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Old 04-29-2012, 09:44 AM   #1
400d
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Default 100% buckwheat ale

hey guys, I'm new to GF brewing. it seems that I might have gluten intolerance. at this moment I'm waiting for the results of blood analysis....

meanwhile, I'm reading about GF brewing, just in case.

I wonder is it possible to brew 100% buckwheat malt beer? let's say I can malt 10lb of buckwheat.... can I use it as only fermentable in my grain bill?

thanks

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Old 04-29-2012, 02:06 PM   #2
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Hmm, good question.

From Alcohol, Its Production, Properties, Chemistry, And Industrial Applications:

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[unmalted] Wheat contains a good proportion of diastase, but not enough to give the full yield of alcohol unless some malt is added. Buckwheat approximates to wheat...
From Kilning conditions for the optimization of enzyme levels in buckwheat:
Quote:
Buckwheat is a novel ingredient in malting and brewing, and therefore, requires optimization of the malting and brewing processes. In this study, three temperature regimens, 48 hr at 40°C (KR1), 5 hr at 40°C + 11 hr at 50°C (KR2), and 5 hr at 40°C + 3 hr at 50°C + 3 hr at 60°C (KR3) were used to kiln green buckwheat malt produced from grains steeped for 12 hr at 10°C and germinated for 96 hr at 15°C. Kilning regimens KR1, KR2, and KR3 produced malts with a moisture content of 6.8, 6.2, and 5.7%, respectively. Although an increased enzymatic activity level in buckwheat malt was noted with increased thermal exposure during the kilning regimen, it is not reflected in its brewing characteristics with regard to extract and apparent fermentability after using an optimized mashing system. However, the effect of treatment at higher temperatures with respect to enzymatic activity levels in buckwheat malt is reflected by rapid visco analysis where decreased peak viscosities correlate to an increased amylolytic activity level. The results of this study suggest that buckwheat, kilned using KR3, which was found to contain highest levels of amylolytic enzymes and produced the highest levels of total soluble nitrogen and free amino nitrogen when optimally mashed, be recommended for the kilning regimen of buckwheat green malt.
Those sources would indicate to me that 100% buckwheat is pretty capable of making a decent ale.

I've not tried buckwheat yet- I'm still working on sorghum. Most everything I've read about buckwheat makes it sound like you can just buy and malt buckwheat groats and it should be fairly easy like Quinoa is.

The few accounts I've heard of straight buckwheat brewing made it sound like mashing and sparging were challenging because they just got porridge from the buckwheat and had difficulty separating wort from the gooey mess. Go try it for yourself and come post results! Make sure you report back on your malting success, too!
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Old 04-29-2012, 05:39 PM   #3
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I've done one myself. The beer came out very strange. First, I had huge problems sparging, as stated above. If you were to do it, I'd include a mass of rice hulls. Next, if you're committed to the idea, I'd make sure you're malting procedure is solid. My beer had a ton of off flavors and ended up tasting pretty rancid. This could have been due to an infection, but there were no visible signs. You lose about 1/4 of the original grain weight in malting, so for 10 lbs of finished malt, you need about 13.333 lbs of grain to begin. Don't let me discourage you're experiment. It's viable, just difficult.

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Old 04-29-2012, 05:41 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mloster View Post
I've done one myself. The beer came out very strange. First, I had huge problems sparging, as stated above. If you were to do it, I'd include a mass of rice hulls. Next, if you're committed to the idea, I'd make sure you're malting procedure is solid. My beer had a ton of off flavors and ended up tasting pretty rancid. This could have been due to an infection, but there were no visible signs. You lose about 1/4 of the original grain weight in malting, so for 10 lbs of finished malt, you need about 13.333 lbs of grain to begin. Don't let me discourage you're experiment. It's viable, just difficult.

how would you describe those off flavors?
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Old 04-29-2012, 08:49 PM   #5
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I haven't done 100%, but I have done a pretty high percentage.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/hef...weizen-234898/

I could't imagine going higher, unless you're goal is to make a buckwheat beer and let it be what it is. It won't taste like any beer you used to drink, but that doesn't mean you won't like it.

The only thing I can say about the taste is that it tastes like buckwheat. Cook some and that flavor will be what you taste in the beer.

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Old 04-30-2012, 04:12 AM   #6
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For the first week after carbonation, the beer tasted pretty good. I wouldn't call it beer, but it was a hopped, carbonated somewhat malty beverage. After another week, I opened one with one of my friends. He said it tasted like salami and I would have to agree. So by off flavors, I mean salami. Yeah it's pretty weird. I think there was some spoilage due to the high protein content of the buckwheat.

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Old 05-02-2012, 11:10 PM   #7
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i was wondering the same.

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Old 05-02-2012, 11:35 PM   #8
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I would think that either 100% millet or 100% quinoa would work better than 100% buckwheat. I'm curious about amaranth, too, but haven't read much on it. Or heck, what about a 100% sweet potato beer? Sweet potato can convert itself, evidently. Not much hope for different roasts, but I'm definitely planning to experiment with an all-sweet potato blonde or pale ale.

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Old 05-03-2012, 02:21 AM   #9
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100% anything so far hasn't seemed to give good sensory characteristics. The more sweet potato in a brew, the higher alcohol, esthers and bitter flavors were found. I think someone also mentioned a "slippery" effect from sweet potato.

Pretty much every grain/fermentable has it's own problem and characteristics. I highly doubt we will really want to do a 100% anything. (People do however, since there is 100% millet and 100% sorghum "beers" and 100% rice sake which happens to be great.) It's unique properties can be an attraction in itself. I think once we refine our processes we'll probably be looking at various combinations and even the possibility of 100%s. more than likely will be that we will be using various combinations of malted grains and adjuncts like some have already done with mixed results. However, most official studies have been of straight processed grain, not necessarily toasted.

A study on buckwheat did a straight pale malt beer with buckwheat, and it appears that it wasn't all that great. Unique flavor, buttery, etc.

But if we do something else with them it could work
For example, a combination of:
malted millet
sweet potato
crystal malt buckwheat?

Or different varieties of sweet potato?
Sweet potato using a combination of raw and baked?

Sweet potato and unmalted sorghum?

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Old 05-18-2012, 03:08 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM View Post
100% anything so far hasn't seemed to give good sensory characteristics. The more sweet potato in a brew, the higher alcohol, esthers and bitter flavors were found. I think someone also mentioned a "slippery" effect from sweet potato.

Pretty much every grain/fermentable has it's own problem and characteristics. I highly doubt we will really want to do a 100% anything. (People do however, since there is 100% millet and 100% sorghum "beers" and 100% rice sake which happens to be great.) It's unique properties can be an attraction in itself. I think once we refine our processes we'll probably be looking at various combinations and even the possibility of 100%s. more than likely will be that we will be using various combinations of malted grains and adjuncts like some have already done with mixed results. However, most official studies have been of straight processed grain, not necessarily toasted.

A study on buckwheat did a straight pale malt beer with buckwheat, and it appears that it wasn't all that great. Unique flavor, buttery, etc.

But if we do something else with them it could work
For example, a combination of:
malted millet
sweet potato
crystal malt buckwheat?

Or different varieties of sweet potato?
Sweet potato using a combination of raw and baked?

Sweet potato and unmalted sorghum?
This makes a lot of sense. I think over time we will find a mixture of grains that will compliment each other well and have a nice final result.

This is much the same as the best gluten free bread recipes. Most have at least 4 or more different types of flour in them.
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