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Old 01-24-2013, 01:21 PM   #1
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Default Yeast washing quick question please

I just racked my Irish Red beer into a carboy, and i'm sterilizing a 48 oz spaghetti jar right now and it's lid, then will put the water and jar into the fridge to cool. I have closed my bucket and sealed it and left the air lock in.

Once cool, I plan on dumping the water into the bucket, swirling it around, and then pouring 48oz of that into the jar and sealing it.

The question is, I don't have any pint jars right now, so will probably go out and buy a few later today. Is it ok to leave the 48oz jar in the fridge this way for a few days, and then do the next washings when i get the smaller jars? I figured i'll turn this into two pint size yeast containers in a few days.

Or do i need to rush out and get them now?

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Old 01-24-2013, 03:15 PM   #2
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Any that can help me with this question?

Also, this is in a fermenting bucket. Do I need to spray sanitizer on the side of the bucket where I am pouring this out?

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Old 01-24-2013, 03:24 PM   #3
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Yes, you can leave it for a few days in the big jar and split it later. I've just finished doing this same thing last night. The first step should actually be to swirl up in your large jar, let rest for 20-30 minutes so the trub can settle, and then decant to get the good yeast solution separated from the thick trub. Effectively, one large jar into one large jar.

No, no need to spray sanitizer on the side of your bucket. Also, be careful of foreign drops of water when pouring from vessel to vessel (i.e. condensation drops, sanitizer drops, etc). Use a clean paper towel to dry the container you're pouring out of before pouring to avoid these drops.

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Old 01-24-2013, 03:29 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stpug View Post
Yes, you can leave it for a few days in the big jar and split it later. I've just finished doing this same thing last night. The first step should actually be to swirl up in your large jar, let rest for 20-30 minutes so the trub can settle, and then decant to get the good yeast solution separated from the thick trub. Effectively, one large jar into one large jar.

No, no need to spray sanitizer on the side of your bucket. Also, be careful of foreign drops of water when pouring from vessel to vessel (i.e. condensation drops, sanitizer drops, etc). Use a clean paper towel to dry the container you're pouring out of before pouring to avoid these drops.
Ok thanks. Currently I have ONLY 1 48oz jar I have sanitized. I need to buy more.
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:39 PM   #5
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Or you can just pour it all into the jars you have and save that.

Yeast washing removes some of the protein and other trub, but also removes 95% of the viable yeast.

To quickly sanitize a clean glass jar I have a spray bottle with whiskey in it. I spray it, let it sit for a few seconds, then rinse it. Most of the time you can skip the rinse because there's nothing wrong with drinking whiskey.

See here:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...revisited.html

Here is the simple way I save yeast:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...t-storage.html

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Old 01-24-2013, 04:09 PM   #6
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Well what I did, was instead of pouring all 48 oz of water in, i poured about 20 oz in, swirled it around a good bit, and then filled up about 90% of the jar and closed the lid. I'll check it in about an hour to see what kind of separation happens.

When I siphoned the beer today, I didn't hardly leave any of the liquid. Maybe about 8 oz. So hopefully there won't be a ton of beer in it.

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Old 01-24-2013, 04:28 PM   #7
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Based on what woodlandbrew indicates, you don't need to worry about separating any layers/trub/proteins/etc. Just split your large jar into equal smaller jars and store. You'll retain a much higher cell count this way with only a slightly less viability. PLUS, it's much easier

Thanks Woodlandbrew!!

For the record, my process goes like this:
-Siphon off as much beer as possible (I usually have about 4-8 oz left in carboy)
-Pour in about 32 oz preboiled chilled water
-Swirl it all up in the carboy into a very thick slurry (I usually swirl to get sediment into the slurry but leave a ring of caked material on bottom of carboy). This caked material is usually the most darkly colored trubby stuff.
-Pour slurry into 64 oz jar, top up with preboiled chilled water, and give a good shaking (consistency is like mud)
-Wait 20 minutes, pour 95% of the mud-thick slurry into containers for storage, and top up containers with preboiled chilled water. The 5% left behind is again usually the most coarse, darkly colored material.
-After refrigerating for days, I usually have 1/3-1/2 full pint and halfpint containers. I aim to minimize loss of good yeast material but strive to leave behind some trub material. I also attempt to use clean boiled prechilled water at every step to reduce "beer" content, and to reduce headspace in my containers as much as possible.

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Old 01-24-2013, 04:40 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stpug View Post
Based on what woodlandbrew indicates, you don't need to worry about separating any layers/trub/proteins/etc. Just split your large jar into equal smaller jars and store. You'll retain a much higher cell count this way with only a slightly less viability. PLUS, it's much easier

Thanks Woodlandbrew!!

For the record, my process goes like this:
-Siphon off as much beer as possible (I usually have about 4-8 oz left in carboy)
-Pour in about 32 oz preboiled chilled water
-Swirl it all up in the carboy into a very thick slurry (I usually swirl to get sediment into the slurry but leave a ring of caked material on bottom of carboy). This caked material is usually the most darkly colored trubby stuff.
-Pour slurry into 64 oz jar, top up with preboiled chilled water, and give a good shaking (consistency is like mud)
-Wait 20 minutes, pour 95% of the mud-thick slurry into containers for storage, and top up containers with preboiled chilled water. The 5% left behind is again usually the most coarse, darkly colored material.
Yep I agree, I didn't add too much water. After I put it in the jar, I lightly shook it for about 10 seconds. So now it's sitting on the counter sealed. I'll give it a solid hour to see what the seperation looks like.

Now as far as storage, I probably won't get jars until tomorrow, or maybe clean out a few in the fridge and use them

Should I store this in the fridge or on the counter for now?
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Old 01-24-2013, 04:52 PM   #9
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I always go with fridge but my guess is that it won't make much difference for a day. The pressure in the container seems to NOT build as quickly in a fridge.

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Old 01-24-2013, 05:03 PM   #10
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I'm still not seeing much separation at all. I just released the lid a little, let out some CO2, re-sealed it and put it in the fridge. I'll check it again in an hour.

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