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Old 02-15-2011, 07:52 AM   #1
LarsonLE
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Default Wyeast Kolsch 2565 Starter

Hey everyone, I'm about to brew up my Brewer's Best Kolsch kit that I bought, and wanted to ask a couple questions about making a starter (I made a starter my last batch but I still have some unanswered questions).

First off, I am currently using my only two growlers with the Hefeweizen I just bottled, meaning I need to think of what I am going to house the starter in. Do you think this water bottle I have would be sufficient? It is stainless steel inside, would that matter at all? Here are some pics:

http://img249.imageshack.us/img249/3743/dscn1714x.jpg
http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/6106/dscn1717a.jpg

Second, because I don't know any of my own light DME, I am going to be using some of the kit. Does this mean I shouldn't decant the yeast starter when it comes to brewing day? Is this going to affect the taste of my brew?

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Old 02-15-2011, 11:15 AM   #2
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The water bottle looks like it's quite a bit smaller than a half gallon, is that right? I'd find a jar or something else that holds around a half gallon.

Your plan to pitch the entire starter makes sense to me.

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Old 02-15-2011, 12:44 PM   #3
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I used a 2 liter plastic soda bottle for my last Kolsch starter and stuck a chunk of open cell foam in the top of it (you can also just use tin foil). A two-day starter of the Wyeast Kolsch yeast will give it a very good head start and in my experience will fully ferment an ale at 65 degrees in about four days. USE A BLOW OFF TUBE, especially with anything over 1.050! I'm sure that a one-day starter would be more than sufficient though. Keep the fermentation temperature at around 60 degrees though, my last batch (at 65 deg) has been on the fruity side but still crisp.

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Old 02-15-2011, 03:48 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappers_ View Post
The water bottle looks like it's quite a bit smaller than a half gallon, is that right? I'd find a jar or something else that holds around a half gallon.

Your plan to pitch the entire starter makes sense to me.
Yeah, it's about a quarter gallon. I will look around for an empty milk jug.
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Old 02-15-2011, 03:54 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvtschultz View Post
I used a 2 liter plastic soda bottle for my last Kolsch starter and stuck a chunk of open cell foam in the top of it (you can also just use tin foil). A two-day starter of the Wyeast Kolsch yeast will give it a very good head start and in my experience will fully ferment an ale at 65 degrees in about four days. USE A BLOW OFF TUBE, especially with anything over 1.050! I'm sure that a one-day starter would be more than sufficient though. Keep the fermentation temperature at around 60 degrees though, my last batch (at 65 deg) has been on the fruity side but still crisp.
I will definitely be sure to use a blow off, and to keep the temps low. Thanks!
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Old 02-15-2011, 04:04 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvtschultz View Post
I used a 2 liter plastic soda bottle for my last Kolsch starter and stuck a chunk of open cell foam in the top of it (you can also just use tin foil). A two-day starter of the Wyeast Kolsch yeast will give it a very good head start and in my experience will fully ferment an ale at 65 degrees in about four days. USE A BLOW OFF TUBE, especially with anything over 1.050! I'm sure that a one-day starter would be more than sufficient though. Keep the fermentation temperature at around 60 degrees though, my last batch (at 65 deg) has been on the fruity side but still crisp.
you get much better and cleaner results fermenting 2565 @ 60F and it usually takes 3-4 weeks to fully ferment, last few points take forever.
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Old 02-15-2011, 05:52 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by paraordnance View Post
you get much better and cleaner results fermenting 2565 @ 60F and it usually takes 3-4 weeks to fully ferment, last few points take forever.
Just curious, would you recommend putting a Kolsch in secondary? I would think so, since Kolsch beers are known for their clarity. If you do recommended this, how long after 3-4 weeks in the primary should I allow it to sit in secondary?
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Old 02-15-2011, 07:08 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by paraordnance View Post
you get much better and cleaner results fermenting 2565 @ 60F and it usually takes 3-4 weeks to fully ferment, last few points take forever.
I've read that performing initial fermentation at 60 deg for the majority and then bumping up the temp to 65-68 helps to wrap up fermentation. I've had complete fermentation in 4-5 days both times that I've used the yeast at 65 deg ambient but with a more assertive fruitiness in the nose and up front.

Cold bottle conditioning for a week or two goes a long way in brightening the beer. I used whirlfloc at the end of the boil and then a week in the fridge at 34-36 deg and can pour a crystal clear glass with care.
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Old 02-15-2011, 07:10 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by LarsonLE View Post
Just curious, would you recommend putting a Kolsch in secondary? I would think so, since Kolsch beers are known for their clarity. If you do recommended this, how long after 3-4 weeks in the primary should I allow it to sit in secondary?
I have one sitting in secondary for a week right now, after 3 weeks primary fermentation. The main reason is I wash and re-use my 2565 for generations and I wanted only most flocculant yeast in my yeast bank. I noticed that after several wash/reuse cycles its getting harder and longer to get clear Kolsch beer. Kolsch is one of these beers where you almost have to use secondary if you want clear beer. It ists in a freezer for a week and it just started to clear up on top, I can see yeast suspended.
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Old 02-16-2011, 07:04 PM   #10
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So tonight I will begin my starter so that I can brew tomorrow. I had a couple questions. I was wondering when I go to put tin foil over the opening of my milk jug, should I put some tiny holes in the foil? Would it also be a good idea to cover the tin foil with a sanitized plastic bag?

Since I don't have my growler I'm a little unsure of what to do since on my last and only starter I was able to just put an airlock on that baby, which was very convenient.

Anymore comments on whether or not to decant?

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