Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Wy 1318 Popped a Second Krausen?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-23-2011, 11:57 AM   #11
zgoda
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: , Poland
Posts: 142
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

I think nothing bad happened, yeast just resumed stalled fermentation. Perhaps hops falling to the bottom roused yeast into suspension again. In my case it was sufficient to move carboy from one corner to another in the basement to resume fermentation. With 1318 of course.

__________________

Nobody expects Spanish infection!

zgoda is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2011, 03:32 PM   #12
jfr1111
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Quebec, Quebec
Posts: 1,549
Liked 56 Times on 49 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbx View Post
I'm a first time user of this strain and I've got a second krausen on 1.037 bitter. At 9 days after pitching it was at 1.010 (predicted terminal gravity), the airlock had been essentially still for at least 4 days (one bubble in every 5 minutes) so I added the dry hops. 3 days later there is a second krausen, the airlock is bubbling every 3 seconds, there is hop bits and trub rising and sinking and the gravity was down to 1.008. Mash went fine, ferment temp has been a stable 21C. Is this how this yeast acts? Did i pick something up from the dry hops?
This is behavious is normal as far as British yeast strains go. Most of them are very flocculant and the yeast tend to either sink to the bottom in huge clumps or chill on the surface of the beer (1318, 1469, 1968, 1187 and other true top croppers exacerbate this behaviour).

I'd recommend fermenting in buckets if possible and rousing the yeast by "folding" the krausen with a spoon a few times in the first days of fermentation. What probably happened is the yeast flocced out before eating the last two points and that dry hoping roused them back into shape, hence the gravity drop. 1318 is a very docile and superb yeast strain but it needs a bit of rousing in my experience to get full attenuation. You can bottle as soon as gravity is stable and you feel the beer is ready, even if there is still a yeast mat on top. Top croppers will form a thick crust on top after 10 days or so that will pretty much never fall down in the beer. You just rack beneath it or throw it away come bottling time.

1.008 for an ordinary bitter is just about perfect I reckon. Expect fruity if your beer fermented at 21C for the whole way though, but fruity has its place in a good bitter !
__________________
jfr1111 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2011, 08:35 PM   #13
gbx
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 637
Liked 76 Times on 61 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Thanks for the info. The gravity sample before the dry hops was great and not too fruity at all (my wife even thought it was good and she always thinks warm, flat gravity samples are disgusting). I considered bottling it then and skipping the dry hopping. I'm kinda bummed out that its taking so long to finish- I brewed a low gravity beer in hopes of a quick turn around as my supply was running out.

__________________
gbx is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-23-2011, 10:42 PM   #14
jfr1111
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Quebec, Quebec
Posts: 1,549
Liked 56 Times on 49 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbx View Post
Thanks for the info. The gravity sample before the dry hops was great and not too fruity at all (my wife even thought it was good and she always thinks warm, flat gravity samples are disgusting). I considered bottling it then and skipping the dry hopping. I'm kinda bummed out that its taking so long to finish- I brewed a low gravity beer in hopes of a quick turn around as my supply was running out.
Yeast strains with high flocculation properties are double edged swords: they tend to clear very fast, leaving you with bright beer in no time, but can also have trouble reaching proper attenuation, hence possibly longer ferments. But this need not be to be the case. With a good pitch of healthy yeast, rousing and temperature control, strains such as 1318 or 1968 can help you go from grain to glass in a very, very short time. Especially if you brew a simple low-gravity ale that doesn't need some of its "qualities" to be aged out.
__________________
jfr1111 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1318 stopped fermenting. give it another chance? piteko Fermentation & Yeast 7 04-15-2011 12:05 PM
Wyeast 1318 in bitters: too sweet... jfr1111 Fermentation & Yeast 4 04-04-2011 09:29 PM
Popped my Wyeast pouch Wallybrewer Fermentation & Yeast 1 01-09-2011 02:51 PM
possible contamination? air-lock cap popped off FSUBrewer06 Fermentation & Yeast 4 11-16-2010 03:12 PM
Popped a hole in Wyeast Pack Willy Boner Fermentation & Yeast 2 04-25-2010 07:03 PM