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Old 11-10-2009, 02:14 AM   #1
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Default Yeast starter/wort

I see all these people doing yeast starters with wort and I'm wondering where the hell they got the wort from? If I am doing all grain, I can't get the wort until after it's done boiling and ready to have the yeast pitched. Where is everyone getting this wort from (before their wort is boiled and ready to have any yeast pitched)? Do you/they save it from a previous batch? It seems very odd to me that someone would save some wort from an old batch to use as a yeast starter and seemingly have it sit in their fridge for two weeks where bacteria can get in to it. What's the deal? This has always been a mystery to me. Yes, I am a noob.

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Old 11-10-2009, 02:19 AM   #2
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Just get some dry malt extract and boil it for 15 minutes to get a decent wort. Chill down to 70 and pitch your yeast.

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Old 11-10-2009, 02:28 AM   #3
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Just get some dry malt extract and boil it for 15 minutes to get a decent wort. Chill down to 70 and pitch your yeast.
That seems like a pricey alternative to something that doesn't seem necessary at all (except for higher ABV beers). I don't plan on doing any partial mashes or extract brewing so it'd be another ingredient to buy, but I guess that answers my question about the mystery of the wort.
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Old 11-10-2009, 02:32 AM   #4
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I use DME, but you can also mash some 2-row for a 1 gallon wort (target about 1.040 or so) and then use standard canning techniques to store for future use.

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Old 11-10-2009, 02:41 AM   #5
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Every now and then, I make an extra gallon of wort when I'm brewing, and freeze it quart-size containers.

When I need a starter, I thaw and boil a wortsicle or two. No need for extract, just a bit of pre-planning.

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Old 11-10-2009, 02:47 AM   #6
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That seems like a pricey alternative to something that doesn't seem necessary at all (except for higher ABV beers).
I think yeast starters are always necessary for liquid-based strains. I want to know that my yeast is viable before pitching.
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Old 11-10-2009, 03:25 AM   #7
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Interesting. I don't really think that yeast starters are necessary, it just get the yeast ready. It's like foreplay before sex; preparation for a faster fermentation, but going straight in to it is practically the same thing. It just saves you a day of fermentation.

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Old 11-10-2009, 03:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSteel View Post
Interesting. I don't really think that yeast starters are necessary, it just get the yeast ready. It's like foreplay before sex; preparation for a faster fermentation, but going straight in to it is practically the same thing. It just saves you a day of fermentation.
And you don't want them ready? It serves to grow the sufficient amount of yeast for your fermentation. I suggest you check out http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html to see how much yeast you should be pitching.
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Old 11-10-2009, 03:39 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSteel View Post
Interesting. I don't really think that yeast starters are necessary, it just get the yeast ready. It's like foreplay before sex; preparation for a faster fermentation, but going straight in to it is practically the same thing. It just saves you a day of fermentation.
It propagates more yeast, its not really to get it active as you say.
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Old 11-10-2009, 03:56 AM   #10
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Or, you can make a wort using the method this guy uses: a 1/4 cup of homemade yeast nutrient with a 1/2 cup of white table sugar per pint of water.

Pretty interesting, I think I will make some of that nutrient with my next secondary . . .

canning starter wort

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