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Old 06-07-2010, 02:01 PM   #31
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ive been libating and scheming,
i was almost thinking of experimenting with a big GF beer, ive been watching this video by brewdog brewery of scotland. they made a 30+% stout called tactical nuclear penquin. so i was thinking about doing a double ferment. fermenting with an ale yeast, waiting for a stuck ferment, then pitching a champange yeast and seeing what it does again. prolly adding 10-15lbs of a sugar. heres a recipie that im kind of pondering.
into 5 gal
mash 4-8# of millet with amalyse
7# tapioca syrup
3.5# sorghum syrup
3-5# clover honey
8oz maltodextrin

something like
8oz of hops

pitch an ale yeast

3 weeks later pitch a champang yeast

find a way to freeze the fermenter and decant everything not frozen from the ice.

keg and force carb and become very very stupid

thoughts, opinions, concerns, alterations?
Hmmm...well, uh...I'm not sure where to start..

Have you had success converting millet in the past? What is your malting schedule like with it? Is the maltodextrin really necessary since you are going to be concentrating it anyways?

It just seems like a lot of fermentable sugar to start with and going into a boil you are going to have some pretty thick wort.

If I were going to do this I might brew a 1080 beer and add the rest of the sugar over the time of the ferment and then switch to champagne yeast later on, you'll probably need a starter for that though...

And to freeze it, I might use 2L coke bottles or something to keep from breaking glass...

Just my .02
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Old 06-07-2010, 03:18 PM   #32
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Making an Eisbock is one of the most difficult practices to pull off successfully in brewing, and you want to do it with GF grains that don't convert themselves? I cannot advise strongly enough against this unless you have some gobs of brewing experience I am not aware of.

First of all, no maltodextrin. This thing is already going to be a milkshake no matter what you do.

You need lots of stuff in there that finishes LOW. Corn sugar is a good start, I have no idea what tapioca as a primary fermentable tastes like or finishes at. Honey is borderline, but you need something to give this flavor of some sort. Your grain bill is interesting, have you ever tried something similar in composition to this? Making a huge beer certainly won't make it taste any better.

Have you considered how long you are going to age a 20+% beer? If it were me, I would probably wait about a decade. I had some 120min IPA, and it was maple syrup and fire. Unless you want fire, AGE LONG. It doesn't taste good.

When you do the initial giant pitch of ale yeast, maybe 10 packs or so, let it ferment two days, and slowly each day add more sugars. Honey, corn sugar, tapioca, all could easily be added in the fermenter, and therefore should be. Then I would skip champagne and go straight to WLP099. Champagne doesn't have the alcohol tolerance you desire.

Those are just my initial thoughts, there are probably several other variables you have to deal with.

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Old 06-07-2010, 03:50 PM   #33
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Making an Eisbock is one of the most difficult practices to pull off successfully in brewing, and you want to do it with GF grains that don't convert themselves? I cannot advise strongly enough against this unless you have some gobs of brewing experience I am not aware of.
Basically what I thought last night when I read this...I was thinking "theres no way this will work..." Nice thought though, and if you do try it, post your notes please sir
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Old 06-07-2010, 04:13 PM   #34
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Basically what I thought last night when I read this...I was thinking "theres no way this will work..." Nice thought though, and if you do try it, post your notes please sir
It's possible.

I was contemplating doing something like this on the non-GF side of my brewing, but decided against it due to the aging requirements and the fact that it doesn't taste very good. GF really wouldn't be all that much harder, both would probably need amylase anyway. Although, this would be the most difficult thing I have ever taken on, and I have been brewing for 6 years and hundreds of gallons. Incredible control to not contaminate, knowing what yeast does and what it means in near all brewing scenarios, having yeast culturing equipment, and having brewed several successful 12%+ beers would be what I would consider a baseline for even making an attempt.
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Old 06-07-2010, 04:40 PM   #35
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It's possible.

I was contemplating doing something like this on the non-GF side of my brewing, but decided against it due to the aging requirements and the fact that it doesn't taste very good. GF really wouldn't be all that much harder, both would probably need amylase anyway. Although, this would be the most difficult thing I have ever taken on, and I have been brewing for 6 years and hundreds of gallons. Incredible control to not contaminate, knowing what yeast does and what it means in near all brewing scenarios, having yeast culturing equipment, and having brewed several successful 12%+ beers would be what I would consider a baseline for even making an attempt.
Well at least your advice is a starting point for any takers
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Old 06-07-2010, 04:48 PM   #36
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I'll help anyone through it, but first brew a Barleywine at 12% that gets to below 1.030. That way you are at least familiar with what it takes to get some lazy yeast in gear.

I wish there was a GF beer you could taste that was 15%+. The best way I can describe it is a combination of winey, sherry, scotch, & maple syrup flavors with the consistency and look of beer. You could and should easily go straight to 100IBU, because it will still taste VERY malty.

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Old 09-21-2010, 07:52 PM   #37
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Anyone else brewing this weekend? I'm brewing up my Gluten Free Pumpkin Ale Saturday- hopefully.

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Old 09-21-2010, 08:01 PM   #38
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Anyone else brewing this weekend? I'm brewing up my Gluten Free Pumpkin Ale Saturday- hopefully.
I am brewing up a glutenous and a gluten free version of 'Merriment', this year's holiday spice ale. Recipes will probably be finalized over the coming days.
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Old 09-21-2010, 08:10 PM   #39
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I'm hoping to start my stout-ish GF mash this weekend or by next at the latest.

On freezing to gain ABV(I've done it to make cider jack, but never beer) is the flavors are WAY concentrated so any flaw in the original product will be exaggerated. IE if it's a little sour it's going in it will come out puckering you like lemons etc... you get the point. Getting something to ferment to 12-15% is easy enough with the right yeast and proper control of temperatures, but getting something there that still tastes good.............not so easy.

If you do try definitely take good notes and share your conclusions. Sounds like a fun learning experience if nothing else. I dare say at the least you will be able to make something that can make you act stupid

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Old 09-21-2010, 08:28 PM   #40
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On freezing to gain ABV(I've done it to make cider jack, but never beer) is the flavors are WAY concentrated so any flaw in the original product will be exaggerated. IE if it's a little sour it's going in it will come out puckering you like lemons etc... you get the point. Getting something to ferment to 12-15% is easy enough with the right yeast and proper control of temperatures, but getting something there that still tastes good.............not so easy.

If you do try definitely take good notes and share your conclusions. Sounds like a fun learning experience if nothing else. I dare say at the least you will be able to make something that can make you act stupid
Yes, I definitely didn't want to discourage anyone from doing this eventually, but maybe make the base beer, then a BIG base beer, then freeze concentrate once you have a REALLY awesome tasting BIG beer. I just didn't want anyone to waste a whole ton of time and not learn anything from the process.
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