Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Collective Wisdom on GF IPAs
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-01-2012, 10:45 PM   #1
igliashon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 924
Liked 60 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default Collective Wisdom on GF IPAs

Well, with the rash of recent threads here on GF IPAs, and with me itchin' to brew one myself, I thought I'd ask everyone who's brewed one to completion what they've learned from the experience and what they'd do differently in the next batch. I don't want to make the same mistake anyone else has made . A common thread I've noticed is people lamenting the lack of a malty back-bone...I reckon extra dextrin and copious use of adjuncts might correct that. Anything else ya'll can think of? Particular hop varieties that do or don't work well in a GF brew? Adjustments to hop quantities (more or less?) when brewing gluten-free? Any recipes that worked well or failed catastrophically?

__________________
igliashon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-01-2012, 11:11 PM   #2
spaced
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Posts: 303
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Brew this, then enjoy

http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com.au...pired-ipa.html

With only 9 days in the bottle this is already looking like the peak of my ipa experience. Only noted issue is not enough body, I'll probably up it to 8 oz of maltodextrine next time.


And for a really simple recipe, this tastes great. Centennial is excellent in a single hop ipa

http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com.au...r-brewing.html

__________________

My gluten free home brewing blog.
http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com/

Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

All gluten free.

spaced is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-02-2012, 03:38 AM   #3
igliashon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 924
Liked 60 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spaced View Post
Brew this, then enjoy

http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com.au...pired-ipa.html

With only 9 days in the bottle this is already looking like the peak of my ipa experience. Only noted issue is not enough body, I'll probably up it to 8 oz of maltodextrine next time.

http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com.au...r-brewing.html
The recipe from the link is:

Angry Scotsman IPA
---------------------------------
1Kg Sorghum Syrup @ 60 minutes
168g Maltodextrine @ 60 minutes
28g Columbus @ 60 minutes
28g Cascade @ 15 minutes
1/2 Whirlfloc tablet @ 15 minutes
28g Amarillo @ 10 minutes
1tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 10 minutes
20g Cascade @ 5 minutes
400g Iron Bark Honey @ Flameout
1.8Kg Sorghum Syrup @ Flameout
*** Cold Crash ***
US-05 Fermentis American Ale Yeast

Grrr...metric! I'll have to convert that before I can use it, but I like math so no problem. I take it this is a 5-gallon batch (or what, a 19-liter batch)? So I'll have to reduce appropriately for a 3-gallon batch, as that's what I brew. Looks good though, I'll give it a shot! Though I note that you don't include any adjunct grains, just extract and honey. I'll probably toss in 2 lbs of toasted malted quinoa, or may 2 lbs GF oats instead...oats might give better body and sweetness to back up the hoppy bitterness.

Two questions, though: why add most of the sorghum at flameout, and what's iron bark honey (and what's the flavor like, so I can find a good sub)?

Thanks, mate!
__________________
igliashon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-02-2012, 11:40 PM   #4
igliashon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 924
Liked 60 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default

Picked up my ingredients today for a 3-gallon batch of the above recipe, with the following substitutions: centennial hops instead of amarillo, because my LHBS doesn't have amarillo; irish moss instead of whirlfloc; buckwheat honey instead of iron bark honey; nottingham instead of US-05 because I want to boost the OG a bit and the guy at my LHBS said the notty would be more tolerant. Toying with the idea of adding a touch of rosemary and juniper in the last 10, but might opt to play it safer. I always want to throw the kitchen sink at every batch! Will probably brew it up Monday.

Still wondering about why the recipe calls for adding more than half the sorghum at flameout, though.

__________________
igliashon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-02-2012, 11:54 PM   #5
Flatspin
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 163
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I haven't had great luck with sorghum syrup (maybe I'm just particularly sensitive to it's flavors), although I like your choice of hops. Columbus is a great assertive hop and should be great with cascade in this recipe. Since it's an IPA, I would definitely suggest that you add some dry hops, but you don't need to have those on hand right now, since you won't add them until after fermentation dies down. Any of the hops you have in your recipe would make a good dry hop, and I'm also a big fan of centennial, which would blend well with the flavors you have going.

Also, the reason I have found - partly from experience and partly from reading here - that adding LME as a late addition will prevent wort darkening from Maillard reactions during the boil. I also think that it cuts down on some of the harsher LME flavors, although to know that one for sure, I think a side-by-side experiment would be in order.

__________________
Flatspin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2012, 01:09 AM   #6
igliashon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 924
Liked 60 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flatspin View Post
I haven't had great luck with sorghum syrup (maybe I'm just particularly sensitive to it's flavors), although I like your choice of hops.
Well, I forgot to mention--I'm gonna do 50/50 sorghum/rice solids, and add 2 lbs toasted GF oats. I have no idea how it'll work, I've tried this grain bill in one brew so far but it's still in secondary and I haven't tasted it yet. Seems like a reasonable combo to me, though. And it's spaced's hop recommendations I'm going on...most of the beers I've brewed have been gruits of some shape or another, so my hop knowledge is pretty weak (for now). Definitely gonna dry-hop, though--do ya think the centennial will be good for that? I'll have plenty of hop left-overs, since my LHBS sells hops in 2-oz increments and I'll be using no more than 1 oz of any of them in the boil for my 3-gallon batch.

Quote:
Also, the reason I have found - partly from experience and partly from reading here - that adding LME as a late addition will prevent wort darkening from Maillard reactions during the boil. I also think that it cuts down on some of the harsher LME flavors, although to know that one for sure, I think a side-by-side experiment would be in order.
Ah, one of those hotly-contested aspects of homebrewing, eh? Like whether or not to secondary, or full-boil vs. partial, pellets vs. whole hops? Well, what the heck, I'll give it a go--add the rice solids at the start, and honey and sorghum at flameout. Thanks for the tip!
__________________
igliashon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2012, 07:09 AM   #7
spaced
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Posts: 303
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by igliashon View Post
The recipe from the link is:

Angry Scotsman IPA
---------------------------------
1Kg Sorghum Syrup @ 60 minutes
6oz Maltodextrine @ 60 minutes
1 oz Columbus @ 60 minutes
1oz Cascade @ 15 minutes
1/2 Whirlfloc tablet @ 15 minutes
1oz Amarillo @ 10 minutes
1tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 10 minutes
0.7oz Cascade @ 5 minutes
1 pound Iron Bark Honey @ Flameout
1.8Kg Sorghum Syrup @ Flameout
*** Cold Crash ***
US-05 Fermentis American Ale Yeast

Grrr...metric! I'll have to convert that before I can use it, but I like math so no problem. I take it this is a 5-gallon batch (or what, a 19-liter batch)? So I'll have to reduce appropriately for a 3-gallon batch, as that's what I brew. Looks good though, I'll give it a shot! Though I note that you don't include any adjunct grains, just extract and honey. I'll probably toss in 2 lbs of toasted malted quinoa, or may 2 lbs GF oats instead...oats might give better body and sweetness to back up the hoppy bitterness.

Two questions, though: why add most of the sorghum at flameout, and what's iron bark honey (and what's the flavor like, so I can find a good sub)?

Thanks, mate!
I converted the easy ones. I think the sorghum is about 6 pounds.

Half at the start and half at the end is supposed to cut down on the sorghum twang. Does it? No idea to be honest, but it can't hurt.

With the iron bark honey, that's just something readily available in Australia. It's not as sweet tasting as clover honey but I would try buckwheat honey if you can get it. Or even some dark candy syrup.

I top my fermenter up to about 21L after chilling my concentrated boil.

I would definitely try it with roasted grains/oats.

N.B. This Recipe is dry hopped with 2 oz of Amarillo. Highly recommend it. This recipe is not for non-hop heads......they're just not cool enough to get it


Quote:
Originally Posted by Flatspin View Post
I haven't had great luck with sorghum syrup (maybe I'm just particularly sensitive to it's flavors), although I like your choice of hops. Columbus is a great assertive hop and should be great with cascade in this recipe. Since it's an IPA, I would definitely suggest that you add some dry hops, but you don't need to have those on hand right now, since you won't add them until after fermentation dies down. Any of the hops you have in your recipe would make a good dry hop, and I'm also a big fan of centennial, which would blend well with the flavors you have going.
I really fell in love with Columbus hops with this recipe. I really like the way they taste as a bittering hop. I'm planning a pale ale with half an ounce for bittering.

And the 2oz Amarillo dry hop is a must for that recipe.
__________________

My gluten free home brewing blog.
http://gfhomebrewing.blogspot.com/

Drinking: Hopped Honey IPA
Fermenting: 2 Ciders with S-33 Yeast, Summer Pale Ale and a West Coast IPA
Planning: Belgian Triple, Blood Orange Wit and American IPA

All gluten free.

spaced is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2012, 12:32 PM   #8
Flatspin
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 163
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spaced View Post
I converted the easy ones. I think the sorghum is about 6 pounds.

Half at the start and half at the end is supposed to cut down on the sorghum twang. Does it? No idea to be honest, but it can't hurt.
I'm sure with enough searching you could find someone on this site who has already done the early vs. late addition experiment, but I think those sort of things are part of the fun of brewing!

Quote:
Originally Posted by igliashon View Post
Definitely gonna dry-hop, though--do ya think the centennial will be good for that? I'll have plenty of hop left-overs, since my LHBS sells hops in 2-oz increments and I'll be using no more than 1 oz of any of them in the boil for my 3-gallon batch.
Dry hop really adds a great aroma. So if you smell a couple of your hop varieties and really like it, try dry-hopping them. I haven't had a chance to brew with Amarillo yet, but the consensus sure seems to be that it has an awesome aroma.
__________________
Flatspin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-10-2012, 06:52 AM   #9
igliashon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 924
Liked 60 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default

Brewed this up tonight, waiting for it to chill so I can pitch the yeast. The final (modified) recipe I used:

"Outer-Spaced Oatmeal IPA"

3 gallon batch:

Steep at 150°F for 1 hour (probably unnecessary but what the hey, let's pretend there's some enzymes happening):
1 lb Lightly toasted GF quick-cook oats
1 lb "experimental fake crystal malt" (GF oats soaked in sugar-water, then kiln-dried in the oven and slightly toasted)

Then:
Bring to boil, add 3 lbs rice syrup solids and 1/2 lb raw sugar
0.75 oz columbus hops for 60 min
0.75 oz cascade hops for 15 min
0.75 oz centennial hops for 10 min
0.5 oz cascade hops for 5 min

At flameout, add 3 lbs sorghum syrup and 1 lb buckwheat honey

Chill to 78°F, pitch White Labs "Super-High Gravity Ale" yeast

Gonna dry-hop with the centennial--love the grapefruit smell of these!

How's it look? Did I f*** it up, spaced? Beer calculus puts the O.G. around 1.107, and the IBU's at 64--I'm aiming for closer to an imperial IPA than your recipe, but we'll see how it turns out.

__________________
igliashon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-10-2012, 07:59 AM   #10
igliashon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 924
Liked 60 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 40

Default

Measured O.G. was just a bit above 1.100...but I also found a bunch of undissolved syrup stuck to the bottom of the pot. Lesson learned: the "inverted plate at the bottom of the pot to keep the nylon hop and grain bag from touching the bottom" trick only works for all-grain recipes--found some seriously burnt crud under that plate! I worry that most of the gravity came from the oat starch, since before even adding the sugars, the wort had a rather thick consistency, and there's all that undissolved/burnt stuff...and the wort looks as milky as a cup of chai. Maybe 2 lbs of oats was too much for a 3-gallon batch? Oh well, it'll be interesting to see what happens.

__________________
igliashon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools