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Old 11-16-2013, 01:20 AM   #1
eluterio
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Default Yeast Slurry/Pitching on Yeast Cake/Washing yeast

I have two different Wyeast 1010 and 3068. I made one american wheat and the other a German wheat. My intentions were to pitch on the yeast cake with a rye/2row on the 1010 and 3068 tomorrow. Long story short I had to american into another bucket due to broken spigot that cause me to lose 1 gallon of beer or more.

1010: In reading here on HBT I saw support for pitching on yeast cakes and not to. In part of my reading someone said sorry all i know his name is BOB jut to get a ss scoop and scoop it out instead of pitching on yeast cake. Since i had a broken spigot I have no choice but to scoop this yeast out. I did so and collected everything at the bottom of the bucket, hops, trub, yeast, and beer. Its settling right now and I have total 1 qt mason jar, and 8 z mason jar full. I can see the yeast still burping but no matter im still brewing tomorrow and pitching it.

Question: I used Mr Malty and saw that for a 1.052 I need 98 ml of yeast. I saw somewhere Mr. Malty was designed for when you wash the yeast. What amount do I do for yeast slurry?

For argument sake If its 100ml I need, should I rinse the rest as like ive seen on youtube and read here and store or can I just decant the slurry and store it for long term?

I am going to still poor wort on yeast cake on the 3068 then when i keg ill harvest that.

Im sure i have more questions but i have a screaming child that i must tend to now any advice would be most appreciated.

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Old 11-16-2013, 03:50 AM   #2
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You should rinse it beofre using it. Add boiled and cooled water to your leftover yeast/trub mixture, set it in the refrigerator, let it settle for a few minutes, pour off the creamy white yeast into a new jar. Then estimate how much yeast you have in that jar after it has settled in the fridge and pitch according to mrmalty. That will be the way to pitch the right amount.

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Old 11-16-2013, 07:19 AM   #3
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I did boil up some jars of water im prepared to do this set you mentioned however, me being a new to this why couldnt I pitch 100ml of the slurry that I pulled from the yeast cake? Are the concerns the yeast has too much trub in it and would add other stuff into the new batch?

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Old 11-16-2013, 01:55 PM   #4
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You don't need to rinse it if you are going to use it relatively quickly (the next day is quickly). I've pitched the yeast cake that I stored in the fridge for a week and just accounted for some loss in viability. Worked great.

As for how much, you can use Mr Malty's calculator. Make sure to use the "repitching from slurry tab". You can change the "yeast concentration" slider. In Bob's "why not to pitch on a yeast cake" thread, he says you will have 1 billion/ml, but you can see that Mr Malty calls that a thin slurry. I assuming your's is thicker than "thin"? Mine always are. So you can move that to right. Or if you just keep the defaults, it will tell you to pitch 94 ml, so I'd probably go for that. If you're slurry is thicker, you will be overpitching, but I've heard that is better than underpitching. Good luck and let us know how it goes.

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Old 11-16-2013, 02:30 PM   #5
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Thanks mtnagel for the info this was helpful. Ill go ahead and pitch the 100ml. Should I rinse the rest and store?

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Old 11-16-2013, 02:43 PM   #6
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If you want to keep it for longer term storage (> a week or so), then yes.

Personally, I've started harvesting from starter. I think it's less work (just make a bigger starter, which you are already making anyway), you get cleaner yeast (no hops) and it doesn't really increase the generation count like a full fermentation would.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/entries/...-approach.html

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Old 11-16-2013, 03:35 PM   #7
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So im looking at my yeast and end up decanting the slurry and now have 600ml. I have a question on mr. malty how can you tell if you have a thin or thick slury. The difference between think and thin is 100ml, roughly. Ill probably pitch the 200 then rinse out the rest and store. And just to be clear im rounding up just to make it easy for my explanation. Ill probably be closer to the actual amount that Mr. Malty is asking for. Thanks

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Old 11-16-2013, 05:25 PM   #8
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This is what Jamil says about that here:

Quote:
This setting allows you to adjust for how thick a slurry you're measuring. If you've ever seen the yeast packed hard into the bottom of a White Labs vial, that is Thick Yeast at 4.5 billion cells per ml. When you harvest a yeast slurry and it has settled for a few hours, that is a thin slurry. Usually, most homebrewers will let their yeast settle for a few days in the fridge between one batch and the next. When you do, you'll notice the yeast has settled a bit and is sort of jelly-like. That is the default setting on the calculator. You'll need to estimate from there for other yeast thickness, but what is most important is keeping track of what you pitched and the results you get from the beer. If you need to adjust up or down, that is OK, just keep track of how you do things each time.

Once you've determined how much yeast you have in the container, you can shake the container along with any liquid to loosen up the yeast. If you determine there is 200 ml of yeast solids in the container and you want to pitch 100 ml. Shake the container to break up the yeast and then pour 1/2 of this very loose yeast slurry into your beer.
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Old 11-17-2013, 06:14 PM   #9
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Contrary to what you will read on this forum, rinsing yeast with boiled water is a completely unnecessary step. You can repitch 100 to 250mls of slurry directly from the crop without fear of ruining your batch.

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Old 11-17-2013, 07:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EarlyAmateurZymurgist View Post
Contrary to what you will read on this forum, rinsing yeast with boiled water is a completely unnecessary step. You can repitch 100 to 250mls of slurry directly from the crop without fear of ruining your batch.
What I've seen is that rinsing is unnecessary when you are going to reuse the yeast cake within a week or so.

Just look at MrMalty's calculator. When you use the liquid yeast tab, if you use 1 month ago, the viability is 74%. But when you use the repitching tab, the viability drops to 43%. So that's why it's recommended that for longer term storage, you'd want to rinse, but if you are going to use it quickly, rinsing isn't necessary.
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