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Old 03-12-2011, 12:50 AM   #11
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Well this beer has gone south. The rice malt after fermenting makes the mixture very sour and bitter. Today I'm going to throw in cherries, some cocoa and some dry hops in a hope of restoring it to a drinkable state. Will give it a week and throw if it doesn't improve.

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Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

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Old 03-12-2011, 01:44 AM   #12
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You've mentioned rice malt a few times. Exactly what are you referring to? Brown rice syrup / syrup solids, malted rice, or rice prepared via sake methods?

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Old 03-12-2011, 02:01 AM   #13
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Looking at this, I'm wondering what the rice malt was, and what was the sorghum (was it just sorghum syrup from the store?) and how was 10% of that 'dark candi'?

You may not have had much in the way of nutrients here for the yeast, and then you've got a lot of strong, bitter flavors (cocoa, coffee). And if these were all syrups, you may not have had much in the way of unfermentables left (what was the final gravity?)

How much coffee did you use?

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Old 03-12-2011, 04:45 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorklord View Post
Looking at this, I'm wondering what the rice malt was, and what was the sorghum (was it just sorghum syrup from the store?) and how was 10% of that 'dark candi'?

You may not have had much in the way of nutrients here for the yeast, and then you've got a lot of strong, bitter flavors (cocoa, coffee). And if these were all syrups, you may not have had much in the way of unfermentables left (what was the final gravity?)

How much coffee did you use?
About 500 mls of cold pressed coffee

Rice syrup is this one, http://www.glutenfreeshop.com.au/Pro...ProductId=2512

Sorghum syrup was pre prepared with dark candi syrup from the place I bought it. They were sold out of sorghum syrup at the time.

Final gravity at the moment is 1012.

Open to an suggestions for fixing this one. Would prefer not to ditch it.
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My gluten free home brewing blog.
http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com/

Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

All gluten free.

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Old 03-12-2011, 03:01 PM   #15
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Well, I'm not sure what would cause the sourness, but the cure for bitterness might be something sweet (it would have to be unfermentable, so lactose?)

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Old 03-12-2011, 10:08 PM   #16
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I've ditched this brew. It just tastes horrible and I know there is no point continuing with it.

Not good having your first failure but hopefully I can learn from this.

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My gluten free home brewing blog.
http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com/

Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

All gluten free.

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Old 03-12-2011, 11:42 PM   #17
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I hate to say it, but I just can't get my head around why this would have gone sour. Maybe you had an infection?

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Old 03-13-2011, 12:23 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by dorklord View Post
I hate to say it, but I just can't get my head around why this would have gone sour. Maybe you had an infection?
When I did half and half, sorghum and rice malt with hallertaur hops in an ale, it was also sour. Not as sour or bitter as this, but it would make sense that if the rice malt made the other one sour, it could with this one.

Or maybe the yeast fermenting at too high a temperature. But I haven't had problems with US-05 or WB-06 at the same or higher temps.

I'm going to go back to sorghum only for the next two and see how I go. Have been very thorough with keeping infections out, so I hope it isn't the case.
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My gluten free home brewing blog.
http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com/

Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

All gluten free.

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Old 03-13-2011, 03:23 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spaced View Post
When I did half and half, sorghum and rice malt with hallertaur hops in an ale, it was also sour. Not as sour or bitter as this, but it would make sense that if the rice malt made the other one sour, it could with this one.

Or maybe the yeast fermenting at too high a temperature. But I haven't had problems with US-05 or WB-06 at the same or higher temps.

I'm going to go back to sorghum only for the next two and see how I go. Have been very thorough with keeping infections out, so I hope it isn't the case.
What were the recipes you used on previous successful brews?

Also, how warm was the fermentation?
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Old 03-13-2011, 04:33 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorklord View Post
What were the recipes you used on previous successful brews?

Also, how warm was the fermentation?
This was the first recipe
http://gfhomebrewing.com.au/index.ph...d=13&Itemid=39

and

This was the second brew
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/adv...m-malt-218142/

I can't control temperatre here, so I use a room with good circulation and put ice bricks in, morning and evening. The brew probably sits at 24 to 26 celcius.
__________________

My gluten free home brewing blog.
http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com/

Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

All gluten free.

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