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Old 10-28-2008, 09:23 PM   #221
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That's what I'm talking about.
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Old 11-02-2008, 07:33 PM   #222
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^ holly crap you used the same yeast over 50 times ??? wow

if you subtract the cost of a decently expensive yeast from a batch, you can brew pretty much any 5 gallon batch AG for like 10 bucks lol
I exaggerate a lot. But realistically. I used the original vial made a batch. Harvested 5 jars, 4 small ones then a larger quart one. I used the yeast in the larger jar to make about 5 more batches. Gave one smaller jar to my friend. Then used the other jar to make 7 batches. All batches of course... you could harvest more yeast from. So, If you never wanted to use any other strain besides WLP001 or whatever. You could live the rest of your life without buying yeast... As long as you kept washing, and kept the yeast rotated so that it stays viable. I'd imagine you'd want to use it within a year.
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Old 11-06-2008, 08:12 PM   #223
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I've only been able to find the large ball jars, not the smaller mason jars. What's the best way to modify this technique for only larger containers?

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Old 11-08-2008, 12:35 AM   #224
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I've washed a couple batches now. This technique is really cool. At first when I looked at the pictures that were shown I didn't really get it. I wondered how this constituted "washing" yeast, but when I did it it became perfectly clear. You can see the bad stuff that is separated from the good yeast and how this simple process works.

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Old 11-10-2008, 07:14 PM   #225
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OK, I read all the way through the thread and there's some contradictory information. I see some pics where the sediment fills half the jars and folks saying "that's a ton of yeast" and other folks saying the yeast is a thin layer on top of the sediment. I ended up with jars that look like the majority, with a quarter inch or so of sediment. The sediment I have is very uniform in color and there is no visible layer on the top of it.

I changed the process slightly (since I could only buy bigger jars by the dozen). I boiled up 12 pint jars. I poured the water on the primary yeast cake and collected 8 jars, leaving them about 30 minutes or so while I bottled my beer. I then transferred the cloudy fluid minus the trub to 7 jars (by reusing 3 of the first jars). The sediment settled in the fridge in <12 hours and the results look really nice. A clear "tea" of beer on top and a super-clean 1/4" layer of creamy sediment on the bottom.

Do I have yeast or clean trub?

Oh yeah, anyone have a definitive answer on how many generations is a good idea?

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Old 11-10-2008, 08:15 PM   #226
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Originally Posted by GroovePuppy View Post
I ended up with jars that look like the majority, with a quarter inch or so of sediment. The sediment I have is very uniform in color and there is no visible layer on the top of it.

I changed the process slightly (since I could only buy bigger jars by the dozen). I boiled up 12 pint jars. I poured the water on the primary yeast cake and collected 8 jars, leaving them about 30 minutes or so while I bottled my beer. I then transferred the cloudy fluid minus the trub to 7 jars (by reusing 3 of the first jars). The sediment settled in the fridge in <12 hours and the results look really nice. A clear "tea" of beer on top and a super-clean 1/4" layer of creamy sediment on the bottom.

Do I have yeast or clean trub?

Oh yeah, anyone have a definitive answer on how many generations is a good idea?
I am confused. You say pint jars. Those are the small jars. The larger jars are quart size. If you use 12 that is a lot of water (like two gallons of liquid in the fermenter!) It will rinse the yeast well but you would end up with only a quarter inch of yeast per jar. When I rinse I use a half gallon jar and then 3 pint jars. When I am done my three pint jars are half full of very clean yeast and the rest full with the clear liquid.

Aside from that sounds like you end with yeast so you are good to go there.

As far as generations go. I wonder that myself. Especially since I have a couple big belgians in primary that I want to harvest and I hear people say that big beers can exhaust yeast.
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Old 11-10-2008, 10:55 PM   #227
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Originally Posted by GroovePuppy View Post
OK, I read all the way through the thread and there's some contradictory information. I see some pics where the sediment fills half the jars and folks saying "that's a ton of yeast" and other folks saying the yeast is a thin layer on top of the sediment. I ended up with jars that look like the majority, with a quarter inch or so of sediment. The sediment I have is very uniform in color and there is no visible layer on the top of it.

I changed the process slightly (since I could only buy bigger jars by the dozen). I boiled up 12 pint jars. I poured the water on the primary yeast cake and collected 8 jars, leaving them about 30 minutes or so while I bottled my beer. I then transferred the cloudy fluid minus the trub to 7 jars (by reusing 3 of the first jars). The sediment settled in the fridge in <12 hours and the results look really nice. A clear "tea" of beer on top and a super-clean 1/4" layer of creamy sediment on the bottom.

Do I have yeast or clean trub?

Oh yeah, anyone have a definitive answer on how many generations is a good idea?
Okay. Before you wash. On the bottom of the fermenting vessel you usually find that the bottom is full of trub that settled out first. The middle layer is full of healthy yeast that flocked when the beer fermented out. and the top is mostly poorly flocking cells, dead yeast and other ****. When you wash you shake up all of this and the trub and dead **** falls to the bottom of the bucket/carboy. Then you repeat this in the second vessel. By the time you reach the third vessel most of the dead yeast and trub material will have been left in the bottom of the fermenter and the larger mason jar or whatever. So that the material you see in the bottom of these jars should be primarily composed of healthy living yeast.

If you followed this process you will have healthy yeast in your jars. There undoubtably will be some trub material sitting in there. But, washing will take most of this out.

The white labs website recommends using it for a maximum of 8 generations. But, as I've stated before. 8 generations is almost endless since you can harvest yeast from any of these generations also. I'd imagine that 8 is just kind of a safety barrier as you might start to get some wild yeasts and other random beasts living in your yeast culture.

Also, pint jars are great but I found half pints at wal-mart relatively cheap. I use those and a large mouth quart mason jar.

P.S. Welcome to the wonderful world of washing yeast and saving an anus load of money.
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Old 11-11-2008, 07:23 AM   #228
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I've only been able to find the large ball jars, not the smaller mason jars. What's the best way to modify this technique for only larger containers?
Up the size of your first container. I use a 1 gallon jug, and go from there.
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Old 11-11-2008, 01:04 PM   #229
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I've only been able to find the large ball jars, not the smaller mason jars.
Check earlier in the year when people are into canning stuff from their garden. You can find them at WalMart or the grocery store, even the Family Dollar or Dollar General type store, but they won't stock them in the fall or winter - need to check in spring and summer.
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Old 11-11-2008, 01:13 PM   #230
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Excellent thread with much information. I will save this and use it soon. Seems I always find information on the things I am most interested in only a few days after I develope the interest. This thread is such a find.

Edit: Would sealing the final container using a foodsaver, hurt or hinder the yeast? Since they will be dormaint in the refrigerator, I assume the lack of air in the jar could not hurt. Is this correct?

Salute!

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