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Old 02-07-2010, 09:59 PM   #1
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Default Wyeast equivalent to Danstar Nottingham?

Just curious what a good Wyeast equivalent to Danstar Nottingham there is. Any suggestions?

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Old 02-07-2010, 10:04 PM   #2
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I use Nottingham for everything, ales, stouts, even pseudo lagers. It's a very neutral low ester production, fast yeast. 1056 is going to be the Wyeast "do all" neutral ale yeast for 4 times the price.

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Old 02-07-2010, 11:57 PM   #3
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Old 02-08-2010, 12:00 AM   #4
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london ale?

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Rich with a dry finish, minerally profile, bold and crisp, with some fruitiness. Often used for higher gravity ales and when a high level of attenuation is desired for the style.
sounds pretty similar to me.
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Old 02-08-2010, 12:21 AM   #5
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I don't think 1028 (London Ale) is very similar to Nottingham. Yes, it finishes dry, and compared with most British yeasts has very little fruitiness, but it has oodles of character that isn't present in Nottingham.
I think (like faststage1 said) that 1056 is the closest I've tried (but there are many I haven't tried). They both ferment very cleanly, producing a beer where the yeast doesn't contribute any special flavors to the final brew.

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Old 02-08-2010, 12:33 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf View Post
I don't think 1028 (London Ale) is very similar to Nottingham. Yes, it finishes dry, and compared with most British yeasts has very little fruitiness, but it has oodles of character that isn't present in Nottingham.
I think (like faststage1 said) that 1056 is the closest I've tried (but there are many I haven't tried). They both ferment very cleanly, producing a beer where the yeast doesn't contribute any special flavors to the final brew.

-a.
I should admit, i've never brewed with the London ale yeast. I'll believe ajf before the wyeast quip anyday.
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Old 02-08-2010, 01:04 AM   #7
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OK, so maybe I should try the Nottingham, but a few questions first. I've never used a dry yeast, so I have to work outside my comfort zone. I've heard some people say you don't need a starter with dry yeast. Is this true? I've also never made a starter and was planning on it for my next brew. What's the process for making a starter with dry yeast? Do you need to rehydrate before pitching into your starter? What is the rehydration process for dry yeast? Sorry for being so ignorant...just trying to take my brewing to the next level, so I'll be doing several things that I've never done before. Partial mash, starter, and possibly dry yeast!!

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Old 02-08-2010, 02:42 AM   #8
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don't do a starter for dry yeast. i would recommend rehydrating it prior to use (others will say just dump it in, which seems to work too), but rehydrating will maximize the cell count. nottingham is a champ, definitely try it.

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Old 02-08-2010, 02:44 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fotomatt1 View Post
What is the rehydration process for dry yeast?
I use a single sachet up to gravities of 1.050. Works best if you follow the rehydration process.
http://www.danstaryeast.com/tds/nottingham.pdf
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Old 02-08-2010, 03:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fotomatt1 View Post
Just curious what a good Wyeast equivalent to Danstar Nottingham there is. Any suggestions?
IMO 1028 London Ale is about as close as you are going to get to Nottingham. They are both British strains with high levels of attenuation. If you sub one for the other you will be fine. In Brewing Classic Styles Jamil lists Nottingham as the dry substitute for Wyeast 1028
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