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Old 05-17-2012, 05:51 PM   #1
muench1
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Default CO Malting Company - Malt price, Availability and Analysis

Figured this would be interesting for you guys. I made the following order enquiry:

Quote:
Gluten Free - Colorado Malted Red Millet: Yes
# lbs. Needed: (5lb Increments): 25

Gluten Free - Colorado Malted Buckwheat: Yes
# lbs. Needed: (5lb Increments): 10

Gluten Free - Colorado Malted Quinoa: Yes
# lbs. Needed: (5lb Increments): 10

Gluten Free - Colorado Malted TEFF: Yes
# lbs. Needed: (5lb Increments): 10
And got the following response:
Quote:
Thanks for contacting us! We can gladly get you the Malted Red Millet an the Malted Buckwheat but we are out of the other products.

The price on these is $1.50 per lb

Millet - $37.50
Buckwheat - $15.00

Shipping - $40.19

TOTAL - $92.69

Could have it there in a week

Let me know if you would like to proceed. A

Also have to let you know, because we are not yet certified gluten free any or all of our gluten free grains may contain traces of gluten due to processing and handling.

Thanks!
So shipping appears to be in the neighborhood of $1/pound (at least to CA), bringing the net price to around $2.50/pound.
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Old 05-18-2012, 01:30 AM   #2
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Wow, I better learn to brew all grain!

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Old 05-18-2012, 05:31 PM   #3
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So I got the malt analyses. I'm no scientist, but it sure looks like enzymes are virtually non-existent

cmc-millet.jpg   cmc-buckwheat.jpg  
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Old 05-18-2012, 10:49 PM   #4
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Less than 5% conversion...laaaaaame. I wonder what their mashing techniques were like, though? I mean, at the lab. Maybe they just did a standard 60 min at 150°F mash; the studies I've read seem to suggest that a different mash schedule gets better results than the usual.

Still, maybe I'll hold off on ordering from these guys until after trying to mash some unmalted grains with amylase. I didn't realize how cheap amylase is!

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Old 05-19-2012, 03:49 AM   #5
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Yellow Yam is an enzyme powerhouse, I'm thinking I might order their malt and try a side-by-side test with and without exogenous enzymes and see what happens.

The thing is that even with shipping it's not really any more expensive than buying straight grain.

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Old 05-19-2012, 04:34 AM   #6
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Is yellow yam different than the sweet potatoes you can get at the store? I know that there are yams found in Asia and South America of the genus Dioscorea, which are different than the cultivars of Ipomea batatas that are sold in most supermarkets, is that what you're talking about?

I kind of doubt that sweet potatoes are a more cost-effective source of enzymes than amylase powder; if my reading has been correct, it only takes a couple grams of the stuff to convert enough grain for a 5-gallon batch, and you can get a pound of the stuff for $8.45 (about $0.01 per gram). I like the purist approach, but money is money.... Still, I'd be interested in the results of this experiment.

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Old 05-19-2012, 08:05 AM   #7
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Yes, I mean Discorea as opposed to Ipomea, although both are supposed to be good. I guess you read the same paper I did, Effect of Exogenous Enzymes on the Sugar Content of Wort of Different Sorghum Varieties? It definitely seems to indicate that yield of reducing sugars should be monstrous from the yams.

What enzymes are in your "amylase" though? The enzymes at work aren't just one type of amylase. I figure the enzymes naturally occurring in nature would be pretty well proportioned, and I like the idea of a plant ingredient more than adding a powder additive. Also I figure the added fermentable(s) from the potato/yam could be used to effect. As somebody (I think you!) said, we should be going out there trying to find BETTER beer, instead of just trying endlessly to replicate barley

Worth trying both, I just really don't want to put in all the work to do a properly controlled side-by-side comparison.

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Old 07-07-2012, 09:25 PM   #8
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Question Exogenous Enzymes

This is great info. I have also read the article mentioned and linked to. I would really like to try using yellow yam (Discorea Cayenesis) but the article doesn't seem to give enough info on how the "crude enzyme extract" was obtained. How could a person apply this info? It doesn't seem that the researches simply added chopped yellow yam to the mash. Maybe a french press method could be used?

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Old 09-05-2012, 10:46 PM   #9
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Default Conversion as a percent?

Quote:
Originally Posted by igliashon View Post
Less than 5% conversion...laaaaaame. I wonder what their mashing techniques were like, though? I mean, at the lab. Maybe they just did a standard 60 min at 150°F mash; the studies I've read seem to suggest that a different mash schedule gets better results than the usual.

Still, maybe I'll hold off on ordering from these guys until after trying to mash some unmalted grains with amylase. I didn't realize how cheap amylase is!
A proper reading of the listed malt analyses, contrary to the print:
Conversion <5%, would be conversion took place in less than 5 MINUTES.
A typo on the report.
A reading of several other CoA's indicates the Conversion reading is a time-frame test, speed of conversion, not a percent.
The percent of interest is obviously Fine Grind Extract.
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Old 09-06-2012, 06:04 AM   #10
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i personally haven't used any of the above ingredients, but would like to just chime in on CO malting co. i got in on a group order here in denver with 150lbs of their colorado pale 2-row. they do a quality job and have a quality product (in the 2-row). i am very satisfied. just wanted to pop that in the thread.

hope you guys find yourselves just as satisfied if you place an order.

b

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