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Old 04-24-2012, 12:09 PM   #11
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I under pitched with 1762 once and it gave me the alcohol heat you're describing.

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Old 04-24-2012, 12:24 PM   #12
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I've never had much luck making a pants dropping awesome beer with 1762, decent, but nothing like I can get from 3787.
I am not fond of 1762 either. I much prefer 3787 or 1214.

1762 can produce fusels very easily if the temps get up. Ask me how I know.

I think that learning how to ferment Belgian strains is really a big part of making good beer. There is this misconception that you can ferment them hot. You can ferment hot , but not in the first few days. I find that you need to start them low (pitch in the mid 60's) and then hold them there for a few days, then you can ramp up the temps to get them to finish low. This (for me ) gives the results that I like.
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Old 04-24-2012, 12:40 PM   #13
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I am not fond of 1762 either. I much prefer 3787 or 1214.

1762 can produce fusels very easily if the temps get up. Ask me how I know.

I think that learning how to ferment Belgian strains is really a big part of making good beer. There is this misconception that you can ferment them hot. You can ferment hot , but not in the first few days. I find that you need to start them low (pitch in the mid 60's) and then hold them there for a few days, then you can ramp up the temps to get them to finish low. This (for me) gives the results that I like.
This is exactly how I feel about 1762 and Belgians.

I only use 1762 for low gravity Belgian Blondes or similar, otherwise it takes months for the fusels to go away.
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Old 04-24-2012, 04:18 PM   #14
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All that info confirms my experience. I had no problem with WLP500, T-58, WLP575, and the 575 washed(only belgian yeasts I've used). I have to say 1762 is the problem. AmandaK, how long did the fusels's stick around in your brews w/ 1762? It's been 4 months for me now and no mellowing yet.

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Old 05-01-2012, 02:16 AM   #15
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same issues here...with the number 8 and other belgian dark beers i have fermented with 1762. i recently did a tres fem clone from more beer with 1762 and fermented at 63 ambient for 5 days before raising the temps-i get fusel off the hydrometer sample at 1.011, 10 days in, but I hope it's because it's green. i just did a belgian dark ale..1.077.. with 1762, yeah, I know, glutton for punishment and I pitched at 68 ad immediately dropped it to 63 ambient when i saw activity...it;s going crazy now at ambient 63, but now i am also nervous as it appears I needed much lower ambient...hopefully not the case, but this yeast is frustrating to say the least....i may drop it to 60, but I worry on the other end about stalling out...

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Old 05-01-2012, 02:41 AM   #16
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Per Jamil's advice in BCS, I aimed for a start of 68 and slowly ramped up to 72 over a few days for my Belgian Dark Strong. I have a small "fermentation chamber" (light bulb heater in cardboard box w/ temp controller) that I used after the first few days. I pitched the yeast at about 65, by the next morning it was at 68 and it held there for a couple days before I needed to turn on the heater.

This was in a glass carboy placed in an empty plastic tub placed in a 55 degree closet. So some insulation, but not a lot.

My point is, ff your ambient was 68 your beer was probably 75-80 degrees.
This is what I did when I made it about 18 months ago. Unfortunately I don't have good temp control so I waited until I got a good weather forecast to brew. After 3-4 months it was very drinkable. I still have a few bottles kicking around which have held up pretty nicely.
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Old 02-23-2013, 04:16 AM   #17
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Crap. I should have read this thread before I began my starter today for brewing tomorrow. I'm doing a 1.100 Barleywine tomorrow. I am pitching about 30 billion more cells than what Beersmith is calling for. Could that help reduce fusels maybe? I am beginning to wish maybe I had gone with the Scottish Ale yeast instead.

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Old 02-23-2013, 03:04 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by PhelanKA7 View Post
Crap. I should have read this thread before I began my starter today for brewing tomorrow. I'm doing a 1.100 Barleywine tomorrow. I am pitching about 30 billion more cells than what Beersmith is calling for. Could that help reduce fusels maybe? I am beginning to wish maybe I had gone with the Scottish Ale yeast instead.

Keep the temp at the low end of the range for the first several days. 1762 will throw fusels if it gets too hot too fast. The key with this yeast is to control the temp for the early part of the fermentation. It is more sensitive to high temp too soon, than some of the other Belgian yeasts.


Cool the wort to 63-64 degrees and then keep it in the mid 60's. after 3-4 days you can ramp it up to help it finish. With a beer that big the yeastis going to want to take off and create a lot of heat.

I just did a 1.097 Belgian quad and the gravity sample tastes great.
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Old 02-24-2013, 01:35 AM   #19
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And now to add insult to injury a krausen is steadily climbing its way through the blowoff so I will probably have considerably less yeast than I need for the fermentation. I think I'm gonna wait until the malarky stops and pitch the Scottish Ale yeast in a few days if it looks like things have ground to a halt...

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Old 02-24-2013, 05:17 PM   #20
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You can also reserve half of your wort in the kettle. Fill the carboy with half, toss in your yeast, and when it reaches high krausen, add the remaining half of the wort. I've done this before and it works just fine. The starter and the wort become the beer that becomes the starter for the beer. It's like a hall of mirrors.

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