Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Wyeast 1882-PC Thames Valley II
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-12-2010, 03:03 PM   #31
Nugent
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 692
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

Update on my best bitter and this yeast.

I really like this yeast. While I wouldn't use it on all of my British beers, it would certainly be in rotation with 1968 and 1275. I like the hint of fruitiness that really shines through; I can see how this would be great with a porter. Yep, flocced out beautifully and attenuated really well - went from 1.044 to 1.011 after 10 days in primary and a week in secondary being dry-hopped.

I washed it three times and have three half pint jars with a nice, thick, white layer in the fridge.

__________________
Nugent is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2010, 03:28 PM   #32
motobrewer
I'm no atheist scientist, but...
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Thiensville, Wisconsin
Posts: 6,840
Liked 232 Times on 202 Posts
Likes Given: 379

Default

hm, i might have to try a stronger porter with c120 and this yeast.

__________________
motobrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2010, 03:41 PM   #33
AnOldUR
fer-men-TAY-shuhn
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
AnOldUR's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 6,266
Liked 604 Times on 436 Posts
Likes Given: 455

Default

Like a couple of others, I made a mild to get this yeast started, but now I’m trying to figure what to do next. So far in this thread there’s mention of: Mild, Porter, Old Ale, Pale Ale, Dark Mild, RIS, ESB, Best Bitter and Strong Porter.

Nugent’s Best Bitter looks tasty, and with the warmer weather coming, it would make a good seasonal transition beer. But he also mentioned a Pale Ale with Fuggles and Cascade, a combination that could work well for a springtime brew.

Have to weigh that against the “plan ahead” guy looking over my shoulder saying that KingBrianI’s idea for a RIS would be excellent planning for next fall/winter. Even a porter would age well.

There are just too many possibilities. Every time I make a decision, someone comes up with an idea that sounds irresistible. I’m so confused.

__________________
. . . once and a while I'll spout some jaded jackassery. — Billy-Klubb
AnOldUR is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2010, 04:05 PM   #34
motobrewer
I'm no atheist scientist, but...
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Thiensville, Wisconsin
Posts: 6,840
Liked 232 Times on 202 Posts
Likes Given: 379

Default

yeah I battle with that every time I plan my next brew. right now it's going to be an IPA.

but i really wanna brew a kolsch soon to be ready by may-june.

i'd also like to brew a light vienna style for summer.

i'd also like to brew an Oktoberfest soon for a nice 6mo lager.

i'm also almost out of porter, and this ESB isn't gonna last long and it's tasty.....

decisions, decisions....

__________________
motobrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2010, 04:15 PM   #35
KingBrianI
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 3,489
Liked 80 Times on 57 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnOldUR View Post
Like a couple of others, I made a mild to get this yeast started, but now I’m trying to figure what to do next. So far in this thread there’s mention of: Mild, Porter, Old Ale, Pale Ale, Dark Mild, RIS, ESB, Best Bitter and Strong Porter.

Nugent’s Best Bitter looks tasty, and with the warmer weather coming, it would make a good seasonal transition beer. But he also mentioned a Pale Ale with Fuggles and Cascade, a combination that could work well for a springtime brew.

Have to weigh that against the “plan ahead” guy looking over my shoulder saying that KingBrianI’s idea for a RIS would be excellent planning for next fall/winter. Even a porter would age well.

There are just too many possibilities. Every time I make a decision, someone comes up with an idea that sounds irresistible. I’m so confused.
The fuggles and cascade pale ale actually sounds really good. Have you ever tried shipyard's IPA? It's all fuggles I believe and uses ringwood yeast. Anyway, the flavorful yeast and the fuggles really play nicely together, and I think this yeast, with it's subtle fruitiness would work in a fuggles pale ale really well.
__________________

I'm too lazy and have too many beers going to keep updating this!

KingBrianI is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2010, 04:47 PM   #36
AnOldUR
fer-men-TAY-shuhn
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
AnOldUR's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 6,266
Liked 604 Times on 436 Posts
Likes Given: 455

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KingBrianI View Post
The fuggles and cascade pale ale actually sounds really good. . . . this yeast, with it's subtle fruitiness would work in a fuggles pale ale really well.
You know, I think you've convinced me which direction to go. Wondering where this would fall in BJCP land. There's an overlap in the guidelines between a Best Bitter and an APA. The yeast would push it in the English Pale Ale direction, but the Cascade would give it some American character. A loose plan would be Maris Otter as a base grain, 1.045-1.050 OG, 35-40 IBU's, Cascade for bittering / flavor and Fuggles for flavor / aroma. Just out of curiosity, where do you think this would land in terms of style?
__________________
. . . once and a while I'll spout some jaded jackassery. — Billy-Klubb
AnOldUR is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2010, 04:54 PM   #37
KingBrianI
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 3,489
Liked 80 Times on 57 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnOldUR View Post
You know, I think you've convinced me which direction to go. Wondering where this would fall in BJCP land. There's an overlap in the guidelines between a Best Bitter and an APA. The yeast would push it in the English Pale Ale direction, but the Cascade would give it some American character. A loose plan would be Maris Otter as a base grain, 1.045-1.050 OG, 35-40 IBU's, Cascade for bittering / flavor and Fuggles for flavor / aroma. Just out of curiosity, where do you think this would land in terms of style?
I would gravitate towards calling it an English Pale Ale (8C). The american hops are allowed in the style and I think the malt flavor from the maris otter and flavorful yeast would take it a bit out of style for an APA.
__________________

I'm too lazy and have too many beers going to keep updating this!

KingBrianI is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-13-2010, 01:23 PM   #38
AnOldUR
fer-men-TAY-shuhn
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
AnOldUR's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 6,266
Liked 604 Times on 436 Posts
Likes Given: 455

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mgo737 View Post
Anyone have any tips? Damn near impossible to differentiate WLP002 yeast chunks from trub...
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf View Post
Follow the above mentioned thread Yeast Washing Illustrated , but only wait 5 minutes instead of 20. That's what I do, and it works well. -a.
Love the search feature. Dug these posts up while trying to wash my Wyeast 1882-PC and having the same problem. Looking for some conformation that it's the yeast and not something that I may have done wrong. Anyone mind sharing their experience washing this stuff?
__________________
. . . once and a while I'll spout some jaded jackassery. — Billy-Klubb
AnOldUR is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-13-2010, 03:32 PM   #39
Nugent
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 692
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

It's chunky like 1968. I threw a gallon of sterilized water (boiled for 20 mins. and cooled) into my FV and gave it a really good swirl. It eventually started breaking up. There was a lot of material collected at the bottom of the jug that I decanted into after 10 mins, but lots in suspension as well. Decanted the suspended material, gave the jug a shake and repeated.

As mentioned before, after three washings (the yeast is currently sitting under sterilized water only) I managed to get three half pint jars with about 3/8" of creamy, white yeast. The additional washings got the darker, presumably dead yeast out of it, as for as I can tell.

According to Jamil's Yeast Calculator, I would need about 5 tbsps of thick slurry to have enough cells to pitch directly, based on the ever dropping viability. Won't have enough with what I have, so I'll make a big ol' starter to get it going again. Will repeat the same process again after the next brew. Jamil, as well as the brewer that I brewed with at Granville Island Brewing (Vancouver, Canada), that later generations do a better job and make the beer taste better. I guess I'll find out.

Anyway, hope this helps.

__________________

Nugent is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-13-2010, 05:00 PM   #40
AnOldUR
fer-men-TAY-shuhn
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
AnOldUR's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 6,266
Liked 604 Times on 436 Posts
Likes Given: 455

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nugent View Post
As mentioned before, after three washings (the yeast is currently sitting under sterilized water only) I managed to get three half pint jars with about 3/8" of creamy, white yeast. The additional washings got the darker, presumably dead yeast out of it, as for as I can tell. . . Anyway, hope this help.
I must have skimmed over your “three washing” post, but that's a interesting coincidence. It also took me three washings before I was happy with the results. Ended up with about 6 fluid ounces of clean yeast.


The picture below is what remained after the final wash. I added more water to it just to see how it would settle out. The new liquid is on top, a thin layer of yeast and a lot of trub at the bottom. What I have in the refrigerator is all like that thin layer. The volume and make-up of the bottom layer has me baffled. I don’t get it when using the exact same technique with other yeasts. Why do these British strains produce this stuff and what is it?
thames-valley-ii-yeast.jpg  
__________________
. . . once and a while I'll spout some jaded jackassery. — Billy-Klubb
AnOldUR is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wyeast Thames Valley Ale 1275 USM_Eagle Recipes/Ingredients 7 04-03-2011 05:27 PM
Wyeast Thames Valley / Manny's Clone Jknapp Fermentation & Yeast 1 08-20-2009 06:04 PM
Anyone used Wyeast 1275 Thames Valley Ale? FlyGuy Recipes/Ingredients 5 08-15-2007 11:40 AM
Greetings from the Valley of the Sun! skabone Introductions 8 04-26-2007 05:40 PM
Wyeast 1275 Thames Valley mysterio Recipes/Ingredients 2 01-27-2007 06:12 PM