Just don't go in trying to replicate barley. I personally don't see the point in trying to make it taste like that anyway. Play to the strengths of your fermentables.

Omission is not gluten free. It is gluten reduced. Even that is a stretch. Its not even that great either.

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Old 05-16-2013, 05:43 PM   #6
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I agree with Osedax. Beer is a drink made with grain. Millet is a grain. Corn is a grain. Buckwheat is a pseudo grain. By the definition you are using, wheat beer is not a beer because it has not been made with barley. But it is. just because it is considered "Normal" due to it being used for centuries. Using gluten free grains and trying to make it taste like barley isn't going to work. That's like trying to get a leek to taste like a banana, then complaining that it doesn't taste like a banana. Use the taste that the gluten free grains produce and mix it with adjuncts and hops that work with it to produce a great gluten free beer.

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Old 05-16-2013, 08:27 PM   #7
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I agree, omission was exciting at first because I wanted to remember that taste but now the excitement has worn off, I actually prefer my brews or a greens, or even a Bards. But never Redbridge, that's gross swill

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Old 05-16-2013, 09:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvanLouis View Post
I've said this before: beer is beer. Whether you make it from barley or buckwheat, beer is beer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ash_Mathew View Post
I agree with Osedax. Beer is a drink made with grain.
a traditional definition is beer = barley + hops + water+ yeast + other things, sometimes. that traditional definition holds that if you're missing one of those main ingredients, like barley, it isn't beer.

a definition that i like is from wikipedia: "an alcoholic beverage produced by the saccharification of starch and fermentation of the resulting sugar." GF beers qualify by that standard, i believe.

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By the definition you are using, wheat beer is not a beer because it has not been made with barley.
FYI wheat beers are never 100% wheat. i haven't come across a recipe that calls for more than 60%, 40% is pretty typical. the rest is barley.
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Old 05-16-2013, 10:28 PM   #9
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But that is exactly our point. Just because people think it is 'traditional' doesn't make it the only one or the only way. Especially when Sorghum beers have actually been around a lot longer than barley/wheat beers. People just assume that barley beers are the norm, and if anything else does not have it in is not.

Does it really matter that you have never seen a 100% wheat beer? Somebody will have tried it. Does that mean it is not a beer? No. It has grain. It has hops. It has water. It has yeast. Regardless of what grain is used it is a beer. Each grain tastes differently which is why brewers use different grains to bring different flavours. Isn't that the whole point of brewing? To experiment with different ingredients? Try new things. Otherwise, what's the point. Just buy some commercial beer. At least that way you know it will be chock full of barley.

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Old 05-17-2013, 12:07 AM   #10
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There are plenty of debate threads on what constitutes a beer. FYI, Grätzer/Grodziskie is an all smoked wheat beer made in Poland. Even Germans used to make all wheat beers and they are the ones that made the Reinheitsgebot. History lesson over.

I honestly could care less what some old, stuffy German thought in 1516. I'm just trying to help a man make a beer.

Seriously though, the gluten free recipe section is slim (it was just created a few months ago) but it has some good recipes in it. Most gluten free brewers have to try harder because its not proven yet and gluten free ingredients tend to be much costlier.

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