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Old 06-11-2013, 02:16 PM   #201
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Quote:
Originally Posted by makisupa
Chill your saison to 85 degrees
Ferment at 92 degrees for three weeks
Age at 55 degrees for two weeks
Carbonate
DONE!
This is the advice to take with this yeast. It's Dupont's yeast! You can't *****foot around with it. Pitch hot, ferment hotter. It's not going to bite. But, it's the only way to get those crazy flavors.

That, or just finish it off with 3711 once you stall.
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Old 06-28-2013, 01:31 PM   #202
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06/28 update:
Brewed two separate 5 gallon recipes on 06/09 less than three weeks ago. Created a single 2L starter and split it between my two batches.
Pitched at 85 and placed in 85 degree fermentation chamber.
4 days later increased temp to 90 in chamber.
Less than three weeks later both batches are below 1.010.
I am going to let them drop a little more then keg and cold crash when space in my keezer frees up. They can condition there while they carb up.

Just wanted to share my success story, the only time I agitated the wort was when I dropped sugar water in one of the car boys a couple of days into fermentation

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Old 07-03-2013, 10:08 PM   #203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PricePeeler
06/28 update:
Brewed two separate 5 gallon recipes on 06/09 less than three weeks ago. Created a single 2L starter and split it between my two batches.
Pitched at 85 and placed in 85 degree fermentation chamber.
4 days later increased temp to 90 in chamber.
Less than three weeks later both batches are below 1.010.
I am going to let them drop a little more then keg and cold crash when space in my keezer frees up. They can condition there while they carb up.

Just wanted to share my success story, the only time I agitated the wort was when I dropped sugar water in one of the car boys a couple of days into fermentation
7/3 update:
Both batches are below 1.005.!
Will be cold crashing batches in fermenter until I have room in the keezer. I have some friends coming over to empty a couple of kegs for me.
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Old 07-04-2013, 04:10 PM   #204
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Is anyone opposed to rousing this yeast, or do most find that it only helps? I've seen it mentioned a few times. To me though, I can't stop thinking about the oxigenation taking place when you swirl the carboy. I'm 27 days into fermentation, and I'm debating back and forth with myself: to rouse, or not to rouse.

I pitched at 88* into 1.063 wort. I had a krausen quickly, and raised it 1 degree per day to 92*, and it's been there since. I took my first reading at day 17, it read about 1.019, past the hump. At day 23 it was about 1.016. Two days after that, it reads a notch lower in brix, but SG adjustments still put it at 1.016.

There is airlock activity about every 24 seconds at the moment. I feel the urge to rouse the yeast, but then I feel like that might just be impatience rearing its ugly head. If its creeping along, is it better to just let it do its own thing?

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Old 07-04-2013, 04:15 PM   #205
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Definitely rouse. I attach my co2 hose to a sanitized racking cane to push co2 to the bottom of the carboy. This is more effective than swirling and it pushes any o2 out of the carboy since you are bubbling co2 up from the bottom.

co2 rousing and high temp, 85-90 was what worked for me.

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Old 07-04-2013, 04:24 PM   #206
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Indeed. 1 bubble/24s is not bad. It'll continue to drop. Co2 rouse is a good one. Rotating the carboy back and forth won't oxygenate the wort as the only air in the carboy is co2 and you won't be sloshing it around.

If it stalls, just add 3711 and ta-da!

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Old 07-04-2013, 04:30 PM   #207
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ne0t0ky0 View Post
Definitely rouse. I attach my co2 hose to a sanitized racking cane to push co2 to the bottom of the carboy. This is more effective than swirling and it pushes any o2 out of the carboy since you are bubbling co2 up from the bottom.

co2 rousing and high temp, 85-90 was what worked for me.
That's a great idea, does the job, but without aerating. Unfortunately, I don't have CO2. The only options for me, that I can think of, are A) swirl the carboy, or B) sanitize something like my racking cane and stir the cake up. A seems like it would do the best job getting the yeast into suspension, but at the expense of aeration. For that reason I like B better, but I don't expect that it will be exceedingly effective.
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Old 07-27-2013, 04:54 AM   #208
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Man, this yeast is self-righteous. It’s like a self-absorbed date. She’s gonna make you wait for her while she gets ready, doesn’t care if you have reservations.

I’m 49 days after pitching, and it’s still eking along. I’ve been taking periodic refractometer readings along the way. At day 17, I approximated almost 75% attenuation. I went from 1.063 to 1.016. After that, it’s just been crawling, but still attenuating. At day 33, I was at about 81% attenuation, 82% at day 44, 84% at day 47. The airlock keeps slow steady activity, a burp about every 30-45 seconds, and every time I check the gravity, it’s dropped, but just by a hair at a time.

As much as I’d like to bottle this, I know it’s against my better judgment to bottle without steady gravity readings. By now it looks like I’m going to be at least 60 days on primary! Nonetheless, I have to say it’s worth it. Every test I’ve taken has tasted amazing. It has a smooth fruit and mellow hoppy flavor up front, balanced with a crisp, dry spice in the back. Wyeast says that it will have a mildly acidic finish that benefits from elevated fermentation temperatures. In the later samples that I’ve taken, a very pleasing acidic finish has developed which is getting more prominent as it continues to dry out.

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Old 07-30-2013, 03:06 AM   #209
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If you see any signs of activity, why mess with it. Let the yeast do their thing and keep the temp at 90ish.
After reading everyone's experiences, not sure how I got lucky enough to have mine finish in 4 weeks undisturbed. I pitched 1 liter, started at 85 F, and ramped up to 90.

Thoughts? Let's get to the bottom of this !!!

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Old 08-26-2013, 11:00 PM   #210
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My second batch on 3724. I used the yeast left from my first batch. 1.050 to 1.005 in 15 days, which is not bad. Temp ranged from 68F to 78F so far. First 72 hours were at 68F.

I will let the temp rise a little bit, probably wait 7 days more at 80-85F and dry hop for 7 more days at 68F again. Then I will cold crash for 3 days.

Cheers everyone!

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