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Old 03-11-2012, 08:29 PM   #11
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How's it look? Did I f*** it up, spaced? Beer calculus puts the O.G. around 1.107, and the IBU's at 64--I'm aiming for closer to an imperial IPA than your recipe, but we'll see how it turns out.
I can't comment on mashing as I've only ever done extract. But that hop combo is great. They will combine very well.


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Old 03-31-2012, 10:34 PM   #12
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So, my plan was to rack this to secondary today and start the dry-hop, but I decided to take a hydrometer reading and preliminary taste-test. Imagine my surprise when the hydrometer reads 0.994--after the OG reading was just a bit over 1.1! (And yes, I did a full-wort boil with this one, so there's no mixing problem). Guess that's what I get for using the Super High Gravity Ale yeast!

So I took a taste. Hop aroma is very good, but the beer is thin and hot with not a lot backing up the hop flavor. There's a bit of saltiness and...something phenolic, perhaps? I think I really blew this one, cooled too slow, pitched too hot, and too weak (no starter). Shoulda stuck verbatim to the recipe, instead of being a doofus and thinking I could modify it well. Chalk this one up to a learning experience. Gonna try this one again and stick straight to the recipe.



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Old 04-01-2012, 02:58 AM   #13
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So, my plan was to rack this to secondary today and start the dry-hop, but I decided to take a hydrometer reading and preliminary taste-test. Imagine my surprise when the hydrometer reads 0.994--after the OG reading was just a bit over 1.1! (And yes, I did a full-wort boil with this one, so there's no mixing problem). Guess that's what I get for using the Super High Gravity Ale yeast!

So I took a taste. Hop aroma is very good, but the beer is thin and hot with not a lot backing up the hop flavor. There's a bit of saltiness and...something phenolic, perhaps? I think I really blew this one, cooled too slow, pitched too hot, and too weak (no starter). Shoulda stuck verbatim to the recipe, instead of being a doofus and thinking I could modify it well. Chalk this one up to a learning experience. Gonna try this one again and stick straight to the recipe.
.994? Temp adjusted? Have you double checked your hydrometer in plain water? Sure it couldn't have been getting stuck on side of the test jar?
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Old 04-01-2012, 03:17 AM   #14
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.994? Temp adjusted? Have you double checked your hydrometer in plain water? Sure it couldn't have been getting stuck on side of the test jar?
I know, I KNOW. It seems crazy. But yes, yes, yes. Checked straight out of the carboy, which was near dead-on 68°F according to the stick-on "fermometer". I wobbled the hydrometer around several times because I couldn't believe it. No, it wasn't stuck. I let it sit for like 10 minutes, thinking it would change. It didn't. Yes, I checked my hydrometer after the fact in room-temperature plain water and it's reading a perfect 1.000. I'm looking at it as I type this, and it's hanging out right where it should be. Yes, the hydrometer and sample jar were dry when I added the beer.

I have NO IDEA WTF happened in that carboy. There was a good inch and a half of sediment, maybe even two inches, which I figured was mostly oat proteins (the wort was SUUUUPER milky and took forever to clear up) but it seems like the yeast really went hog-wild. FWIW, the sample came right off the top of the beer, and I have my doubts that the gravity reading would have come out the same after racking and stirring up a bit of sediment. However, the beer tasted like burning when I tried it, so I reckon there was some fusel production from the high pitching temperature.

I really f***ed this one up, guys. Woof. Thankfully I've got enough ingredients to re-brew it tomorrow. Gonna keep it simple this time. Normal gravity, straight sorghum extract and honey. And gonna brew it proper, cool it quickly, and pitch a normal dry yeast, like US-05 or something.
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Old 04-02-2012, 02:14 PM   #15
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A few things I learned doing GF (that's gluten free...get your mind out of the gutter )

Don't go crazy with the adjucts trying to compensate for flavor . Using a bunch of different adjucts or a whole lot of one can create some weird flavors.

Brown sugar or molasses do not add a malty flavor (it sure seemed like a good idea at the time)

Cascade and amarillo hops have been my favorites to use

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Old 04-02-2012, 08:51 PM   #16
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I know, I KNOW. It seems crazy. But yes, yes, yes. Checked straight out of the carboy, which was near dead-on 68°F according to the stick-on "fermometer". I wobbled the hydrometer around several times because I couldn't believe it. No, it wasn't stuck. I let it sit for like 10 minutes, thinking it would change. It didn't. Yes, I checked my hydrometer after the fact in room-temperature plain water and it's reading a perfect 1.000. I'm looking at it as I type this, and it's hanging out right where it should be. Yes, the hydrometer and sample jar were dry when I added the beer.

I have NO IDEA WTF happened in that carboy. There was a good inch and a half of sediment, maybe even two inches, which I figured was mostly oat proteins (the wort was SUUUUPER milky and took forever to clear up) but it seems like the yeast really went hog-wild. FWIW, the sample came right off the top of the beer, and I have my doubts that the gravity reading would have come out the same after racking and stirring up a bit of sediment. However, the beer tasted like burning when I tried it, so I reckon there was some fusel production from the high pitching temperature.

I really f***ed this one up, guys. Woof. Thankfully I've got enough ingredients to re-brew it tomorrow. Gonna keep it simple this time. Normal gravity, straight sorghum extract and honey. And gonna brew it proper, cool it quickly, and pitch a normal dry yeast, like US-05 or something.
I don't know how it's gotten below 1, but there you go. I'd still throw it in bottles and put it right up the back of the cupboard. Pull out a bottle in say six months, and then a year. Give it time to get better.

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Originally Posted by Noontime View Post
A few things I learned doing GF (that's gluten free...get your mind out of the gutter )

Don't go crazy with the adjucts trying to compensate for flavor . Using a bunch of different adjucts or a whole lot of one can create some weird flavors.

Brown sugar or molasses do not add a malty flavor (it sure seemed like a good idea at the time)

Cascade and amarillo hops have been my favorites to use
Yeah the "fruity" type hops mix really well with the sorghum.
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Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

All gluten free.

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Old 04-03-2012, 04:02 PM   #17
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I've had good success with brown rice syrup as well.

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Old 04-03-2012, 04:54 PM   #18
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I don't know how it's gotten below 1, but there you go. I'd still throw it in bottles and put it right up the back of the cupboard. Pull out a bottle in say six months, and then a year. Give it time to get better.
Normally that's exactly what I would have done, but the headache I got off the hydrometer sample (I drank about 2 oz of the stuff, that's all) suggested mega fusels, which don't really go away with time. From what I've read, phenolic tastes also don't tend to improve with aging, either.

And also I'm not terribly optimistic about the douglas fir gruit I just bottled, it had an unpleasant salty taste and some weird "vegetable soup" flavor happening, so that one is already getting the "back of the cupboard" treatment. As did the heather braggot that was my second GF brew, but it may be doomed to an eternity of under-carbonation because I just "eyeballed" the priming sugar, as I didn't have a scale then. So that's two batches already getting the "just wait a few months and keep your fingers crossed" treatment, plus the first gruit (which is going to be good, but needs aging for proper style, as it's practically a barley-less barleywine at around 9%). I haven't had one of my own beers since I drank the last of my first batch in January, because everything I've brewed has "gone up the back of the cupboard"!

That, and I'm about a week or two short of having enough bottles for another bottling, and would rather bottle my porter (which is done and tasted delightful in the hydrometer sample, perhaps my first "good" gluten-free beer)...meaning the faIl-PA would be tying up a carboy for probably another month. So I cut my losses and re-brewed , because by the time I'd have been ready to bottle, I'll have a new and properly-brewed IPA in its place.

It was a great learning experience, though! Well worth the cost of a dumped batch, as I'm a much better brewer for it today. Most important lesson: get some tried-and-true beers in your cupboard before going off the deep end with experimentation! Then you don't feel bad about having to give one the "back of the cupboard" treatment.
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Old 04-03-2012, 05:06 PM   #19
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A few things I learned doing GF (that's gluten free...get your mind out of the gutter )

Don't go crazy with the adjucts trying to compensate for flavor . Using a bunch of different adjucts or a whole lot of one can create some weird flavors.

Brown sugar or molasses do not add a malty flavor (it sure seemed like a good idea at the time)

Cascade and amarillo hops have been my favorites to use
All good advice. Especially the "don't go crazy with adjuncts" part.

Brown sugar and molasses both have their place in certain styles, but indeed do not seem to add "maltiness". I put some brown sugar in my "swamp thang gruit", and it came out tasting ever so slightly sherry-like, which blended really nicely with the spicy herbal flavors, it's gonna be a great "holiday" beer. A surprise success, given I brewed it when I still didn't have a friggin' clue about proper gravity or how to balance a beer. Molasses so far hasn't seemed to hurt anything, I've added about a cup of it to three different 3-gallon batches and have yet to be able to pick it out in the flavor profile. Definitely nothing "malty" coming from it, but I reckon it belongs in the base of a porter, along with some D-180 candi syrup.

Amarillo are nice, haven't brewed with them, but St. Peter's Sorgham ale, one of the best commercial GF beers I've had, uses amarillo exclusively. I still have a LOT to learn about hops, thinking about doing a run of single-hop batches...but that's gonna have to wait awhile, as I haven't begun to drink any of the six batches I've already brewed and I'm running out of places to stash bottles!
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Old 04-16-2012, 12:43 AM   #20
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I just took a hydrometer sample of my 2nd attempt at spaced's recipe, I'm at target FG (1.012), and holy crap is this good beer. I brewed the original recipe, modified ever so slightly by adding a pound of amber candi syrup (D-45) and the zest of half a grapefruit (at flameout). Gonna add the dry hops today and bottle next weekend, but I really gotta say, I've never had something taste this good straight out of primary. I think my general techniques are improving (full-wort boils, quick immersion chilling, no hop bags, healthy yeast), but honestly this is the first beer of my own I've ever tasted that was *good* right out of the primary. It's gonna be smashing, for sure! So glad I dumped the first batch and re-brewed.



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