Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > yeast pitching
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-07-2012, 03:34 AM   #11
iaefebs
Registered User
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: West Coast, MI
Posts: 2,663
Liked 242 Times on 176 Posts
Likes Given: 605

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcLight View Post
How does rehydrating bad yeast show its bad?
Does it all sink? All float?
Turn color?
The yeast didn't do anything. It stayed the same as how it looked going into the water.
__________________
iaefebs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 04:16 AM   #12
GodsStepBrother
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: , Texas
Posts: 1,263
Liked 25 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

It will not ruin your batch at all, but a lot of us on here are big sticklers when it comes to doing everything we can to make the best beer we can. I like others hear have not seen a real difference when it comes to hydrating yeast. I have tried both ways, not that big of a deal in my eyes. That being said it is such a simple step and the reasoning makes sense to me so why not.

The idea behind rehydrating in water is due to the fact that the yeast is dried in a medium that is glueing the cells together. Water will do a better job of releasing the yeast because there is no sugar in solution. When you pitch directly into the sugary wort, the median the yeast are coated in takes longer to dissolve thus holding some of the yeast captive.

Both ways work, one is 1% more work, up to you in the end.

__________________
GodsStepBrother is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 04:38 AM   #13
porterguy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: st charles, il
Posts: 155
Liked 9 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

FWIW Latest issue of Brew Your Own magazine had an article that indicated it didn't seem to make much difference rehydrating or not.

__________________

"Is that a real poncho or is that a Sears poncho?" -Frank Zappa

porterguy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 04:42 AM   #14
porterguy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: st charles, il
Posts: 155
Liked 9 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dave1776 View Post
Just wanted to be sure, some people tell me just to open and pour it in. While others swear by hydrating. There are no directions on the pack so i assume room temp water about 70 degrees is ok?
If you want to see if there is some life in the yeast, you need to put it into warm water, between about 95-110. You'll see the yeast sort of "foam up" a little, which means there's life in there.
__________________

"Is that a real poncho or is that a Sears poncho?" -Frank Zappa

porterguy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 07:39 AM   #15
samc
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 5,420
Liked 55 Times on 52 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Lots of not so accurate info on dry yeast floats around on the internet. Great info on Danstar site and for the OP, he should check out the Tips PDF

__________________
samc is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 09:15 AM   #16
ChillWill
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Posts: 856
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

You need normal water (not RO or distilled) at 95f-105f.

The hydrogen bonds in the water kind of sit in the cell walls, making them orderly after they get a bit messed up in the dehydration stage. They need to be orderly to stop the osmotic shock of sugar rushing in and destroying the cells.

Also, no need to oxygenate dry yeast if you pitch the correct amount.

__________________
ChillWill is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 12:26 PM   #17
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 7,136
Liked 853 Times on 710 Posts
Likes Given: 315

Default

I brewed 2 batches of beer two days apart with similar OG. Both were pitched with Safale US-05 dry yeast without re-hydration that had been purchased the same day. One took 36 hours to show activity while the other was percolating in 12 hours. While rehydrating may be good practice, your yeast lag time may vary more than you would think.

__________________
RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 04:59 PM   #18
jonmohno
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Corn, High Fructose Corn Fortress, IA
Posts: 5,832
Liked 411 Times on 362 Posts
Likes Given: 1210

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChillWill View Post
You need normal water (not RO or distilled) at 95f-105f.

The hydrogen bonds in the water kind of sit in the cell walls, making them orderly after they get a bit messed up in the dehydration stage. They need to be orderly to stop the osmotic shock of sugar rushing in and destroying the cells.

Also, no need to oxygenate dry yeast if you pitch the correct amount.
Doesnt it still benefit from oxygenating,with dry yeast? Or are you saying there is absoulutly no benefit to aerating,and its pointless to do it?
__________________
jonmohno is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 05:06 PM   #19
MrManifesto
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 433
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

You absolutely need to aerate your wort regardless of what kind of yeast you're using.

__________________
MrManifesto is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2012, 05:14 PM   #20
NordeastBrewer77
NBA Playa
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 7 reviews
 
NordeastBrewer77's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Posts: 7,933
Liked 1078 Times on 785 Posts
Likes Given: 3977

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrManifesto View Post
You absolutely need to aerate your wort regardless of what kind of yeast you're using.
^THIS^ there seems to be some info floating around about not needing to aerate when pitching dry yeast, i just talked about this on another thread. theoretically, the process of drying yeast gives them what they need from oxygen absorption... key word there, THEORETICALLY. if you don't aerate when using dry yeast, they will kick flavor compounds that may not be desirable in your beer.

people, PLEASE AERATE YOUR WORT. your beer will thank you for it.
__________________
The Polk Street Brewery

Brewin' 'n' Que'n - YouTube Shenanigans

Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
can i drink this? I mean. Im gunna. But is it fine?
Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
it's not a barley wine. it's an ale.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlebomber View Post
Have you seen the price of ketchup lately? And I'm not talking Heinz.
NordeastBrewer77 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What happens to yeast when pitching at 88 deg? AshevilleRob Fermentation & Yeast 30 03-17-2013 01:52 PM
Pitching a second yeast petep1980 Fermentation & Yeast 1 10-01-2011 02:52 AM
Re-Pitching yeast moneycoach Fermentation & Yeast 7 03-08-2011 08:55 PM
Over pitching dry yeast? effinpansy Fermentation & Yeast 3 02-07-2010 05:17 PM
Yeast rinsing after pitching on yeast cake? Nugent Fermentation & Yeast 1 11-22-2009 01:38 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS