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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Wlp006 Bedford British review
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Old 10-07-2012, 08:55 PM   #11
Nablis
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Using this yeast again. Repitched slurry that was 3 weeks old. Mr.malty called for 200ml, I wanted to try overpitching with this yeast so pitched 300ml.
Pitched at 66 right after siphoning noisily for aeration.
12 hours later had krausen. 3 days later krausen dropped but beer is not clear.
6 days later is down to 1.020 from 1.075 but still cloudy, yeast in suspension. This yeast seems dusty and takes awhile to finish out.

Also top cropped all the foam four times to a starter and pitched that in a second beer and it took off in 12 hours. The foam would keep returning after about an hour.

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Old 10-20-2012, 05:29 AM   #12
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So I brewed a 5gal batch of a 1.040 bitter 2 weeks ago tomorrow. I did a 2L starter, chilled to 17C and fermented it in an 18C basement. Last weekend I took a gravity sample and it was at 1.013 but the airlock was still bubbling. The airlock hasn't moved much since Wednesday so tonight I took another sample and it seems to be stuck at 1.013. Should I rouse it? or warm it up? both? Its definitely too sweet and thick for a session beer right now but I don't want it to dry out too much or lose all its awesome maltiness like 1968 does if you give it a warm diacetyl rest or bottle condition. It isn't clear and there seems to be still lots of yeast in suspension so I doubt rousing will do too much.

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Old 10-20-2012, 05:59 AM   #13
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my experience has been that once the krausen drops or it slows down it doesn't drop alot of points after that.

I don't think rousing it will do anything, for me this yeast didn't get real dry, after 2 weeks I think it is done.

I am thinking of adding a lager yeast to my IPA i used this yeast in, it finished at 1.020. You could always add another yeast to dry it out if you think it needs it.

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Old 10-21-2012, 06:10 AM   #14
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...hmm...I roused and brought it upstairs into a warmer closet and we'll see. I'll probably keg it mid week if nothing is happening. This one is ok to leave on the yeast? I know everyone is hardline "primary only, yeast bite is a myth" these days but some of the british yeasts do go bad....1318 is one that does some weird things if you leave the cake in contact with the beer too long. I said this before but I think I'm done with seasonal yeasts. Unless this beer is the greatest thing I have ever tasted its not worth the hassle. I like yeast that attenuate and can be repitched successfully.

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Old 10-21-2012, 06:01 PM   #15
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A final gravity of 1.013 doesn't seem too out of whack for this yeast. It is a tad high considering the starting gravity, but much of that could be due to your mash process. I don't know where people get the impression this yeast is an under-attenuator, because it is certainly not... especially compared to some of the other characterful British yeasts. In my experience, this yeast consistently drops to 1.008-12 and flocculates out a few days later. Whitelabs lists 72-80% attenuation and that is fairly accurate.

As for re-pitching, reusing any 3 week old slurry without a starter is not the best idea. There are certainly more user-friendly yeasts out there, but as with most English ones, they require a bit more attention if you want to get the most out of them.

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Old 10-21-2012, 07:16 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bierhaus15 View Post

As for re-pitching, reusing any 3 week old slurry without a starter is not the best idea. There are certainly more user-friendly yeasts out there, but as with most English ones, they require a bit more attention if you want to get the most out of them.
Yeah, that is just my experience. 1.075 to 1.020 is 73% ADF
I would have to change my mash temperatures to get this to finish 1.008 to 1.012 like u say and of course grain bill makes a difference.

The first beer I used this in I pitched a vile into 2.5 gallons and it got down to 1.014 on 7/15. Then I did a starter with this saved yeast on 9/4 and pitched to a beer that finished at 1.020, so I guess it was the repitching for me.

EDIT: I would not call it an under attenuator but I would not call it a dry yeast either. wlp001 is 72-80% and it tends to get drier than this yeast.
I do like this yeast.
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Old 10-22-2012, 07:29 AM   #17
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..alright....I was brewing today and realized that the carboy I had planned on using was cracked so I had no choice but to keg up the bitter. Still 1.013 but it was clearer and tasted pretty good so I decided to repitch the yeast into todays batch. No time for a starter so I repitched the about 50% more slurry than Mr Malty was suggesting. We'll see how well the 3hour old slurry attenuates The beer is a 1.060 porter....not the ideal beer for the yeast but I'm going to be adding bret C in secondary...if it doesn't attenuate it isn't the end of the world.

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Old 10-23-2012, 05:27 AM   #18
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I've used this yeast for 4 beers now:
Bitter: 1.040-1.012; 70% app. atten; mash 157 - White Labs vial with ~1L starter 18hrs
Northern Brown: 1.052-1.012; 77% atten; mash 153 - repitch from Bitter slurry (7 days old)
ESB: 1.059-1.015; 74.5% atten; mash 154 - repitch from Northern Brown slurry (1 day old)
Eng. IPA: 1.061-?? - ; mash 154 - 2nd repitch from N. Brown slurry (7 days old)
all were fermented at 65-66 for 14 days; the slurrys were measured with a grad. cylinder according to the slurry part of Mr. Malty's calculator set to thin slurry and maximum non-yeast material. I oxygenate well with O2 and a stone, low rate for 2-3 mins or so, until a nice layer of foam is on the top. I will oxygenate once more after 8 hours or so, same low rate for a minute or two.

I agree with bierhaus15, I love the character this yeast gives to English Ales. It does need at least a week, two even better, to cold condition after carbonation. You want to get all the yeast you can to drop out before you serve or enter into competition. The yeast really puts out a weird aroma when the beer is young, especially on the Ordinary Bitters as I mentioned in my previous post.

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Old 10-27-2012, 11:14 PM   #19
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I just took a gravity sample of the 3 malt stout that repitched the 006 into. In 7 days the gravity is down from 1.061 to 1.012...so about 80% attenuation this time. ...and I noticed the weird aroma too on the bitter. Hope it will face quick.

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Old 10-28-2012, 08:48 PM   #20
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Just tapped my latest special bitter with this yeast. Went from 1.047 to 1.012, kegged after 17 day primary and it's been in the keg for two weeks now. Flavor is very nice, light fruit esters with good maltiness and the yeast really lets the hops and malt shine. Could still use another week to get crystal clear, but so far it looks to be another good bitter.

As for the strange aroma in young beers with this yeast, I've noticed that too... especially for the first week. One batch I was considering dumping as it did have a musty aroma out of the keg. A week later, it was completely gone.

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