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Old 10-01-2010, 03:33 PM   #21
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You could still use it for large batches. This is your "specialty grain" that you don't need a whole lot of anyways, right? I think I'll eventually get a coffee roaster and try it, if anything I just use it for coffee

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Old 10-01-2010, 06:27 PM   #22
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True for both. I'll wind up doing the same, and may see about hitting the store this or next week. I'll check on the size of a grid-bottomed air popper to see if the mesh is small enough not to let anything drop through.

The other one, which is better for coffee, had it dropping into the fan and the defunct heat coil.

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Old 10-05-2010, 05:09 AM   #23
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It seems that the lower grate style air popper has a chance of working. The size of the grains and the airflow creates quite a bit of movement and I expect to be able to toast half a pound and reasonably more this way. I don't know what the results will be yet, because even with a foot long chimney attached to the popper, I had quinoa and millet spraying out all over.

I expect that it will work since I tested millet and quinoa, which I feel have the smallest grain size, but I have a feeling I'll need a slightly taller removeable chimney and an airflow director.

I'll let you know any further results when I try that next. I'm behind on my beer making and need to catch up on it. I still don't know how much use it would be when people are doing malted grains unless a combination of both works. I'll be sticking with extracts for a few more gallons first, since I'll only have had 6 weeks as of Wednesday of beer brewing. My first attempt is finally getting to the point of drinkability. Too bad there's only two bottles left from the original gallon.

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Old 10-19-2010, 01:52 AM   #24
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During my last 4 gallon tests, I've realized I've had a bit of an oops moment. I was using a calculator (not beersmith) to approximate the OG and expected FG and abV% of several Safbrew T-58 brews. However, it seems that the OG is somewhere in the area of 1.120=1.130 rather than the 1.060-1.080 that I was looking for. After a week in the primary, I haven't tested it, but it seems rather high, and after discussing it with a co-worker, he agrees and we wondered about diluting the secondary with water. All I wound up doing was topping it off with some boiled and cooled water(which may be a mistake). This seems to have reactivated the fermentation, and is probably going to throw my expectations for FG out the window.

Is this likely to taste like fizzy cough syrup once it's finished, and if the sugar content is expected to be that high at the end, is there a good idea on how to carbonate it other than pressurizing it in a container? (I'd wind up having to use a seltzer bottle or something.) Or should I leave it in the secondaries for an extended period?
A quick taste test during the racking did have a sweet cough syrup flavor from the unfermented sugar.

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Old 10-19-2010, 01:58 AM   #25
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I don't think I saw it, but can you post the recipe? That might help us calculate what your OG would have been- I am assuming you didn't take a gravity reading...

How long has it been in primary? Are you sure fermentation did actually take off (an OG would have helped determine this by comparing it to what you have now)? I think I've read somewhere around here about using Champagne yeast in a situation like this but do not take my word for it.

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Old 10-19-2010, 02:26 AM   #26
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All 4 batches were expected to be 2.5 pounds of sorgum syrup and half a pound of brown rice syrup solids. (I expect that should have been syrup come to think of it). And one gallon of water. Hop schedules were:
.5 ounce 60 minutes
.25 ounce 15 minutes
(remainder .25 was for dry hopping).
and a bit of irish moss for the last 10 minutes.
Set 1: Yakima Magnum
Set 2: WGV
Set 3: German Perle
Set 4: U.K. Kent Golding

The OG was:
Set 1: 1.11
Set 2: 1.12
Set 3 and 4: 1.13
OG temperature was not taken.
I thought it had seemed a bit high since I was looking for 1.08, but I had put it down to the temperature being over 60 degrees. Later I found that there's no way temperature correction would account for the difference.

The first fermentation did start by the next morning and was in for a week, each had a layer of froth and was bubbling steadily.
It finished the first racking on Friday with a rather thick sediment layer. It was put into the secondary with the hops and about a cup of room temperature water. The fermentation restarted quickly for three of them, with the fourth lagging a bit (I had thought it had stopped). So far, there's been no odd smells or wierd growths. I unfortunately didn't write down the OG reading I had taken, which I'm blaming on the vicodin that I was on for the week.
If it wasn't due to the restarted fermentation for the WGV batch, I would have tried putting it into a seltzer bottle and sampling it tomorrow before asking.

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Old 10-19-2010, 02:49 AM   #27
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Okay- your OG's are in the right spot. In my experimental batches where I boil 1.5 gallons of water to yield between .85 and .75 gallons into the fermenter I usually use a little over 1 lb of fermentables. That said, you about tripled it and any hop utilization you would have had went out the window. You were boiling a VERY thick wort.

Now, I don't know the technique for fermenting a beer with an OG that high but my guess is that you now need to use a yeast that will bring the OG down and can work in that environment. DKershner probably has some insights on this and can correct anything I've already said that was wrong.

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Old 10-19-2010, 02:57 AM   #28
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Champagne yeast is probably your best bet and I would an entire packet (5 grams) for each batch you made just to be safe. Here are some threads that might give you more info, I just skimmed them- and there are similar threads at the bottom of each of them.

What happens to high gravity beer if you dont add champagne yeast?

Lalvin-EC1118 Champagne yeast for beer?

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Old 10-19-2010, 02:59 AM   #29
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Yeah, my first 4 trials were using 1 pound to one gallon. I think I'll stick to that for further hop and yeast experiments until I better understand attenuation and fermenting temperatures. Since the only space I have is my closet, or the bathtub, it's been about 70 degrees ambient, which could mean that it's been running hot as well.

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Old 10-19-2010, 03:14 AM   #30
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That sounds like it would work pretty well, similar situations to what I did it seems. In which case I'll just let it continue to finish fermenting and take another reading before either reracking or just adding a wine yeast. I have to hit the store for yeasts for cider anyways now that busy time at work is through.

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