Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Yeast Washing Illustrated

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-15-2012, 03:02 PM   #1631
pabloj13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 1,553
Liked 90 Times on 78 Posts
Likes Given: 109

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TBaGZ View Post
So, does this look right?
Yeah, looks right to me. Others might have some ideas on different volumes. Boy, it really shows you how much a stir plate helps though...
__________________

Kegged Two Hearted, Dragonmead Final Absolution
Bottled Robust porter, Founder's Breakfast Stout, Ommegawd Hellepin, Ed Wort's Apfelwein
RIP Snake Dog IPA, Biermuncher's OktoberFAST, Falconer's Flight IPA, Two-Hearted clone (Culturing Bell's Yeast), Noberon wheat, Skeeter Pee using dry yeast, Smooth Oatmeal Stout


Simple and easy wort aeration - Harvest yeast from your blowoff - Homebrew Spicy Mustard
pabloj13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 03:31 PM   #1632
jwalker1140
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 491
Liked 40 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

But isn't there a difference between the 'Repitching from Slurry' tab and what this thread is about? I thought mrmalty assumed someone just pours some of the yeast cake into a jar and throws it into the fridge. At least that's what I think of when someone uses the term 'slurry.'

I always thought one of the keys to yeast washing was using water that has had much of the oxygen driven off in order to encourage the yeast to go dormant, thereby extending its viability. Assuming that's the case, wouldn't mrmalty significantly underestimate the viability of washed yeast?

I appreciate the notion that maybe it's best to just go with what mrmalty says, realizing that the results may be very conservative, but I just have to wonder if this makes sense when I look at the results from the yeastcalc.com screen shot above where it shows 5.5 bil cells need to be grown up to 219.

Is this reasonable or is comparing 'slurry' to 'washed' like comparing apples to oranges?

__________________
jwalker1140 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 03:53 PM   #1633
TBaGZ
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Estero, FL
Posts: 543
Liked 30 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 90

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pabloj13 View Post
Yeah, looks right to me. Others might have some ideas on different volumes. Boy, it really shows you how much a stir plate helps though...
Yes, this will be my last starter without one.
__________________
I want to make beer!
TBaGZ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 04:00 PM   #1634
pabloj13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 1,553
Liked 90 Times on 78 Posts
Likes Given: 109

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker1140 View Post
But isn't there a difference between the 'Repitching from Slurry' tab and what this thread is about? I thought mrmalty assumed someone just pours some of the yeast cake into a jar and throws it into the fridge. At least that's what I think of when someone uses the term 'slurry.'

I always thought one of the keys to yeast washing was using water that has had much of the oxygen driven off in order to encourage the yeast to go dormant, thereby extending its viability. Assuming that's the case, wouldn't mrmalty significantly underestimate the viability of washed yeast?

I appreciate the notion that maybe it's best to just go with what mrmalty says, realizing that the results may be very conservative, but I just have to wonder if this makes sense when I look at the results from the yeastcalc.com screen shot above where it shows 5.5 bil cells need to be grown up to 219.

Is this reasonable or is comparing 'slurry' to 'washed' like comparing apples to oranges?
I have found the Yeastcalc estimates for how much yeast I will end up with after the first starter with washed yeast to be pretty darned close, which implies that the yeast behaved the way the algorithm predicted. I guess if you look at the liquid yeast tab the viability drops more slowly than the slurry tab. It's possible it's a little too conservative.
__________________

Kegged Two Hearted, Dragonmead Final Absolution
Bottled Robust porter, Founder's Breakfast Stout, Ommegawd Hellepin, Ed Wort's Apfelwein
RIP Snake Dog IPA, Biermuncher's OktoberFAST, Falconer's Flight IPA, Two-Hearted clone (Culturing Bell's Yeast), Noberon wheat, Skeeter Pee using dry yeast, Smooth Oatmeal Stout


Simple and easy wort aeration - Harvest yeast from your blowoff - Homebrew Spicy Mustard
pabloj13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 04:55 PM   #1635
jwalker1140
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 491
Liked 40 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pabloj13 View Post
I have found the Yeastcalc estimates for how much yeast I will end up with after the first starter with washed yeast to be pretty darned close, which implies that the yeast behaved the way the algorithm predicted.
Interesting. Did you determine that by cell count or by measuring the volume of settled yeast?

I think what I would really like to see is a cell count done on washed yeast of various ages to get a better understanding of how it compares to the results from the mrmalty 'liquid yeast' and 'repitching from slurry' tabs. (Maybe I should ask Santa for a microscope and hemocytometer!) Short of that, I'm inclined to go with your approach of starting with the 'repitching' tab set to 3 and 10.
__________________
jwalker1140 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 05:57 PM   #1636
pabloj13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 1,553
Liked 90 Times on 78 Posts
Likes Given: 109

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker1140 View Post
Interesting. Did you determine that by cell count or by measuring the volume of settled yeast?

I think what I would really like to see is a cell count done on washed yeast of various ages to get a better understanding of how it compares to the results from the mrmalty 'liquid yeast' and 'repitching from slurry' tabs. (Maybe I should ask Santa for a microscope and hemocytometer!) Short of that, I'm inclined to go with your approach of starting with the 'repitching' tab set to 3 and 10.
It was just from the settled yeast. I do have many microscopes and hemacytometers. I should check some of my washed yeast.
__________________

Kegged Two Hearted, Dragonmead Final Absolution
Bottled Robust porter, Founder's Breakfast Stout, Ommegawd Hellepin, Ed Wort's Apfelwein
RIP Snake Dog IPA, Biermuncher's OktoberFAST, Falconer's Flight IPA, Two-Hearted clone (Culturing Bell's Yeast), Noberon wheat, Skeeter Pee using dry yeast, Smooth Oatmeal Stout


Simple and easy wort aeration - Harvest yeast from your blowoff - Homebrew Spicy Mustard
pabloj13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 09:32 PM   #1637
jwalker1140
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 491
Liked 40 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pabloj13 View Post
It was just from the settled yeast. I do have many microscopes and hemacytometers. I should check some of my washed yeast.
I think a study that looks at this carefully would be of tremendous value.

There's a lot of information on the viability of new yeast and of yeast slurries (the first post in the thread called 'why to not pitch on your yeast cake' has a lot of good info on this, with references), but I haven't found much on washed yeast as it's presented in this thread. It seems reasonable that the viability of washed yeast would fall somewhere in between new and slurry, but whether this is true, or whether washed tends to be more like one than the other, I have no idea.
__________________
jwalker1140 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-15-2012, 11:27 PM   #1638
TBaGZ
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Estero, FL
Posts: 543
Liked 30 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 90

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TBaGZ
Made a started with the first batch of washed yeast last night. I washed it back on 7-28, so we shall see how this goes. The first pic is after being in the fridge for a day after washing and the next was right before I made the starter.
Had some good activity showing when I got home from work tonight. Going to crash it tonight an step it up in the morning.
__________________
I want to make beer!
TBaGZ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-17-2012, 03:26 PM   #1639
shaunvfx
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 14
Likes Given: 2

Default

So, I am pretty sure something went wrong somewhere. When I threw the water in the carboy and shook it around I let it sit for 20 minutes or so. Basically it looked just like the jar in the picture just a bigger version.
Is this even useable?


Looks like all I have is trub and a tiny layer of yeast in the jar, any ideas? It seemed easy enough but obviously not. Are you guys racking off after the shake up in primary or are you pouring? I'm using a 6.5 glass carboy.

image.jpg  
__________________
shaunvfx is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-17-2012, 04:42 PM   #1640
jwalker1140
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 491
Liked 40 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

By the looks of the photo it seems like you may have brought over quite a bit of the trub. Here's what I do, and it always turns out just like the photos from the original post.

Once the beer has been racked out, I shake the carboy like mad to loosen everything before I add the water, just so I don't have to shake as much once I've added the water that has had the oxygen driven off. Once everything is loose and the clumps are gone, I add water to the carboy, shake just enough to mix well, let it sit for 10-20 minutes and then I pour the liquid on top - being very careful to not disturb the settled trub - into my 1 gal jug. I let that sit for another 10-20 minutes and then I very carefully pour the liquid on top into 2-4 pint jars.

As far as how long I let it sit, I pour to the next jar right when I start to see yeast settling. It's usually pretty obvious because you'll see a fine layer start to form that's much lighter in color than what's already settled. Hope this helps.

__________________
jwalker1140 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yeast washing vs. yeast harvesting (kraeusen skimming) Dogslovebeer General Techniques 14 05-30-2013 06:05 PM
Washing yeast, starters, pre-made wort, all kinds of yeast Q's 98EXL General Techniques 15 09-06-2011 05:55 PM
Conical to Keg Illustrated John Beere Bottling/Kegging 25 03-21-2011 07:38 PM
Decoction, An Illustrated PPT Presentation BierMuncher General Techniques 2 01-03-2008 10:30 PM
My first All-Grain...Illustrated BierMuncher All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 28 02-01-2007 05:19 PM