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Old 10-26-2009, 04:29 PM   #531
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Sweet

Thanks for the refresher on yeast washing. Judging from my notes of 5 years ago, this is almost exactly what I used to do. Can't wait to try it again this week or weekend when I rack to secondary.

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Old 10-29-2009, 03:51 PM   #532
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Hope this wasnt answered and I missed it .....

If I take and wash the yeast following the instructions given in this thread ... and fill 4 mason jars.... How much yeast is that in each jar.

In other words ..... wanting to make a say ... 250 billion cells in a starter .... what Im I starting with?

Thanks for any input.

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Old 11-05-2009, 10:37 AM   #533
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Thanks so much for this great post. I'm getting ready to wash my first batch of yeast, from my Xmas Ale I'm bottling tomorrow and I have question that's not so much to do with the washing as it is with prepping the jars.

I just finished boiling my new mason jars and they came out with a white, hazy film on them. I scoured some canning forums and saw several places referring to this being common with water that has a lot of minerals in it. I live in San Diego and we have pretty hard water, so I assume these are just mineral deposits from the 20 minutes they spent boiling. The fix they suggest is to add some white vinegar to the water and that will get rid of the film. Obviously I can't do that if I'm using the water they are boiled in to suspend the yeast so my questions are:

1. Has anyone else had this problem? Is it mineral film? Or something to do with the new jars, maybe I needed to was them better?

2. Do you think the jars (and the water in them) are safe to use? Or should I dump them and start over.

3. In future batches do you think it makes sense to boil them in a vinegar spiked water to eliminate the film. Then drain them, like you would for canning, and fill them with either separately boiled water or distilled water?

Hopefully I'm worried about nothing but I thought I'd run it past the hive mind and see what comes back.

Thanks again.

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Old 11-06-2009, 06:42 PM   #534
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This is an awesome thread. We should all be saving a ton of money even if we wash only one time. I do have an issue with my first attempt, which brought up something that I didn't see in any of the pictures. I followed the instructions up to the point where I had to divide the slurry into 4 smaller jars. My daughter was sick, and I had to tend to her before I could divide the jar up. I figured I wouldn't get to it right away, so I threw the jar in the fridge. It's been sitting in the fridge for a week now, and I have three layers. One is a cloudy liquid layer, which gets clearer by the day, below that is a thick dark layer which has some dark sediment floating just above it. The third layer is a lighter layer, which looks like what you'd see in a White Labs vial. I'm guessing that the lighter thick layer on the bottom is the yeast, and everything else should be poured off leaving me with pure yeast which can be divided, or pitched into a starter. Am I correct in this thinking, or did I mess the whole thing up and should dump it. I did this with 2 batches on the same day, so I actually have 2 batches that I'd like to keep, but If I flubbed it, then I'll know for next time. Any suggestions or help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance for any answers

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Old 11-06-2009, 07:06 PM   #535
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Just a data point, I've had problems getting washed yeast to reactivate after over a month in the fridge. I've had good results with washed yeast less than 2 or so weeks in the fridge. Your mileage may vary. In large part, I've switched to pitching on top of existing yeast cakes.

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Old 11-08-2009, 10:12 PM   #536
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similar question to mikeysab--This was my first attempt at yeast washing. It may be hard to see in the attached picture, but I think I failed in not disturbing the trub too much. You can see a lot of gunk at the bottom and a thin yeast layer--these were supposed to be my "final" jars. Can / should I sanitize some more jars in iodophor (while I brew today, it would be fairly easy) and then decant again? The jar on the far left looks better than the others--the rest have a distinct dark layer at the bottom and a thin layer of lighter color above that. Or should I just let it be? thanks for any advice!

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Old 11-09-2009, 02:21 AM   #537
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yours is the complete opposite of mine. My dark layer is on top of the lighter layer. Don't really want to do anything till I get an answer from someone who knows about this stuff.

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Old 11-09-2009, 02:46 AM   #538
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I've had some yeast that had a couple layers like yours. I took some disposable pippets I had from cynmar and collected a couple of samples from the layer that I knew was yeast and made a small starter. I then stepped it up till I had a big enough colony.

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Old 11-12-2009, 04:36 PM   #539
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I decided to wash again by boiling some more jars, shaking up the old jars to re-suspend the yeast, waiting for some trub to settle, and then transferring. It looks like it came out much better. So it seems that if you still have trub, just wash again.




Quote:
Originally Posted by commonlaw View Post
similar question to mikeysab--This was my first attempt at yeast washing. It may be hard to see in the attached picture, but I think I failed in not disturbing the trub too much. You can see a lot of gunk at the bottom and a thin yeast layer--these were supposed to be my "final" jars. Can / should I sanitize some more jars in iodophor (while I brew today, it would be fairly easy) and then decant again? The jar on the far left looks better than the others--the rest have a distinct dark layer at the bottom and a thin layer of lighter color above that. Or should I just let it be? thanks for any advice!

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Old 11-18-2009, 05:36 PM   #540
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So I tried this for the first time last week, and ... holy crap it was easy. So easy. Unbelievably easy. If you're reading this thread and haven't tried yeast washing yet because it looks difficult and complicated ... just do it.

Anyway, to save room in the fridge, I first used 2 quart-sized jars, let them sit for about 24 hours, then decanted into 4 4-oz jelly jars. As the pic shows, it's pretty much all yeast in there, no trub. But my question is: since these jars are pretty small, is the yeast in one of them enough for a regular-sized starter? Or should I combine the yeast into 2 jars? I'm honestly not interested in having to start with a smaller starter, then step it up (at least for a normal OG beer), since, well, that's more work than I wanna do. If that's the case, I'd rather just combine them.

EDIT: Oh, these have been sitting there for about a week.

What do y'all think? Thanks in advance for any advice!

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