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Old 07-24-2013, 07:19 AM   #41
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Yeah man, I was just kidding. Going to have to check out their website. I am wanting to do the same thing over here, I am just hoping that somebody drops a couple of grand in the street. I can't see them shipping it to me here, and if they did, I reckon I would have to remortgage. Haha But, if I can get some tips from them, should be good. It is an exciting time, finally wheatards across the world are being listened to, and we are getting what we want and deserve.

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Old 07-24-2013, 11:16 AM   #42
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I have emailed Tim at CMC for advice on how to achieve different styles other than crystal. I Will hopefully hear something back before I go on Holiday tomorrow.

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Old 07-28-2013, 11:03 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by igliashon
Not sure about their shipping, if I recall it's not too bad if you order a decent quantity. I ordered about 90# of various specialty grains, came out to about $0.98/lb for shipping cost, or around $89 total. Not bad.

I don't mean to come off like I'm trying to promote their product, it's just reaaaaaaalllllllly friggin' exciting to me that I can just *buy* any kind of specialty grain now. Assuming their grains are high-quality, that means I can literally make any kind of beer I want now, with proper color and (presumably) proper flavor. I haven't used their crystal yet so I can't necessarily endorse it, but in the coming months I'll definitely have something to report. I ordered 25# each of crystal 20 and crystal 60, as well as 25# of black patent millet malt and 5# of black unmalted buckwheat rated at 400 SRM (plus some pale millet malt to compare to Grouse). I have no idea why this entire board isn't creaming its collective shorts over this, because to me, this is pretty much the start of the revolution!
Did I read in one of your posts that you were going away from the promalt now? How do you plan to mash with the new grains? Thx
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Old 07-30-2013, 07:12 AM   #44
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Did I read in one of your posts that you were going away from the promalt now? How do you plan to mash with the new grains? Thx
I've been experimenting quite a bit with just using the enzymes in the grains. However I think using amylase in combination with the natural enzymes will yield the best results. Why do a decoction when you can just add amylase? My current mash schedule is to do a step mash at 120, 135, 145, 158, and 180, then top off with cold water to bring down to 150 and add amylase. But that's a kludgy way of doing it and I think I can streamline it. Either way, the endogenous enzymes do a much better job of breaking down the proteins and glucans, I get a much clearer wort with better head retention (not to mention FLAVOR) doing it this way. No more losing a gallon to trub in every batch!
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Old 07-31-2013, 11:07 AM   #45
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My current mash schedule is to do a step mash at 120, 135, 145, 158, and 180, then top off with cold water to bring down to 150 and add amylase.
This sounds similar to the mash process described in the Gluten Free Brewing, All Grain Brewing Tutorial, by Andrew Lavery that is provided on http://www.glutenfreehomebrewing.org. He does a 40C, 55C, 70C, boil, cool to 70C, then 65C. After the 55C he pulls off "clear liquid" as it contains the enzymes required for conversion . He states these enzymes have an operating temperature range of 60- 70C and are destroyed at temperatures above 70-75C. However, the starches in gluten free malt do not fully gelatinise and become available to be converted to sugar until heated to temperatures of 75-85C. Which is why he removed the enzyme liquid from the mash and keep it at <60C to preserve the enzymes, he then added some extra water to the mash and raised it to 70C to convert whatever starch is available and reduce the viscosity prior to boiling. The boiling (or raising to 85C for 30 min) will gelatinise the rest of the starch. After the mash has cooled he added the enzyme liquid back to the mash and the alpha and beta amylase can go to work on the gelatinised starch.

Is this similar to what you plan to do? I haven't tried it yet as i'm still researching.
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Old 08-01-2013, 04:56 AM   #46
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Yeah, except I don't intend to grind to a flour or decant the liquid containing the enzymes. One thing no one tells you in brewing chemistry is that things like gelatinization temperatures or enzyme activation temperatures aren't "hard", they're just the top of the bell curve. In any case, in Andrew's method, the only enzymes you're really getting out of the decanted liquid are saccharification enzymes, and those are readily available on the homebrew market. I'd rather just add those than go through the hassle of decantation. Without adding any enzymes or doing any cereal mashing, i.e. just doing a four-step infusion mash with rests at 120, 135, 158, and 180, I've gotten efficiencies up to 68% when using only malted millet, though that gives a very dextrinous wort that is not highly fermentable. The enzymes are necessary to get the efficiency up and decrease the dextrins. I'm trying to figure out if any saccharification is in fact taking place during the 145 rest, as that's a new step I added (foolishly) at the same time that I added the post-mash-out temp-drop and enzyme pitch. It's probable that it could be skipped, but in any case the last beer I did with that method had a 75% efficiency (attenuation TBD, it's still fermenting). What I *should* do is a bunch of one-gallon super-scientific test batches with different mash schedules and enzyme additions. But who's got time for that?

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Old 08-01-2013, 08:10 PM   #47
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Thanks for the details. Whar enzymes will you be using? Can't wait to hear the results. I'm anxious to start some all grain again.

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Old 08-02-2013, 02:26 AM   #48
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Those are some great tips. Its exactly what I have been telling people. I have not been very successful with step mashes. The enzymes in millet don't seem to take kindly to it. Not sure if its the temps or the time.

Try a single infusion mash with a mash out. Sparge like normal. Head retention suffers a bit. Clarity is a bit of a problem as well. However, its so much simpler. I have done a lot of batches with just grains and no zymes. I've have been seeing as much as 80% eff. Just my 2 cents.

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Old 08-02-2013, 09:48 AM   #49
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What temps are you mashing at, and mash out?

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Old 08-02-2013, 10:04 PM   #50
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Normal mash temps. 149-158. I recommend higher than lower. Mash out at 170. You do higher. Most gluten free grains don't have husks, so you won't extract near as much tannins.

Remember, this is with millet and quinoa. Other grains require different methods.

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