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Old 03-25-2013, 10:52 PM   #1821
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Thanks for your input Zeg. Basically that is my thinking as well.

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Old 03-25-2013, 11:02 PM   #1822
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Another stupid question that I am sure has been answered in the last 1800+ posts.

Why do people use so much water to store the yeast?

It often seems to me that many images posted, 90% or more of the jar is water and only around 5 - 10% yeast.

What is the minimum covering needed? I have 50ml vials which I have started using and I am filling them around 85% yeast and 15% distilled water. They have measurements marked on them which makes it easy to determine volume of yeast. The great thing is they do not take over all the fridge space.

Can anyone advise if this is not a good idea?

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Old 03-26-2013, 12:20 AM   #1823
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el_caro View Post
Another stupid question that I am sure has been answered in the last 1800+ posts.

Why do people use so much water to store the yeast?

It often seems to me that many images posted, 90% or more of the jar is water and only around 5 - 10% yeast.

What is the minimum covering needed? I have 50ml vials which I have started using and I am filling them around 85% yeast and 15% distilled water. They have measurements marked on them which makes it easy to determine volume of yeast. The great thing is they do not take over all the fridge space.

Can anyone advise if this is not a good idea?
I could be wrong but I think it's to ensure there's no head space for oxygen hover over. Having said that, I filled one bottle halfway once and didn't seem to have any problems.
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Old 03-26-2013, 01:40 AM   #1824
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I don't think there's any benefit from the water itself. However, like tg123 said, you want your container full. You could decant and pour into a smaller container. The only reason I know of not to do this is that it requires additional handling and transfer.

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Old 03-26-2013, 02:09 PM   #1825
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I tried this process for the first time last week and just pitched it on Sunday. I was using Bry-97 that was originally in a dry packet. My wash sat in the fridge for approximately 8 days until I used it (No starter used. Just decanted and swirled it up a bit). Within 12 hours, the airlock was almost bouncing out of the grommet there was so much activity. I had never seen this yeast react nearly this well. It usually takes around 48 hrs to see any activity but this time it is crazy. There is so much bubbling that it's impossible to even count the time lapsed between bubbles. Now, this morning at about 54 hours, it's almost completely finished already. I will for sure continue to do this!

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Old 03-26-2013, 02:27 PM   #1826
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First time poster. Thanks everyone for this thread. I've read the first, oh, few hundred comments and then the last few hundred. I have 182 pages listed so I'm hoping I'm not asking something that was covered on page 134.

I started reading this post because I have a new, 15-gallon conical fermenter and I have never harvested yeast before. I have a bottom and side valve on my conical. I think I understand the washing aspect of it from all the posts on the thread. In the past, when I just drained off the yeast, I just threw it away (I know, don't shoot me). I would collect around a gallon of "stuff", if not more, during this dump. So I would expect that much again.

So my question is, what is the best way to get to that yeast out of my conical. My "guess", is that I collect everything out of the bottom valve after fermentation has run its course. Collect this into a sterilized 1 - 2 gallon jug or carboy. Then begin the process of separating and washing the waste from the yeast as described in this thread. If that sounds correct, my guess (again) is that I should end up with quite a bit of waste on this first collection, hence the large 1 - 2 gallon jug or carboy for the initial catch. Then eventually let it settle, decant, settle, etc till I have just the yeast in small bottles/vials.

Am I close?

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Old 03-26-2013, 05:50 PM   #1827
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Sounds like a plan to me. A gallon or two is not an absurd amount to start the rinsing with. I'd say I have typically a half gallon of yeast+trub in my 5 gallon primary, so 2-3 times that for a 15 gallon fermentor sounds about right.

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Old 03-26-2013, 09:13 PM   #1828
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjw5015 View Post
I tried this process for the first time last week and just pitched it on Sunday. I was using Bry-97 that was originally in a dry packet. My wash sat in the fridge for approximately 8 days until I used it (No starter used. Just decanted and swirled it up a bit). Within 12 hours, the airlock was almost bouncing out of the grommet there was so much activity. I had never seen this yeast react nearly this well. It usually takes around 48 hrs to see any activity but this time it is crazy. There is so much bubbling that it's impossible to even count the time lapsed between bubbles. Now, this morning at about 54 hours, it's almost completely finished already. I will for sure continue to do this!
I find second generation yeast more aggressive than the first generation dry yeast.
Do you normally rehydrate the dry yeast?
Another possible factor in the very quick liftoff may be that you pitched more viable cells. Did you do a calculation on the amount of rinsed yeast that you were pitching? It is just as easy to overpitch as underpitch. Significantly overpitching can have subtle negative effects on your beer.
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Old 03-27-2013, 11:05 AM   #1829
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Was talking to a brewclub member and this subject came up.
He asked this. If you harvested yeast and put in the fridge and couple of weeks later you pull one out to use, if it was spoiled, would you not smell it? What about tasting a bit of the beer on top of the yeast that you pour off?
I'm not sure, but it seems like if the yeast has gone bad due to contamination in the washing process you would know after it sat for a week or two.

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Old 03-27-2013, 11:59 AM   #1830
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el_caro

I find second generation yeast more aggressive than the first generation dry yeast.
Do you normally rehydrate the dry yeast?
Another possible factor in the very quick liftoff may be that you pitched more viable cells. Did you do a calculation on the amount of rinsed yeast that you were pitching? It is just as easy to overpitch as underpitch. Significantly overpitching can have subtle negative effects on your beer.
Yea I rehydrate my dry yeast. I didn't do a calculation for a cell count, but the jar I used probably had the same amount as a liquid vial would. I know this isn't an indication of number of viable cells, but everything seems to be going ok.
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